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jump to last post 1-4 of 4 discussions (7 posts)

How does music education affect live music in performances?

  1. talfonso profile image81
    talfonsoposted 5 years ago

    How does music education affect live music in performances?

    I just stumbled across a site called "Save Live Music on Broadway" and read about producers replacing some or even all the musicians in the orchestra pits with MIDI-equipped machines or prerecorded tracks. Well, other than feeling bad about it, I have to link it to the school music programs being cut short. I hypothesized that if school music is being cut, then less musicians are produced, meaning less musicians in the pit.

    What do you think?

  2. Lauryallan profile image80
    Lauryallanposted 5 years ago

    I would agree with you 100%. When I was younger I learned to play the violin at school and tuition was taken from taxes. I even borrowed a violin from the shool and each pupil advanced at their own pace. Some went on to special music academies and became professional musicians.
    Nowadays, these kinds of programs no longer exist and the only instrument most kids get to play is the recorder in primary school. Private music tuition is expensive and most families don't have the money for such an extravagance. If you add up the cost of piano lessons or voice coaching it quickly comes to thousands of pounds and most kids will never reach the level where they will be paid for their talents or hard work.
    Also with less actual children learning to play instruments they tend to have less respects for musicians and think it must be easy to play an instrument. Things like Guitar Hero haven't helped either.

    1. talfonso profile image81
      talfonsoposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      On the quip about Guitar Hero - I don't play the game (not interested). But your comment serves a point. Children who actually play real musical instruments, not video game controller look-alikes, are more likely to preserve the state of live music.

  3. DLPreacher profile image54
    DLPreacherposted 5 years ago

    OMG really?

    I guess my question would be twofold:  (1) Are the musicians being replaced with MIDI-equipped machines and/or pre-recorded tracks because of costs, lack of funding, etc? or; (2) Are the musicians being replaced with MIDI-equipped machines and/or pre-recorded tracks due to the lack of qualified, experienced musicians... Oh well, I guess the second question is somewhat ridiculous...but I always try to play devil's advocate....

    Anyway, getting to the matter at hand.  I would venture to say that Broadway producers are responding to the economy and the recession.  It probably costs far less to use pre-recorded tracks than live musicians.  However, the musicians unions probably need to protest against this... I'm sure they are not happy that this "cost cutting effort" is cutting into their paychecks.

    In my opinion, there is nothing like a truely "live" performance.  There can be digital enhancements here and there; but to completely eliminate a live orchestra and replace the music with an orchestrated track?  I think not.  What's next, replacing the actors with holograms?  LOL!  Then essentially you just have a film; nothing live.

    1. talfonso profile image81
      talfonsoposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Good points. I prefer semi-live, though I appreciate those who don't care whether the performance has taped music or not.

  4. PAPA-BEAR profile image61
    PAPA-BEARposted 5 years ago

    We are fast moving to an unreal world of synthetic so called creations. The Non-Orchestra is already upon us, just as a pile of bricks can be arranged and called art. It is cheap dumming down of the real world. Just like mass production lost the professional touch, so the synthetic drum will deserve the pre-recorded audiences hand clap. .

    1. talfonso profile image81
      talfonsoposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Exactly! There are machines called "virtual orchestras," and most (not all) have the cheap-sounding MIDI. I'm cool with cruise ship and theme park shows as long as the stagings are good, but in prof. performances I prefer at least semi-live.

 
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