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What's your explanation for this?

  1. aka-dj profile image76
    aka-djposted 3 years ago

    No-one answered this question in the Education & Science forum.
    I guess all the inhouse experts are this forum.

    Here's the link.
    http://hubpages.com/forum/topic/123043#post2606419

    1. MelissaBarrett profile image62
      MelissaBarrettposted 3 years ago in reply to this

      Yes I have.

      I wrote a book about it. Actually, I told several people to write a book about it, but it was really my words they wrote. I breathed them.

      But indeed I did see it. The book says so.

  2. psycheskinner profile image80
    psycheskinnerposted 3 years ago

    You are question seems to be whether anyone recently saw an amoeba turn into a blue whale. I imagine everyone assumed that to be rhetorical.

    My answer, in kind, would be: have you recently seen someone bring a four day old corpse of a man back to life?

    1. aka-dj profile image76
      aka-djposted 3 years ago in reply to this

      Wow. That was a good explanation.

      Next.

  3. Zelkiiro profile image85
    Zelkiiroposted 3 years ago

    You do know cell division is exponential, right? 100,000 cells per day sounds like a lot, but when you hit a certain point, 100,000 cells are swiftly divided in less than an hour, and it keeps going--much like us, whales lose a lot of their skin cells as they swim (along with any other cells in their body that decay), and so that extremely rapid division is necessary.

    1. aka-dj profile image76
      aka-djposted 3 years ago in reply to this

      Ok. So, that means that the whale went from amoeba (or some other one cell creature) to it's current size in MUCH less time?

      Do amoeba's (or any other one cell creatures) multiply by hundred's of thousands of cells (into new creatures, not thousands of single cell copies/offspring) in any given year?

      That IS the evolutionary process, is it not?

      1. psycheskinner profile image80
        psycheskinnerposted 3 years ago in reply to this

        It means an gamete becomes a blue whale in months.

        If you are actually talking about evolution you should be less cryptic.  Getting big is one of the least impressive things that can happen to an evolving species.

        1. aka-dj profile image76
          aka-djposted 3 years ago in reply to this

          Not in my mind.
          Going from one cell to trillions is VERY impressive!

          That'd be just a very small fraction of the requirements needed, in order for that many cells to work cohesively, as a body.

          So, what's your answer?

 
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