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Is there one book that you have read and re-read?

  1. Colin Quartermain profile image95
    Colin Quartermainposted 3 years ago

    Is there one book that you have read and re-read?

    I find that some books I read and that is enough, but others I read, and then re-read it several months later.

    One example of this is Patriot Games by Tom Clancy, and is a book I think I have read at least ten times since I brought it 20 odd years ago.

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  2. Edwin Thomas profile image76
    Edwin Thomasposted 3 years ago

    The Tale Of Two Cities by Charles Dickens... I have read the book several times. I just love the book and its author

    1. Colin Quartermain profile image95
      Colin Quartermainposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Good choice and definitely my favourite Dickens novels (although I am not a great fan of his per se). It is a book that I have in my ebook library, but read the paperback many years ago.

  3. FatFreddysCat profile image98
    FatFreddysCatposted 3 years ago

    Back when there were only four books in the "trilogy," i re-read Douglas Adams' "Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" series several times. Since then two more volumes have been added (making it, as the later volumes state, an "increasingly inaccurately named trilogy") but I've only read each of those a single time.

    1. Colin Quartermain profile image95
      Colin Quartermainposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Ah yes the adventures of Arthur Dent, Ford Prefect and the paranoid android.  Have you read Dirk Gently novels?

    2. FatFreddysCat profile image98
      FatFreddysCatposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I've read two of the D.G. novels but it was a long time ago.

  4. motivationsblog profile image91
    motivationsblogposted 3 years ago

    Joel Osteen, Your Best Life Now. It always brings me back to what my purpose on this earth is. Every now and then I also need a refresher course on how not to sweat the small stuff. A good read helps me focus and keep it moving.

    1. Colin Quartermain profile image95
      Colin Quartermainposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Had to look that one up; not sure it got much publicity in the UK. Thanks for sharing, and I've learned something new.

  5. Emmyboy profile image81
    Emmyboyposted 3 years ago

    I don't think there's any book(fiction) I'll like to read more than two times.

    I guess that's why I really take my time to enjoy a good book when I come across one.

    But that said, I could remember that when I was younger, I reread King Solomon's Mines and Treasure Island quite a number of times.

    1. Colin Quartermain profile image95
      Colin Quartermainposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I have actually been meaning to reread King Solomon's MInes and then find the other novels about Allan Quatermain. I used to have a copy of Treasure Island, but not sure what I did to it after my last house move.

  6. GizSleep profile image78
    GizSleepposted 3 years ago

    I have read Domain by James Herbert repeatedly, not exactly a literary classic but a novel I enjoy nonetheless.

    1. Colin Quartermain profile image95
      Colin Quartermainposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Think the only James Herbert book I have read was Fog back many years ago

  7. M. T. Dremer profile image93
    M. T. Dremerposted 3 years ago

    I've re-read the Harry Potter books a good six times or so. At this point it isn't about the story, it's about visiting Hogwarts again.

    1. Colin Quartermain profile image95
      Colin Quartermainposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I have read each of them once, and have actually been meaning to go back and re-read, as I don't remember much about Deathly Hollow

  8. satomko profile image93
    satomkoposted 3 years ago

    There are a few that I keep returning to and they get better every time.  The Big Sleep and Lady in the Lake by Raymond Chandler are not only thrilling hard-boiled detective stories, but Chandler's style and use of metaphors are powerful and evocative.  Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy is also a stylistic treasure.  Also Tombs of Atuan by Usula Le Guin is not just a great fantasy novel, but a beautiful piece of writing in which nothing is wasted.  I'm sure there are more, but these come to my mind most readily.

    1. Colin Quartermain profile image95
      Colin Quartermainposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Love the Philip Marlowe stories, but I have never got around to reading the Cormac McCarthy stories, although been meaning to read No Country for Old Men. I did have to look up Le Guin, as had not come across her books before.

  9. Anne Harrison profile image98
    Anne Harrisonposted 3 years ago

    J.R.R. Tolkien - The Lord of the Rings.
    I rad this about once a year, and always find something new. It's also my go-to book whenever I'm stuck with my writing - grammar, style, syntax, whatever - Prof. Tolkien is an expert on the English language, as well as in style and structure.
    Plus, it's a great story!

    1. Colin Quartermain profile image95
      Colin Quartermainposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Read the Hobbit at school, and many years later actually got round to reading the Lord of the Rings trilogy. I have read it a couple of times since, and love the side characters like Tom Bombadil

 
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