What are your views on Mars One? Will it Work?

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  1. LeeSkittrall profile image78
    LeeSkittrallposted 3 years ago

    What are your views on Mars One? Will it Work?

    I recently wrote a Hub here on HubPages about Mars One and am really interested to know what other peoples views are on the plans being set out and to discuss Mars One itself.

    Do you think it will work?
    What challenges do you think the Astronauts (the applicants) will face leading up to leaving Earth and during their time on Mars?
    What Technical Challenges do you think will face here on Earth?
    How do you think the events of Mars One will affect religion and religious societies?

    I'd be really interested to know your opinion and discuss this question.

    https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/12238523_f260.jpg

  2. profile image0
    Stargrrlposted 3 years ago

    I think there will be monumental problems. Deaths will occur.  I think that if we were to colonize Mars, because of the gravity difference, humans born there would look different.  Then that would be a new race and they would have to face discrimination.  By living on Mars, you'd be putting your life into the hands of other men--relying on an oxygen machine and a gravity machine.  Also, it would take six months to get there!  It would probably cost a million dollars for a ticket, and that would probably make it a one way trip for most people.  I didn't read your hub, but I think I am going to.  It sounds intriguing.

    1. LeeSkittrall profile image78
      LeeSkittrallposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you for your answer Stargrrl, what makes you think there will be problems? Eventually the part of our race on Mars will inevitably evolve, I guess that may in some ways make them superior to us here on Earth. You can't just buy tickets for it.

    2. dashingscorpio profile image87
      dashingscorpioposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      With all the advances & marvels of discovery man has made over the years including going to the moon religious people have not only held onto their faith their numbers have grown. It's doubtful a known atheist could get elected president of U.S.

    3. LeeSkittrall profile image78
      LeeSkittrallposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      dashingscorpio, I agree for the US, but what about other countries? What are your views there?

  3. Lady Guinevere profile image59
    Lady Guinevereposted 3 years ago

    The astronauts are alsready experiencing problems.  Without gravity the bones of the body start to deteriorate.  That is just ONE of the many problems they have found living up in the space stations already.

    1. LeeSkittrall profile image78
      LeeSkittrallposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you for your answer Debra, this is true, there have been issues with Gravity levels, the only thing we know  about the life support will have produced a breathable atmosphere of 0.7 bar pressure, 3000 litres of water and 120 kg of Oxygen.

    2. Lady Guinevere profile image59
      Lady Guinevereposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      So close but so far.  I think it may take yet another 100+ years before we can actually travel past our moon....man that is.  I love all the pictures the Hubble n othr crafts are bringing back.  We must also no how old the are. not enough words left.

    3. LeeSkittrall profile image78
      LeeSkittrallposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      What makes you think it will take 100 years +? the proposition is to have it completed in 9/10 years,

  4. dashingscorpio profile image87
    dashingscorpioposted 3 years ago

    Space exploration will not have any effect on religious beliefs.
    Most likely as with anything man attempts initially there will be failures until we figure out a way to succeed. The process of inventing planes led to some deaths as did our initial attempts to reach the moon. 
    Man is only limited by his imagination and his will.
    If we want it "bad enough" we will succeed in putting a man on Mars.

    1. LeeSkittrall profile image78
      LeeSkittrallposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you for your answer dashingscorpio, what makes you think it will have no effect? I agree that man is only limited by his imagination, do you think we want it bad enough?

  5. M. T. Dremer profile image94
    M. T. Dremerposted 3 years ago

    Our first attempts to go to the moon didn't go smoothly, so I worry about the safety of the first astronauts that go to mars. Though, I'd like to think we've learned a lot since then. Especially having successfully landed several rovers on its surface. But I hope that we get there eventually. It would be a huge leap forward for humanity.

    1. profile image0
      Stargrrlposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I often wonder--what will we do if we get there?  Look around?  Learn more about the Martian surface?  For what?  There's no life there.  All we're going to find are red rocks and red sand.

    2. LeeSkittrall profile image78
      LeeSkittrallposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you for your answer MT, it is true that safety can be a worry, they are however planning to use the landings for equipment and rovers prior to the astronauts landings, would you ever consider going?

