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In Biological Cell Division, what is the input that the cells take as energy sou

  1. TZRINZ profile image84
    TZRINZposted 4 years ago

    In Biological Cell Division, what is the input that the cells take as energy source and where frm?

    We know that bacterias increase in population by duplicating themselves and getting divided into two. According to Mass Energy Interconversion, there must be some energy source that contributes to extra mass to obtain another cell of same kind.
    So, whats  that energy source in normal atmosphere that bacterias utilise to gain their mass. If its energy from some, what could be mechanism of ATP conversion in these single- celled creatures.

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  2. ChristopherJRex profile image88
    ChristopherJRexposted 4 years ago

    I believe that you answered your own question, actually.  The first part of your statement, "getting divided into two," alludes to this fact that matter/energy is neither created, nor destroyed; just transformed.  The cytoplasm (including all of the things in it: plasmids and such) is split approximately in half between the two "new" bacteria (this is actually the proper plural word for bacteria, not “bacterias”).  Therefore, each “new” cell ends up being ~half of the size (mass) of the original bacterium (proper singular word for bacteria), with approximately the same genetic information.  There is a special, internal mechanism by which a bacterium knows that it has reached the appropriate (large) size to be able to divide (that way it doesn’t split into continually smaller and smaller bacteria).  I hopes this helps answer your question!

    1. TZRINZ profile image84
      TZRINZposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Yeah thats quite helpful, Thank you.
      But I am still confused with, what does that bacteria intakes after division to grow back to its large size and whats the mechanism of mass-energy conversion in a bacterium.

    2. ChristopherJRex profile image88
      ChristopherJRexposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Bacteria are either chemotrophs or autotrophs, deriving the bulk of their energy from organic compounds or the sun, respectively.  Chemotrophs convert energy to mass like we do, while autotrophs convert energy to mass like plants do.

    3. TZRINZ profile image84
      TZRINZposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      thank you

 
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