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Smart Phones Pros and Cons - Can the Writer Live Without One?

Updated on October 7, 2013
Maybe Franz Kafka understood the perils of letting technology overwhelm one's soul.
Maybe Franz Kafka understood the perils of letting technology overwhelm one's soul. | Source

No matter how good of a writer you are, if you don't somehow get your message out to the public people will never know you existed, unless of course your name is Franz Kafka. Kafka is a now famous writer who spent his life toiling away in an insurance office and never really got around to promoting his writing. Finally, after good old Franz was dead and buried, things started to happen when his friend Max took his works to be published instead of burning them as instructed. In this manner Franz finally became wildly successful, influential and famous. It is the subject of raging, heated, vociferous theological and metaphysical debate about whether our deceased Franz really knows or cares about his crazy success on any level, since it all took place after he was dead.

Most of us writers don't want to wait until after we are dead to become famous. Most of us would like to achieve prosperity plying this trade in the here and now, not after we are sitting on some fluffy white cloud playing the harp with the angels, or down in the sulfurous pit banging our head to death metal with the demons. Who knows whether they even have an Internet connection in either of those places, so we can check our hub views.

But we no longer have to wait for posthumous success, like Kafka did. For a lot of people who struggled becoming noticed before, the wonders of the Internet have made success possible in our lifetimes. This improvement in a writer's prospects has taken place basically because the Internet has eliminated the middleman. It is no longer necessary for the writer to toil through the tedious process of submitting manuscripts and watching the rejection slips pile up in the garage. Now we can show our collective middle finger to the middleman, publish our material instantly online, and let it succeed or fail on its own merits, not on the whim or bias of some bored editor slogging through mountains of submissions. Therefore, technology has become the aspiring writer's best friend, but has it also become somewhat of a double-edged sword?

This shiny little black box adds one more complication to an already complicated life
This shiny little black box adds one more complication to an already complicated life | Source

Enter the Smart Phone

The smart phone has changed the game even more for the online writer. This is because the key to success to Internet writing seems to be building an effective social network through sites such as Hub Pages, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc. Just as in the produce industry, the creation of a large audience of readers through social networking requires keeping everything fresh. New posts have to made on a daily basis and notifications have to be checked and responded to promptly. The writer does not want to give the impression that he is like my two sons, who I know read my text and Facebook messages but never reply. No, the writer wants to be engaged with his or her audience and make them believe that he really cares, even if he really doesn't. Of course, because I have no social life I love every one of my online friends as if they were my intimate family members. I realize this is sad and sort of pathetic, but I think it beats sharing my home with dozens of cats.

Up until about three months ago I did not own a smart phone. Of course I was the laughingstock of the neighborhood, and my children no longer respected me. Dogs on the street that used to let me pet them were now shying away. Remember that this is California, where everything is slick and glossy and superficial, even the dogs. Although I really had no desire to keep up with my neighbors, I could recognize the practical advantages of a smart phone, so when my cellular provider offered me an iPhone 4 for (free?), I finally broke down and got one.

What follows is an account of how the smart phone is changing my life, for good and for bad. These are only preliminary results, because I've only had the thing for three months, but I think they are indicative of things to come.

Can a smart phone help the writer to slash his/her way through the tangled jungle of social media apps?
Can a smart phone help the writer to slash his/her way through the tangled jungle of social media apps? | Source

Smart Phone Advantages

The primary advantages of the smart phone lie primarily in being able to more effectively manage an online audience with social networking tools. The smart phone's advantages are particularly relevant for those of us who are rarely home and don't have the luxury of being able to watch the computer with one eye and learn new family friendly recipes from Rachel Ray with the other. Even though I consider it my hobby and not my real job, the US Mail requires a lot of my attention. Because I am involved in postal related activities anywhere between 8 to 11 hours per day, I am the poster boy for someone who needs a smart phone to keep up.

Before I owned a smart phone it was a struggle to squeeze time in to write while at the same time performing all of the necessary social networking tasks. Bouncing between the two had me as loopy as a blindsided quarterback being lifted off of the turf on a stretcher. Multitasking like this while writing is not often advisable. Unless the writer is one hell of a good engineer his train of thought can become derailed quite easily and go careening off a cliff face to explode in flames at the bottom of some dark chasm, never to be recovered.

