Water Conservation

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  1. GRDavis89 profile image48
    GRDavis89posted 8 years ago

    Water conservation is a main issue in the world today.  The best way to conserve water is to reuse water or find ways to store rain water.  The best and easiest way to conserve and reuse water is through the use of rain barrels.  Lawn and gardening uses nearly 40% of the total household water usage during the summer.  By using a rain barrel, this will cut down the water usage drastically.  Depending on where you live,  it will save homeowners around 1,200 gallons of water during the year which will save you on water and energy costs.  It is also protects the environment by reducing the amount of runoff rain creates that gets polluted from running along the ground into a drain which eventually diverts into a lake or stream.

    Why wouldn't you use a rain barrel?

    1. profile image0
      WildIrisposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Without delving into the politics of water, one could collect water run-off  from a metal roof. Can one collect run-off  from composite asphalt shingle roof  and use it safely? In the west summers are dry, so one would  have to store winter rain water in something larger than a barrel. What I am trying to say is that the logistics of conserving water this way is more complicated than sticking a barrel at the bottom of a downspout.

      The best way to conserve water is to use it as a precious resource. Reusing soapy water in the garden, even with biodegradable soap, can kill plants. It takes time for soaps to breakdown. Just because I can live a simple life,  I'm not sure everyone else is ready to live a simpler life and collect rain water in a barrel.

      1. Lisa HW profile image66
        Lisa HWposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        Sorry..    I don't want to use water from my asphalt roof.  There's bird mess on it.  As it is, if it's raining hard, the water from the porch roof drips on my head when I leave, and I'm imagining a head full of bird-mess germs. 

        In all seriousness (although I am pretty serious about the bird mess), I don't like that recycling often means using water to rinse out containers. I've often wondered how much water is being used, not just for something like rinsing out containers, but in the whole recycling process overall.  Of course, I haven't tried looking up those kind of figures because I'm not sure I'd believe the latest "conventional wisdom" anyway.

        1. Jeff Berndt profile image89
          Jeff Berndtposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          Lisa, you're not meant to drink the roof water. You're meant to use it to water the lawn and the flowers. You're not going to kill your lawn with bird-poopy water; in fact, it may even help it.

          I collect rainwater and use it to irrigate the garden.

          Also, lawns, period, are a huge waste of space, water, and effort. We should bring back the Victory garden.

        2. Rochelle Frank profile image95
          Rochelle Frankposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          Well (wells are good) , he's not talking about drinking the water off of your roof-- but using it for watering your plants, veggie garden and such. That can be done.

      2. Jeff Berndt profile image89
        Jeff Berndtposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        Iris, every little helps. If everyone simply stuck a barrel under their downspout, and used that water on their garden first, and only turning on the hose when the barrel was empty, then we'd save a ton of fresh water (and energy!).

        Just because doing it on a large scale is hard and complicated is no reason not to do it on a small scale and get that wee bit accomplished.

        1. Argen profile image55
          Argenposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          every little bit counts.

          What is upsetting is when you try to do these things and you live in a deed restricted community that does not allow rain barrels.

          1. Jeff Berndt profile image89
            Jeff Berndtposted 8 years agoin reply to this

            Laws can be changed. Bad laws should be.

    2. Misha profile image70
      Mishaposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Seriously?

      1. profile image0
        WildIrisposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        Seriously!

        1. Misha profile image70
          Mishaposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          I would think the vast majority of the world population would disagree.

          1. profile image0
            WildIrisposted 8 years agoin reply to this

            Huh? "I would think...would disagree." To what are you trying to point your argument?

            1. Misha profile image70
              Mishaposted 8 years agoin reply to this

              I would think the vast majority of the world population would disagree with water conservation being the main issue in the world today. There are plenty of more important issues IMO.

              1. profile image0
                WildIrisposted 8 years agoin reply to this

                True, finding potable water within walking distance would be of greater importance for a vast majority of the world's population than being concerned with water conservation.

                1. Misha profile image70
                  Mishaposted 8 years agoin reply to this

                  As I said already, I think the vast majority of the world population have more burning issues to worry about. Not gonna argue about obvious things. Ciao. smile

    3. LillyGrillzit profile image78
      LillyGrillzitposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      You are speaking the Truth about water supplies...Thank you.

  2. goldenpath profile image71
    goldenpathposted 8 years ago

    It is the responsible thing to do, I agree.  The reason most do not do this as was done by our ancestors from yesteryear is convenience and cosmetics.  We have become a very lazy society.  The discipline of work is not as it was even thirty years ago.  Also, property value and "what others think" is paramount these days.  Rain barrels are just not cosmetically appealing to the eye. 

    If we are to ensure self reliance in the future we are going to have to start disciplining ourselves in these types of conservative initiatives.

  3. Shadesbreath profile image83
    Shadesbreathposted 8 years ago

    The reason we don't do this is because the government AND the enviros collude to undermine property rights with just enough help from the guys who pump water and treat it, the guys who sell it back to you in bottles at prices higher than gas, the people who sell those two groups power, and most of all, from the power-grubbing left using the enviros to facilitate the dismantling of private property by eroding mineral rights first.

    There's money and power in water, and you can't even have a water barrel in some states already.  Most people have zero clue about the politics involved with water. They're taking mineral rights first, then property rights will go after that, and the founding father's work will be undone (and we won't be able to throw off the power-grabbing, dysfunctional government 'cause they're taking 2nd amendment rights too smile.

    1. Cagsil profile image82
      Cagsilposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      lol lol lol lol lol just thought it was funny that is all. smile

  4. kmackey32 profile image66
    kmackey32posted 8 years ago

    I once saw a sign it said, save water and shower with a friend... I think I will take the route.. hehe

    1. Misha profile image70
      Mishaposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      With you? With pleasure! wink

    2. Argen profile image55
      Argenposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      A great sign kmackey32, showering with a friend or spouse is a great way to cut down water consumption.
      You can also get a showerhead with an on/off valve and turn the water off to soap up.
      Baths use huge amounts of water and you never really get clean soaking in your own filth, stay away from those.

      1. kmackey32 profile image66
        kmackey32posted 8 years agoin reply to this

        Yes I know, its the best idea so far... hehehe

  5. TLMinut profile image60
    TLMinutposted 8 years ago

    My friend tried that to water her garden in Utah but was told it's illegal, not allowed! WTH?
    I guess soon there'll be officials arresting little kids for trying to catch snowflakes in their mouths - that sky water must belong to the government...

    1. Jeff Berndt profile image89
      Jeff Berndtposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Where in Utah? And was she using rain water or water from the tap?

      'Cos really, trying to grow a european-style garden (whether ornamental or a vegetable garden) in a freaking desert is a special kind of foolishness.

 
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