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What does "an exchange of questions" mean as in After an exchange of questions

  1. Natalie Frank profile image96
    Natalie Frankposted 17 months ago

    What does "an exchange of questions" mean  as in After an exchange of questions Pearson opened fire?

    This question may be related to specific terminology once used in the navy that is no longer used, My question is related to differences in terminology used in the military in different points in time and the reasons certain terms were used at different times and different wars historically.

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  2. profile image59
    Setank Setunkposted 17 months ago

    There is no naval ease here. Pearson was asking questions to an apposing ship about it's identity. There is some controversy over the records about the battle of Flamborough Head.
    Naval ships commonly used flags to communicate identity and intention, but also to give commands to other ships. These codes evolved to become quite complex. It was not universal in the 18th and 19th centuries and trying to figure it all out, along with changing naval jargon, is frustrating.

    1. Natalie Frank profile image96
      Natalie Frankposted 17 months agoin reply to this

      Thanks.It was tough for me to figure out some phrases in the orig. documents. Do you know of jargon that was specific to the 18th & 19th C & what the equivalent would be now? Are some still used out of custom despite having no actual relevanc

    2. profile image59
      Setank Setunkposted 17 months agoin reply to this

      Naval jargon can be found on line easy enough. But reading stories written in the language of seafarers is absolute poetry to me.

    3. Natalie Frank profile image96
      Natalie Frankposted 17 months agoin reply to this

      Setank Setunk Do you know of any fiction written in the language of seafarers by chance?

    4. profile image59
      Setank Setunkposted 17 months agoin reply to this

      Time Life 22 volume series "The Seafarers" My favorite volume is called; "The Windjammers".  I have the entire set, but it is non-fiction.

    5. Natalie Frank profile image96
      Natalie Frankposted 17 months agoin reply to this

      Thanks for the info!  I'll check them out.

  3. alancaster149 profile image84
    alancaster149posted 17 months ago

    It will still take place: ratings (seamen from the vessel) or shore patrol guard a vessel when she's in dock or at a quay. There's a password in wartime or when a vessel is 'under orders' (restricted access). When challenged a potential enemy/intruder gives the wrong answer,
    'Halt who goes there?' 'Galley (kitchen) personnel, mate'. 'What's the password?' 'Who wants to know?'
    An unsatisfactory reply to a challenge gives cause to open fire in certain circumstances.

    1. Natalie Frank profile image96
      Natalie Frankposted 17 months agoin reply to this

      Wouldn't they have to be flying their flags though? If they signal each other with flags how can they not determine the ship is an enemy ship from their Nat. flag so they need to challenge them? Were they allowed to mislead by flying a false flag?

    2. alancaster149 profile image84
      alancaster149posted 17 months agoin reply to this

      Challenges can be verbal or signals. At sea it would be signalling, ashore verbal. You didn't specify it as a signalling issue. False signals were used as 'lures'. Only on further exchanges - pre-set code - might the enemy be rumbled

 
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