Therefore, what the smart phone has done for me is to make it possible to perform those mundane social networking tasks while I am away from home. I can now check my email wherever I happen to be stuck in a temporary holding pattern; waiting for my pills at the pharmacy (writers need lots of pills), standing in line at the grocery store or post office, taking care of business in the bathroom (unpleasant image but true), and worst of all, idling at long traffic lights. Don't lecture me - I fully understand the dangers involved in such distractions, which will be covered later. I even use my new phone to search for hub followers at a part time security job I do - nonchalantly hubbing away as the building I am supposed to be watching burns around me.

When I finally get home for my frenzied bursts of computer time, I can now devote it mostly to writing. With the necessary housekeeping having been taken care of while I was out, I can give most of my attention to the creation of hubs, blogs, and fiction. Of course, my wife is still there hovering in the periphery, filling my head with portents of doom, gloom and woe about what will happen if we don't fix the sink and the refrigerator and the washing machine, but since that lovable old gal isn't a smart phone app I can't turn her off. I just have to let her run in the background.

Anyhow, the primary advantage of the smartphone is to help the up and coming writer keep ahead of those bothersome networking chores that are time consuming and sometimes tedious, but probably necessary for success.

Owning a smart phone can be a hazardous proposition for the mailman slash writer.
Owning a smart phone can be a hazardous proposition for the mailman slash writer. | Source

Smart Phone Cons - Health Risks

As alluded to in the traffic example, the disadvantages of the smart phone can make the device dangerous to life and limb. Even so, I believe that the primary disadvantages of this mobile communications device lie in the spiritual realm. In essence, it disconnects the writer from reality and imprisons his or her soul inside of that sterile little electronic squawk box.

But let's start with the health risks. Any of you who have ever tried to text and drive, with or without a smart phone, understand the dangers of distracted driving, so I don't have to spell them out. But don't try to bamboozle the Highway Patrolman who pulls you over by saying that you were tweeting with your smartphone and not texting, so technically you were not violating the law. If you really want to scratch off seeing the inside of a criminal detention facility from your bucket list this might be an easy way to do it, but if you are allergic to handcuffs like me you might just want to take the ticket cheerfully and keep your mouth shut. Anyway, if texting while driving is distracting, a smart phone will multiply the distraction level exponentially when Twitter, Facebook, the stock ticker, email, the weather, Face Time, and Candy Crush Saga are added into the equation. Even a calculus major can't solve for "x" on that one.

Another disadvantage of the smart phone is that it is like the obsessive ex girlfriend that needs your attention 24-7. So unless you can figure out how to turn off your notifications from Facebook, Twitter, and the multitude of other social networking apps, you are bound to lose sleep when the alert bell goes off to tell you that @InsomniacJoe is now following you on Twitter! Actually, Facebook and Twitter took it pretty well when I told them to hush up, but try as I may I have not been successful in disabling notifications on the Hub Pages App. No offense folks, but I really don't need to be woken up at 1 AM to be told that the hub "Top Ten Causes of Toenail Fungus in Rodents, which you are following, has a new comment. Luckily most of you sleep at night, so it doesn't happen very often.

You definitely don't want to be woken up by this at 1 AM.
You definitely don't want to be woken up by this at 1 AM. | Source

Twitter-think Syndrome

Another significant drawback of the smart phone is that it causes the writer to adjust his writing according to Twitter guidelines, instead of the rules of proper English usage. If you have a Twitter account and are a little long winded like me you realize that sometimes it is a challenge to compress your thoughts into neat little 140 character Twitter chunks. Twisting grammar and punctuation on Twitter can actually be entertaining and cathartic; basically because the Tweeters are given a poetic license with no restrictions whatsoever, but the Twitter rules should not carry over into other writing venues.

And yet the other day I found myself stuck in Twitter-think when I started a sentence with the horribly improper contraction "Dya" instead of the correct, Queen-approved "Did you." Yes, desecrating the English language can be satisfying, but these abominations should be left to die there on the unhallowed grounds of the Twitter battlefield and not dragged out into polite society. The smart phone, however, apparently does not know or care about the finer points of language, and even seems to delight in grammatical blasphemy.

Losing Your Literary Soul

Now we come to the most serious drawback to the smart phone, the one that can turn your soul into slick, automated muck.

