History & Myths of Agates

  1. figment profile image81
    figmentposted 8 years ago

    Agate comes from the Greek word "Agateeq" which means happy. Agate is one of the oldest stones in recorded history, and no two agates are alike.

    The agate is the known to be the mystical birthstone for September. It is also the birth stone for the Zodiac sign of Gemini. Agate is said to be particularly beneficial to people born under the sign of Gemini as it helps them to remain calm and focused. Agate is the accepted gemstone for the 12th and 14th wedding anniversaries.

    The agate is believed to discern truth, accept circumstances, and is a powerful emotional healer. Legend says that agate improves memory and concentration, increases stamina and encourages honesty. It is believed to prevent insomnia and insure pleasant dreams, to enhance personal courage and protect one against danger. Agate provides a calming influence, improves perception, concentration and helps to develop and increase one's analytical talents. Legends mention the power of agates to secure the wearer from danger and to protect children from falling. They were believed to endow their owners with strength, courage, security and even healing of fears. It aids in making new friends, promotes peace, gardens, money, personal goals, business success, and stability.

    The Sumerians are believed to be the first user of agates in seals, beads, and jewelry. Agate was discovered with the Stone Age man in France 20,000-16,000 B.C. But scientists believe that some agates in Australia range from 2.72 to 3.50 billion years old! Agates were highly valued by ancient civilizations, as it was believed to render the wearer invisible. In Islam culture, Agate is believed to protect the wearer from tragedies or evil. In many legends agate is believed to cure the stings of scorpions and the bites of snakes, soothe the mind, prevent contagion, quiet thunder and lightning, secure the favor of the powerful, and bring victory over enemies. The Babylonians used eye agates for protection against evil. The ancient Egyptians believed that agates protected the wearer from lightning, bestowed the power of speech, and quenched thirst if you put it in your mouth. Persian magicians used agates to divert storms. In Greece, the power of agate was considered so strong that Orpheus is depicted as carrying agate on his descent into Hades. Ancient Chinese believe wearing agate jewelry would purify one's mind, energize one's chi and bring good luck and great opportunity. The practice in medieval times was to tie them to the horns of your oxen to ensure a good harvest. Agate bowls were also popular in the Byzantine Empire and collecting them became common among European royalty during the Renaissance. Today many museums in Europe have spectacular examples on display. The Persians, the Arabs and other Oriental people principally used agates for finger rings. Upon these, usually figure a carved verse from the Koran, the owner's name, or some magical or symbolic figure to protect the owner from a wide variety of calamities.

  2. Rochelle Frank profile image94
    Rochelle Frankposted 8 years ago

    Why don't you expand this into a hub?

 
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