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It is not 'crystal clear' that a question about America is about the US.

  1. MickS profile image73
    MickSposted 5 years ago

    It is not 'crystal clear' that a question about America is about the US.

    So why do some people on here sometimes ask questions about 'America' and presume that everyone knows they mean the US?

  2. profile image0
    Sarra Garrettposted 5 years ago

    Probably because everyone in the world knows that America is the United States of America.  It's common knowledge.

    1. MickS profile image73
      MickSposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      No, America isn't the US, the US is just a country in a vast continent that is split into two parts. to think that that the US is America is as wrong as saying, Ghana is Africa, France is Europe.

    2. duffsmom profile image60
      duffsmomposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      That might be the way it is viewed in the UK but take a look at all the "death to America" signs etc. all over the world these days.  They mean the US. I think for most it is simply a shortening of the name United States of America.

    3. profile image0
      Sarra Garrettposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Generally speaking when America is mentioned it is associated with the United States.  If someone wanted to South America for instance, you would think of Africa..........

  3. profile image0
    Old Empresarioposted 5 years ago

    The short answer is I honestly think some people in the United States don't know the actual name of their country. But it's also difficult to come up with a good noun for people from the US since our nation is a collection of states, instead of just one simple nation-state. I would prefer we simply name an individual state; as in, "Why do Texans....? The US is really too large a country to paint a wide brush over anyway. I never hear people from the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland refer to themselves as "UK citizens" or United Kingdomers". They always say, "British" or "Irish".

 
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