Before I had a smart phone I used to spend my limited half hour lunch reading. I would find a nice shady spot to park my postal vehicle and then pull out some stained, dog-eared, worn out paperback book. To me these are the finest moments of being a letter carrier, and I worked my way wondrously through such massive novels as Tolstoy's War and Peace, Steinbeck's East of Eden, and a host of other fiction and non-fiction works in this manner, one half hour at a time.

Alas, I think those glorious days have departed, because before I start reading now I have to go through all of my email, and there might be twenty or thirty of these. Then I have to check Facebook to see if I have any new friend requests or other messages, followed by a glance at Twitter to see if I wish to follow any of the suggested follows. By the time I get around to reading I might have 15 minutes left before the bell rings and I have to get back to work.

A few days ago my son lent me the book Flow my Tears The Policeman Said, by the science fiction author Phillip K. Dick. I was really looking forward to reading this because I have not yet sampled the works of this writer, but my smart phone doesn't care. My smart phone tells me there is other more urgent business to take care of. There is a photo to upload to Twitter of a couple of rabid Dobermans that had visions of making me lunch. There are a few ideas for a hub I have to jot down in the Notes app before they escape me. Some people commented on a recent Facebook post and I have to go in and "Like" every one of them so they'll know I am paying attention. A thousand other sundry smart phone chores also have to be taken care of before I can get around to reading, and meanwhile my half hour lunch is rapidly dwindling away.

Has the smart phone caused your peaceful lunchtime to go up in flames?
Has the smart phone caused your peaceful lunchtime to go up in flames? | Source

Conclusion

As of this date Flow my Tears The Policeman Said is still sitting there in my mailbag, sadly unopened, begging for my attention. Has the smart phone stolen my soul? Has the pleasing feel and smell of living paper been permanently replaced by a crass, soulless, blinking screen? Or will I successfully integrate the smart phone into my life so that I am left with a portion of my humanity, and not permanently turned into a mindless slave to some callous robotic master? The old saying Time will Tell probably applies here, but to get the time I have to look at my smart phone. I don't wear a watch anymore.

Is the smart phone more of a positive or a negative for the aspiring writer?

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    • Mel Carriere profile image
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      Mel Carriere 19 months ago from San Diego California

      I used to think my smart phone was a useful tool dy0pxa, but now I confess I'm tired of the damn thing. Scrolling through infinite Facebook notifications becomes exhausting. I think maybe I could do without it. Thanks for reading.

    • profile image

      dy0pxa 20 months ago

      Can't say that smart phones are good or bad for a writer starting out?. I would miss my phone if did not have it.

    • Mel Carriere profile image
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      Mel Carriere 2 years ago from San Diego California

      Thank you Kristen Howe. The problem is that they are a mixed blessing. You just have to learn to budget your time between the phone and your real life. Thanks for reading!

    • Kristen Howe profile image

      Kristen Howe 2 years ago from Northeast Ohio

      Great hub, Mel. One of the days, I'm going to get a smart phone. I believe it can helpful, since they have a keyboard for you to type on the go.

    • Mel Carriere profile image
      Author

      Mel Carriere 2 years ago from San Diego California

      Thank you Breanne. I have finally taken my lunch break back and am reading again. I am still pretty much chained to the phone but at least I have that half hour respite.

    • Breanne Ginsburg profile image

      Breanne Ginsburg 2 years ago

      I think in a way smart phones are helpful to aspiring writers because if we don't have a computer around or paper, we can quickly type down an idea. However, at the same time, I feel safer writing down things on my computer and often end up saving the stuff I write from my phone to my computer anyway.

    • Mel Carriere profile image
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      Mel Carriere 3 years ago from San Diego California

      That is very nice, thank you. I try to just write what flows out through my fingers, somwtimes it works and sometimes it doesn't. I appreciate you stopping by.

    • MarieLB profile image

      MarieLB 3 years ago from YAMBA NSW

      Hi Mel,

      What a great article that was!! Truly enjoyed it. I found myself nodding and having a chuckle at the way you explained things so clearly. It was as if you were there having a coffee with me, and I was listening to your story.

      Great article!

    • Mel Carriere profile image
      Author

      Mel Carriere 3 years ago from San Diego California

      You are not alone. I only read on the phone, and then just once in a while. I miss the days of curling up with a good book with the feel of paper in my hands. Thanks for dropping in!