    3. M. T. Dremer profile image94
      M. T. Dremerposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I wouldn't go. There are too many things I love on Earth. But I do see Mars as a bit of a "plan B" for humanity. If something goes horribly wrong with Earth, humans can survive in this universe, which (in my mind) is priceless.

    4. LeeSkittrall profile image78
      LeeSkittrallposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Stargrrl, there may still be things yet to be discovered on the planet.
      MT, I too love too many things here on Earth,I agree that it is some sort of a plan B, but how do you supposed they'd get us there if we needed to evacuate? who would get to go.

    5. M. T. Dremer profile image94
      M. T. Dremerposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Hopefully we will have established an effective transport system by the time Earth would need to be evacuated. Though I imagine, if Earth does start to become unstable, it will be a slow burn, rather than an all-at-once kind of thing.

    6. LeeSkittrall profile image78
      LeeSkittrallposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I'd like to think we would have sorted transport too, however, I do feel it may be bias to those who are wealthier/appear to have more importance, what do you think?

    7. M. T. Dremer profile image94
      M. T. Dremerposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Yes, there would likely be a bias. Although that could arguably lead to a rebound for Earth. Say, for example, your rich oil tycoons leave for Mars, and emissions plummet here. Maybe it would be better to stay.

    8. LeeSkittrall profile image78
      LeeSkittrallposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you for all your comments and answer MT, I agree, there could be a better outcome yet.

  6. JPac1 profile image59
    JPac1posted 3 years ago

    I think the point of the voyage is to find out if it will work. We never know until we go there, the basic motivation of pioneering. Discovery involves inherent mystery. I think it's exhilarating and frightening to think of what could be on Mars, what we could find, what we could build. Of course it begs the question, how far is too far? But I think part of the beauty in the massive expanse of our universe is how ripe it is for exploration. I suppose those who take themselves to Mars will go through a human struggle unlike any before. They will certainly miss the comforts of home, the familiarity of not just their home nation and town, but their home planet. That's a pretty profound thing to think about. The possibilities here are unbounded. Incredible. What wonder.

    1. LeeSkittrall profile image78
      LeeSkittrallposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you for your answer James, I completely agree, without trying, we will never know; discovery does indeed involve inherent mystery. How far do you think too far is? Would you ever consider going to Mars yourself?

    2. JPac1 profile image59
      JPac1posted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I think too far is manipulation of the nature, structure and cycle of the universe. Not to include the changing of the state of the universe, simply in living we do that. But when we disrupt its perfect, self-balancing cycle, we've gone too far.

    3. LeeSkittrall profile image78
      LeeSkittrallposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you again James, however I don't  think I can agree with our current cycle being perfect, or completely self-balancing, as it is in constant change, more than we ever realised until recently. As for going too far, how far is too far?

    4. JPac1 profile image59
      JPac1posted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Sure, it's in constant change. But it absolutely homeostatic in nature. Look at Earth, for instance. Until we pumped too many fossil fuels into the atmosphere for it to handle, the Earth perfectly balanced its own air, water and soil to support life.

    5. LeeSkittrall profile image78
      LeeSkittrallposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I don't believe that the Earth has been balanced for a long time even before us, as for pumping fossil fuels into the air (e.g. CO2), to be honest with you, although it is not necessarily good, there was 5 times as much when Dinosaurs roamed Earth.

    6. JPac1 profile image59
      JPac1posted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Perhaps; I'm saying by pumping as many fossil fuels as we have into the air by anatural means, we've thrown off Earth's cycle - not that it's never seen as much CO2. Earth is still a perfect oasis for human life, surrounded by things that kill us.

  7. Markeli profile image90
    Markeliposted 2 years ago

    Man hasn't been to the moon for over 40 years and Mars is much much more challenging, both for astronauts and engineers. Mars One has virtually no experience, not even a proper test camp here on earth. Fortunately their lack of funding will make sure their suicidal mission will never take off. Mankind will eventually get to Mars (in the mid 2030s perhaps) but a lot of improvements need still to be made and the mission won't take off unless there is at least a plan to bring these men back to earth.

 
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