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New Alzheimers Drug perhaps?

  1. Aficionada profile image89
    Aficionadaposted 5 years ago

    I am so thrilled to read this article about a drug that has potential use with Alzheimers patients.

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 … 144005.htm

    Like some other exciting discoveries, this drug was originally planned, designed, and used for another purpose.

    Comments?

  2. WillStarr profile image84
    WillStarrposted 5 years ago

    Wonderful news if it works on humans! We lost Dad to Alzheimer's in 1999.

  3. The Suburban Poet profile image77
    The Suburban Poetposted 5 years ago

    What are they waiting for! My Dad has Alzheimers'... just start treating people with it... why wait?

    1. Aficionada profile image89
      Aficionadaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I understand your point!

      I need to review the article.  I know that the drug was developed for use with cancer (not sure of the specifics, such as the specific type of cancer).  That sounds like it has already been tested on humans and found to be safe - but, as I hinted, I may have overlooked something in the article and I may have assumed something that wasn't there.

      My perspective is, if it is truly known to be safe for humans, what could it hurt to start using it with Alzheimers patients?

      EDIT/ADDITION:  When I reviewed the article, it did state that the drug has been used with cancer patients for ten years.  I guess that answers that.

      And, another addition:  The whole approval process could relate to how willing the insurance companies would be to cover the cost for not-yet-approved purposes.  Since modern drugs tend to be expensive, that is probably a huge issue.

      1. Pcunix profile image91
        Pcunixposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        Just because it has been used on cancer doesn't mean it is safe. Many cancer treatments are very unsafe, in fact. The hope is that you will survive but the cancer will not or that the attack by the treatment will trigger your immune system into action against both insults.

        But it is very hopeful news regardless.

  4. Aficionada profile image89
    Aficionadaposted 5 years ago

    I'm so sorry to hear of your loss, Will. 

    There's a great deal of Alzheimers in my mother-in-law's family, including my MIL.  It would be so wonderful if the drug could be found to be effective for humans and become available for us during her lifetime.  I doubt that it can be so, but I can still hope.

  5. WillStarr profile image84
    WillStarrposted 5 years ago

    "What are they waiting for! My Dad has Alzheimers'... just start treating people with it... why wait?

    Have you ever seen those predator-lawyer commercials, wanting you to sue over a supposed 'bad drug"? That's the reason drug companies must be so cautious and careful. In the meantime, people are dying. What we need is a law protecting drug companies in such cases, because that would actually save lives.

    1. The Suburban Poet profile image77
      The Suburban Poetposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I know I know... shit I'd practically be willing to waive my rights in that regard. You know how it ends Will. My Dad is 83. It's obvious what is happening and it seems that in this type of situation it's damned if you do damned if you don't but if you do there is at least some hope. There is none if we do nothing. But I'm just howling at the moon...

      1. WillStarr profile image84
        WillStarrposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        "I know I know... s**t I'd practically be willing to waive my rights in that regard. You know how it ends Will. My Dad is 83. It's obvious what is happening and it seems that in this type of situation it's damned if you do damned if you don't but if you do there is at least some hope. There is none if we do nothing. But I'm just howling at the moon..."


        Don't give up. I was instrumental in getting Aricept released early, back in the 90's when Dad was sick. Stay with it my friend and hammer away on the internet.

  6. paradigmsearch profile image92
    paradigmsearchposted 5 years ago

    Ah, the perfect thread...

    Anyone know where I put my glasses?

  7. WriteAngled profile image86
    WriteAngledposted 5 years ago

    In order for a drug to be used in another "indication" (i.e. to treat a different disease/condition), it has to go through the whole registration process afresh, with preclinical studies and clinical trials, although sometimes it is possible to speed up some of the formalities.

    However, doctors can also prescribe drugs "off-label", namely for indications that are not covered by existing authorisations. In such cases, though, the doctor has to take full liability for doing so, and could thus become victim of legal actions. It would therefore depend on some doctors feeling confident (and brave) enough to prescribe this drug ahead of any official approval of its use in Alzheimer's.

    1. Terri Meredith profile image75
      Terri Meredithposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I just finished reading a follow up article to the recent discovery.  Since the news first came out, people (caregivers) have been contacting their doctors about possible use for their family members.  There seem to be two major concerns besides the fact that it hasn't gone through the proper channels and trials for a different use from the original.  One is that there's too little known about the way it may interact with other prescriptions a patient might be taking.  Since it's usually the elderly suffering from Alzheimer's, they're usually on several medications.  The second problem has to do with the insurance companies.  They won't pay for the prescription if it's "off-label".  The out of pocket cost would then be $1200 to $2500 per DAY!

 
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