    • smine27 profile image

      Shinichi Mine 3 years ago from Tokyo, Japan

      This is something I've been wondering for awhile now. Ever since I got my smartphone a few years ago, I hardly read anymore unless it's my my iphone or iPad mini. YIkes

    • Mel Carriere profile image
      Author

      Mel Carriere 3 years ago from San Diego California

      Thank you Nadine May, I appreciate the kind words. Smart phones are definitely revolutionizing the lives of some of us, and sometimes in some not so good ways. I appreciate you dropping in!

    • Nadine May profile image

      Nadine May 3 years ago from Cape Town, Western Cape, South Africa

      I read your post with enjoyment. Yes I do have a smart phone and I meanly use it to send sms to my children via WhatsAp. We have WiFi at home so my sms are for free. I have the cheapest contract and never run out of airtime. I must admit that when I go for lunch with friends I do NOT like it when they look at their cell phones. I rarely take mine with. Usually I forget and I never look at my emails on my cell, my battery would run dray to fast. Voted funny.

    • Mel Carriere profile image
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      Mel Carriere 3 years ago from San Diego California

      Thank you for dropping by Dave. The problem is that once you get a smart phone life seems impossible without one.

    • DaveOnline profile image

      David Edward Lynch 3 years ago from Port Elizabeth, South Africa

      Thanks for advising us on the pros and cons of Smartphones Mel. I don't yet have one myself but am thinking I would like to invest in one at some stage.

      I like the humour you have included in this hub too.

    • Mel Carriere profile image
      Author

      Mel Carriere 3 years ago from San Diego California

      Thank you torilynn for dropping in and reading.

    • torrilynn profile image

      torrilynn 3 years ago

      This was an interesting hub and very insightful, I thank you. Voted up.

    • Mel Carriere profile image
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      Mel Carriere 3 years ago from San Diego California

      The book actually didn't turn out to be as good as I thought, but my reading has definitely suffered. Not enough hours in the day, and as soon as I get a down moment I'm going straight for the phone. Thanks so much for reading and commenting.

    • mpropp profile image

      Melissa Propp 3 years ago from Minnesota

      Mel, I'm definitely torn on the whole smart phone pros and cons. I've had one for more than a year now, but still haven't delved too deeply into using it. I've found my kindle, tablet, and lap top to be enough of a time sucker to pull me sufficiently away from writing...I love your sense of humor and style of writing. Very fun read! Many months of have now passed, I hope you finally got around to reading that book?

    • Mel Carriere profile image
      Author

      Mel Carriere 3 years ago from San Diego California

      Although my children would tell you I'm an incessant yacker in person I don't like to talk on the phone at all. All the same my phone is my constant companion and it has made my life easier and more complicated all at once. Thanks for reading!

    • cygnetbrown profile image

      Cygnet Brown 3 years ago from Springfield, Missouri

      Hi Mel,

      I have to tell you, I had a smart phone for two years. When the contract was up, I went back to a plain cell phone. I would rather do my social media on my laptop. I HATE texting! If I'm going to be on the phone, I'd rather be talking. There I said it! Anyone else want to tell the emperor he has no clothes? LOL!

    • Mel Carriere profile image
      Author

      Mel Carriere 3 years ago from San Diego California

      Thank you CrisSp I am glad you enjoyed my silly little writer's embellishments. For me the smart phone has been a double edged sword - certainly a valuable tool but sometimes my wife yells at me for not paying attention to her. Thanks for reading'

    • CrisSp profile image

      CrisSp 3 years ago from Sky Is The Limit Adventure

      I like the funny additions here specially the "Top Ten Causes of Toenail Fungus in Rodents". Lol!

      I do have a smart phone but I don't go crazy on it and yet I'd admit, I can't live without it.

      Good, interesting hub!

    • Mel Carriere profile image
      Author

      Mel Carriere 3 years ago from San Diego California

      Sadly I think the world has moved on and the days of the paper bound book are numbered. There is something more natural and intimate about paper, but I guess we have to get used to it. Thanks for reading!

    • kerlund74 profile image

      kerlund74 3 years ago from Sweden

      I like your thoughts in this matter. I think the smartphone is just great if I come up with an idea that I have to write down, or as you mention be social... But I have almost stopped reading books to and that is a hugh lost. I don't ave the time. So here are somethings to deal with and maybe get some structure?!

