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jump to last post 1-7 of 7 discussions (13 posts)

Would you let your high school freshman have a co-ed Halloween party?

  1. alphagirl profile image82
    alphagirlposted 5 years ago

    Would you let your high school freshman have a co-ed Halloween party?

    Would you let your high school freshman daughter have a co-ed Halloween party? Tell me the parameters. She originally wanted it in our basement. But I could not fit
    30 kids. So we have opted for the garage, covering the walls with black plastic, adding some orange lights, refreshments, a portable fire-pit and corn hole, 15 chairs.
    My biggest concern is having too many kids show up. I told her we would be monitoring it. Does anyone have any ideas how to control it while keeping it
    interesting? I told my daughter I did not want a flash-mob-texted party.



    https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/7249615_f260.jpg

  2. the girls profile image80
    the girlsposted 5 years ago

    I will definitely allow my high school freshman have co-ed Halloween party. You have to tell her to stick to the 30 guests. Your teenage daughter can control her own party and ask her to inform you if flash-mob-texted-party ever happens.

    1. alphagirl profile image82
      alphagirlposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Yes, she can control the party to a degree. I just don't want kids 75 kids on my lawn..LOL. Thanks for your suggestion.

  3. Duchessoflilac1 profile image73
    Duchessoflilac1posted 5 years ago

    As long as you have laid the ground rules there should be no issue. You will be there to monitor. The garage sounds like a great idea.

    1. alphagirl profile image82
      alphagirlposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I laid out ground rules, but I better type them up and have her sign-off and show it to her friends. Yes, we have a 3 car garage. it helps since it is in the 50's at night.

  4. lburmaster profile image83
    lburmasterposted 5 years ago

    Make a list of who is invited. If someone not on the list shows up, get rid of them. The safety of your home and belongings are more valuable than a teenager with hurt feelings. They will get over it. I never get over my belonings being harmed or taken. Second, I would have camera's in the room because I'm paranoid. Adults in the room just make the party go dead. By having a camera, they will act like you're not even there but you still can see. Honestly, I would take advantage of the party to see how my child acts when I'm not around. Who does she hang out with more? Etc. Third, if the party gets out of control, have a fail safe system. Say it is getting late and no one wants to leave, turn a switch and something that irritates them goes on. For example, the music turns off and a loud sound drives everyone away.

    1. alphagirl profile image82
      alphagirlposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Good ideas...but then kids will think we are creepy parents. It is a balance. I appreciate your thoughts.

    2. lburmaster profile image83
      lburmasterposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      ...you don't want to be seen as a creepy parent? Huh... My parents embraced their creepiness. That's interesting.

  5. smlbizmatters profile image68
    smlbizmattersposted 5 years ago

    Sounds like a fun event and teens that age should be monitored to some extent. Did you think about "invite-only".  Teens or humans in general love the idea of exclusivity. That way you can have your kid make a guest list and anyone that shows up outside of that truly isn't welcomed to the party. I think that's fair enough.

    1. alphagirl profile image82
      alphagirlposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I love the invite only Idea. I will have to have a code: for them to enter. If they do not know the party code they can't come in. Like a promo code for the day.  Thanks for the your invite only idea.

  6. RichieMogwai profile image79
    RichieMogwaiposted 5 years ago

    What a great question.  I don't think I will allow the party though. As I have seen from the experience of my friends, it can get really rowdy, and way too many kids show up so eventually no matter how you expect the kids to behave, it gets out of control. Plus all that mess is so hard to clean up after. Let's put it this way, kids will be kids.  I have been a kid too, so I know.

    1. alphagirl profile image82
      alphagirlposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Yes! I do worry! Thanks for stopping by to comment!

  7. BSloan profile image73
    BSloanposted 5 years ago

    Having a teenager myself, I would opt for having the party at home.  If you have it in the garage you can keep everyone in that area without having anyone enter your home.

    From my point of view, I would rather have my child in my home than having them go elsewhere.  At least I know I will be looking out for them and can set limits as to what is allowed and what is not allowed.

    One suggestion:  Since it is Halloween and you will be decorating, why not set up the front as a "Club" with 2 "bouncers"  You can enlist 2 dads to be the "bouncers" .  Rope or tape off the area and the dads can dress up as bouncers with a clip board and list of who's in and who's not. 

    Issue paper invites to your guests with their names on it.  If they have an invite, they get in, if not they don't.

    Good luck and have fun, pretty soon they'll be all grown up and on their own.

 
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