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jump to last post 1-8 of 8 discussions (8 posts)

Is it better to be thin and healthy or "thick" and healthy?

  1. peeples profile image94
    peeplesposted 3 years ago

    Is it better to be thin and healthy or "thick" and healthy?

    Thick meaning still in a healthy BMI but on the higher side of the normal range. Thin meaning on the lower end of the normal BMI range. Currently I am thick, but have been trying to decide if being thick leads to being overweight, and if being thinner is the best option long run(early 30's now).  How does someone make the decision of what is best for themselves?

  2. Tusitala Tom profile image66
    Tusitala Tomposted 3 years ago

    Let Nature decide for you, would be my advice.   We all have an optimum level of body weight based on our height, bone structure and metrabolic rate which is natural to us.   Don't start mucking around with diets.  From what I've deduced, it's one of the worst things you can do.   If you want to trim down to your optimum shape and size, excercise sensibily, eat good food and let nature gradual shape you into the shape you're supposed to be.

    Four or five decades ago there were very few overweight people; today, its about forty-percent or more people who are carrying far to much fat.  We already know the downside of that down the track.   

    Excercise across a wide range: aerobics, pumping iron, yoga-type stretching are all good.  This will keep your breathing, muscle strength and body suppleness in good condition.   Fitness makes for a healthier you.

    This does not mean you cannot enjoy 'some' junk food, or have a beer or three or a glass of wine.   It does mean that 'in the main' you stick by fresh, healthy foods that will feed and nourish that body you want to sculture.

  3. M. T. Dremer profile image95
    M. T. Dremerposted 3 years ago

    In my mind, the thick or thin doesn't matter so long as healthy follows it. That's really the only part that matters. People have different shapes, it's normal and it should be celebrated. But we do have to be careful about promoting unhealthy habits. For example those songs about saying it's okay to be plus-sized. Which is true, if you're healthy. But, It's not okay to suggest that eating bad food and having bad habits is good.

  4. cathylynn99 profile image75
    cathylynn99posted 3 years ago

    according to science, thick may be better. lowest mortality was found among those who were overweight but not obese.

  5. deecoleworld profile image81
    deecoleworldposted 3 years ago

    It's just better to be healthy. Some people are naturally thinner than others, and some people are naturally thicker than others. It makes no sense to force yourself in the body shape you weren't born into (such as trying to lose weight to be thin and healthy). To understand more of what I just said google body types mesomorph, ectomorph,and  endomorph to know what I mean.
    Just work with what you got, be happy in the skin you are in, eat right, exercise and try to be happy!!!!

  6. Daniella Lopez profile image93
    Daniella Lopezposted 3 years ago

    If you're happy with your body and you're healthy, don't worry about it. Thinness or thickness has very little to do with actual health, but more to do with genetics/ancestry. I'm Hispanic. I'm always going to have curves. Even if I dropped down to 95lbs (which would be very small, considering I'm 5'6"), I would still have some curve to me. That's just part of my heritage and I'm proud of it. However, despite being curvy, I'm very healthy. Just find the size that makes you happy and stick with it. smile

  7. mikejhca profile image95
    mikejhcaposted 3 years ago

    I like being on the higher side of the normal range for the BMI because of muscle. It is better to be lean and muscular than skinny fat. People at the lower end usually don't have enough muscle and they are more likely to have health problems. Being light is bad for your bone density. People that don't eat very much often miss out on things their body needs.

    Personally I try to keep my options open. I want to be able to do things with my body. Do you want to be fragile? Do you want to be weak? If not then be a little on the heavy side but make sure it is because you are strong. Being skinny is not enough. As you age you will lose the ability to do most things if you don't exercise enough.

    Being thick leads to being overweight if you don't work at maintaining a healthy body. Being thin leads to being weak and fragile if you don't exercise enough. I have seen a normal sized person become obese but it was because he stopped exercising.

    Make the decision to continue to work at maintaining a healthy body. Some older people stopped taking good care of themselves over 25 years ago.

  8. monia saad profile image73
    monia saadposted 3 years ago

    Always best to be as you would like and you have to be feeling good about your shape and most importantly of all this is to maintain good health and this comes to eat healthy food and exercise regularly

 
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