    • Mel Carriere profile image
      Author

      Mel Carriere 4 years ago from San Diego California

      Yes, I'm becoming addicted to my own as well, to the detriment of other activities. I suppose that somewhere I need to learn to strike a healthy balance. Thanks for dropping by and commenting!

    • mdgardner profile image

      Martin D Gardner 4 years ago from Virginia Beach

      I enjoyed reading this hub. I have a long commute to work and I'm completely guilty of checking social media while sitting in tunnel traffic (not moving of course). I would say that they have made a positive impact for the most part. I don't know what I would do without my smartphone.

    • Mel Carriere profile image
      Author

      Mel Carriere 4 years ago from San Diego California

      For some reason tirelesstraveler your comment came out mangled on the hub pages app but looks fine on the web page. Sorry if I slighted you in any way.

    • Mel Carriere profile image
      Author

      Mel Carriere 4 years ago from San Diego California

      Glad you enjoyed it and I hope you get it fixed or you'll be stuck writing in bad English forever. Pretty soon text speak is going to be standard English anyway so we might as well get used to it. Thanks for dropping in and come back anytime!

    • tirelesstraveler profile image

      Judy Specht 4 years ago from California

      LoL! Am writing the on me phone. 3 months ago I got this phone. The vertig is still out. Good reading for a Sunday.

    • Mel Carriere profile image
      Author

      Mel Carriere 4 years ago from San Diego California

      Since I'm writing this comment on a smart phone it would be absurd to say they are not useful, but I have found they can get addictive and out of control. Thanks for the great comment and the share!

    • thelyricwriter profile image

      Richard Ricky Hale 4 years ago from West Virginia

      Mel, voted up, useful, awesome, interesting, and shared on Facebook. Great article!! I still don't own a smart phone, but I'm planning to get one this month because I post on social media websites for my clients. I agree with your perspective, both good and bad the smart phone is. I have no choice at this time, but I can appreciate everything you mentioned in this article. Well done:)

    • Mel Carriere profile image
      Author

      Mel Carriere 4 years ago from San Diego California

      They are a double edged sword, a blessing and a curse. They have definitely changed our lives and will continue to do so. Thanks for dropping in.

    • JPSO138 profile image

      JPSO138 4 years ago from Cebu, Philippines, International

      Smartphones are really useful as in my case, I used it all the time, in fact right now, I am using my smartphone to post this comment. Well, its about control, since getting hooked on smartphones will also take away a good family time. Great hub!

    • Mel Carriere profile image
      Author

      Mel Carriere 4 years ago from San Diego California

      Thank you for your wonderful comments and the share. The only reason I don't turn mine off is because I'm afraid I will get an emergency phone call at night. I am gradually getting used to the gentle singing of the hub pages app, which won't turn off. Thanks for stopping by!

    • Kathryn Stratford profile image

      Kathryn 4 years ago from Manchester, Connecticut

      This is very funny! So funny, in fact, that I am sharing it.

      I like smartphones, although when I sleep at night I mute my phone. Between my social networks and my e-mails, the notifications would definitely wake me up.

      Thanks for sharing this with us, and have a great weekend.

      ~ Kathryn

    • Mel Carriere profile image
      Author

      Mel Carriere 4 years ago from San Diego California

      I agree. The connections in this world are baffling when everyone has a Facebook page or a blog. The good thing is that the entire world is our neighborhood now. Glad you enjoyed it.

    • LKMore01 profile image

      LKMore01 4 years ago

      You have a wonderful sense of humor, Mel and I'm so happy I discovered you HUBS. This is our modern dilemma. We have never been more connected but less connected.

    • Mel Carriere profile image
      Author

      Mel Carriere 4 years ago from San Diego California

      Reading about toenail fungus at 2am when your smartphone wakes you up can be a life changing experience. The hub pages smart phone app can be very persistent. I would like to write a hub about it but they don't allow profanity. Thanks again.

    • aviannovice profile image

      Deb Hirt 4 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      Okay, Mel, that's it. No smartphone for me, because I just haven't the time. Nor do I want anything to go up in smoke, especially me and the toenail fungus.

