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How can poets teach others that haiku can be any syllable length under seventeen

  1. Sheila Wilson profile image82
    Sheila Wilsonposted 6 years ago

    How can poets teach others that haiku can be any syllable length under seventeen syllables?

    I'm passionate about teaching others to explore poetry. Haiku is a form that I use often. The rules of haiku include using a season word, avoiding anthropomorphism, having a shift in focus or conflicting image, and writing about one moment in nature. Haiku is a challenging form that is very rewarding as well. The 5-7-5 syllable count is not a legitimate rule of haiku. Haiku should have as few syllables as possible. Haiku can have 2 lines or more. How can haiku poets teach others that the 5-7-5=haiku rule they learned in school is false? How can we teach the beauty of this complex form?

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  2. Don Crowson profile image73
    Don Crowsonposted 6 years ago

    The term "traditional" should be used with 5-7-5.  Some poetry contests specifically say traditional Haiku.  However, if the contest says Haiku without traditional, experimentation is allowed.

  3. Sheila Wilson profile image82
    Sheila Wilsonposted 6 years ago

    @ Don Crowson It's disturbing that some contests classify "traditional haiku" as having 5-7-5 syllables. I don't believe I could ever enter such a contest held by groups who obviously don't understand haiku. The Japanese haiku inventor and master Basho wrote haiku that had four or even five lines which is perfectly acceptable in haiku. I would describe "traditional haiku" as following all the rules of haiku such as containing a seasonal reference and a contrast or shift in the image. That people who think they know haiku would include that American "rule" just shows how misunderstood this form is.

  4. cat on a soapbox profile image96
    cat on a soapboxposted 6 years ago

    I'd refer poets to the Haiku Society of America for variations of Haiku and other Japanese forms.  http://www.hsa-haiku.org/archives/HSA_D … _2004.html

 
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