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jump to last post 1-6 of 6 discussions (6 posts)

How does one find a good and honest editor?

  1. meow48 profile image75
    meow48posted 6 years ago

    How does one find a good and honest editor?

  2. HattieMattieMae profile image60
    HattieMattieMaeposted 6 years ago

    I need to know this myself ! Good queston! smile

  3. blogvicar profile image60
    blogvicarposted 6 years ago

    Join a writing group. They should be able to help. Visit a library and ask the librarian. Your local newspaper might have a line on local reporters with editing talent.

    An editor will need a thousand words or so to work on. The fee for such work should be bearable. Steer clear of editors who say they need much more. They don't!

    Editors should not be asked to teach you to write. That is a task for writing tutors and their schools.

    Find an editor who you feel you can work with; one who understands the sensitivity of all writers. Reject bullies and those who overcharge.

    'Honesty' and 'good' are words that can mean what you want them to mean. Just find someone you feel comfortable working with.

    All the best

    Jonathan
    author 'How To Write A Book Or Novel'  available now on the Amazon Kindle Store

  4. SubRon7 profile image60
    SubRon7posted 6 years ago

    Blogvicar made some really good points, but, as usual, I have an opinion too. For goodness sake, be your own editor! Go thru that manuscript until you see no mistakes, typoes, misspellings, whatever, and while you're doing that keep your eyes open for changes you want to make, characters you want to add, the list goes on and on. In my longest novel "The Bellwether" I first typed 2-3 times (I don't remember how many) on a manual typewriter, then 3-4 more times on an electric, finally a semi-computer, where I could at least make changes on the screen, and now finally a laptop (the best of all!) Anyway, I edited and revised that book a minimum of 30 times, all 800 pages. Today it sits at Amazon and doing fairly well.
    Writing, my dear, is work, and you MUST do most of the work yourself.
    After you think you have done what you can, then, I would look for an editor, and that's where I would look into a writer's group, or, possibly, even paying someone to look, but remember, all the critiquing and editing you will get from others (even the socalled professionals) It's only their opinion. You have to make the final decisions.
    Keep moving forward and Good Luck with your goals!
    James W. Nelson

  5. Twilight Lawns profile image83
    Twilight Lawnsposted 6 years ago

    If you live in the UK or even if you live elsewhere (we don;t need to be on someone's doorstep to contact them now, in this age of technology) go to someone like that very talented writer, lady Wordsmith (http://ladywordsmith.hubpages.com/) she is not only a very intelligent and gifted writer, but she is an editor by profession.

  6. Nicole Breit profile image81
    Nicole Breitposted 6 years ago

    Word of mouth is the very best way to find any professional. If you don't know anyone who can make a referral, I would try LinkedIn, or send out a message via social media. You never know who may be able to connect you to someone they can recommend.

    Regarding pricing, as with all professions, you get what you pay for. You can find someone on elance who charges $15/hour but takes three times as long as a professional editor who charges professional rates, which are higher, but provides a truly professional result in a fraction of the time.

    I am a professional writer and editor, and believe it is very difficult for writers to spot their own errors; this is true for both novice and professional writers. After a certain point, especially when working on longer manuscripts and after many intense hours of writing, we stop seeing our work and "stumble past" typos and errors.

    However, I agree that it is important to do as much of the work in cleaning up your manuscript yourself. Let your writing sit for a few days or even a week before going back with fresh eyes, and spend the time making it as perfect as you possibly can. This will save you time and money on a professional editing service.

 
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