    • Mel Carriere profile image
      Author

      Mel Carriere 4 years ago from San Diego California

      Glad you enjoyed it. I think as long as the writer realizes that it's a tool and not a lifestyle there should be no problems. Thanks for reading.

    • AliciaC profile image

      Linda Crampton 4 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

      I have a very basic phone. I'm sure a smart phone would be useful, but it could definitely have some drawbacks, as you've described in this entertaining hub!

    • Mel Carriere profile image
      Author

      Mel Carriere 4 years ago from San Diego California

      Glad you enjoyed it and thanks for stopping by.

    • Eiddwen profile image

      Eiddwen 4 years ago from Wales

      A wonderful read and thank you for sharing Mel.

      Eddy

    • Mel Carriere profile image
      Author

      Mel Carriere 4 years ago from San Diego California

      Thanks for reading. It is a useful tool if not abused. I also like the fact I can post my articles to Facebook at heavy traffic times of day when I'm not home.

    • DDE profile image

      Devika Primić 4 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      Smart Phones Pros and Cons - Can the Writer Live Without One?I have a smart phone and manage well with it so easy to download photos to the computer but I don't like touch screen helpful points mentioned here voted up, useful and interesting

    • Mel Carriere profile image
      Author

      Mel Carriere 4 years ago from San Diego California

      I'm sure you could handle it, but the unanswered question is "is it worth it?" I appreciate you dropping by and commenting.

    • wetnosedogs profile image

      wetnosedogs 4 years ago from Alabama

      I have a basic phone and probably couldn't handle the smart phone. So guess I am better off.

      Enjoyed your entertaining hub.

    • Mel Carriere profile image
      Author

      Mel Carriere 4 years ago from San Diego California

      That's a good point. It's easy to get distracted. I get invited to play Candy Crush Saga all the time but I'm not really a gamer so I resist the temptation. Thanks for reading.

    • profile image

      sheilamyers 4 years ago

      Interesting hub. I can't say one way or the other if a smart phone is helpful to a writer because I still have a dumb phone. You do make some good points about being able to keep up with social networks during breaks. But I have to tell you, there are some people I work with who are lucky their phones aren't smashed into a million little pieces. There are too many people addicted to the phones and they use them instead of doing some real work.

    • Mel Carriere profile image
      Author

      Mel Carriere 4 years ago from San Diego California

      Thank you for your nice words and support. Unfortunately for me, I think this little box has me trapped and there is no turning back. I'm answering your comment on it right now. I think you're better off.

    • JayeWisdom profile image

      Jaye Denman 4 years ago from Deep South, USA

      I live happily without smart phone, Facebook or Twitter. Before I retired from my long career, I was a slave 24/7 to a Blackberry, email and the clock. No longer!

      I bought a plain vanilla cellphone with a year's supply of prepaid minutes only for emergency use. It is doubtful I will use a fraction of those minutes, but my house phone is digital and not usable in the event of a power outage. I also carry the cell phone with me in the car when I go someplace, which isn't often.

      I stopped wearing a watch when I retired. If I want to see the time when I'm indoors, I look at my computer screen (bottom right side) or the microwave. If I'm in the car, the radio/CD player also has a clock.

      I don't "do" Facebook because, during the brief time when I had an account, I realized I didn't want to know everything "friends" and "friends of friends" were thinking and doing every minute of the day and night. I've never tweeted, but feel the same about Twitter that I do about FB.

      I do not feel the slightest bit deprived without a smart phone, Facebook, Twitter or watching the clock. In fact, I feel liberated! Now, if I can just control the urge to check HubPages more than twice a day, I'll be fine....

      Voted Up, Funny and Interesting.

      Jaye

    • Mel Carriere profile image
      Author

      Mel Carriere 4 years ago from San Diego California

      Thanks for the nice words. I had a cell phone like yours forever and somehow survived. The smart phone frees up time for certain tasks but distracts me from things I used to love to do, particularly reading. I have the Kindle app on my phone but I still rarely read. Thanks for reading!

    • CraftytotheCore profile image

      CraftytotheCore 4 years ago

      Such a great read! Once again very entertaining. Believe it or not, I do not have a smart phone. I have a very inexpensive cell phone from which I make a few calls and keep mainly for the benefit of being able to be reached by the school in case something happens to the children. I love how you say you haven't worn a watch since getting the smart phone because same is true with me. I take my phone everywhere as a clock. LOL