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I have wrote a book for children, should I post it?

  1. Ian Hudson profile image67
    Ian Hudsonposted 6 years ago

    Last year I wrote a children's book aimed at the Harry Potter age group. I am thinking about posting it on here, but it is 17000 words. Should I post each chapter as a separate Hub or would I be better off going for the entire thing on one Hub?

    1. lyndre profile image83
      lyndreposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      What is the Harry potter age group? Loved the films and I am 56.

      lol

      1. Ian Hudson profile image67
        Ian Hudsonposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        haha, I thought that after I had posted this. I guess any age smile

    2. Anthea Carson profile image58
      Anthea Carsonposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Absolutely, and I say post it as several hubs, and distribute them out little by little like a weekly post or something. And by all means I will read them.

      1. Ian Hudson profile image67
        Ian Hudsonposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Thank you Anthea smile

    3. h.a.borcich profile image61
      h.a.borcichposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I would research what publishing rights are affected once you have published online, if you are contemplating submitting the book to a hard copy publisher. I have focused on fiction writing for about the last year and I have resisted publishing online purely to avoid those complications. Good luck!

      1. Genna East profile image88
        Genna Eastposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        You bring up a good point.  I would copyright whatever is posted online, but also contact a publisher to see what conflicts of interest may arise if one seeks to publish this work later on.

    4. profile image55
      demon89113posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      probably go chapter by chapter so we dont lose place

    5. sirrot profile image60
      sirrotposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Did you use "have wrote" on purpose?  I am not an english teacher but that bothered me.  But I will admit that I occasionally use incorrect grammar just to attract attention.  I was just wondering.

      b

      1. qwark profile image60
        qwarkposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        If your use of English in your book is as bad as this:

        "I have wrote a book for children, should I..."

        I would'nt want my child to read it.

        Shouldn't that read: "I have written a book for children...?"
        ...or "I wrote a book for children..."

        C'mon man, "bone" up on your English then write a book!

        Qwark

        1. Ian Hudson profile image67
          Ian Hudsonposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          zzzzzzzzz

          1. qwark profile image60
            qwarkposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            I kinda figgered that'd be your attitude.
            I'm not surprised.
            tch, tch!
            Qwark

            1. Ian Hudson profile image67
              Ian Hudsonposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              If you had bothered to read the rest of the posts, you would have realized that the title has been pointed out a couple of times already. I just don't like snotty comments.
              I am currently studying English, so my knowledge in the subject can only get better. I don't want to be a writer. I am an artist, who happens to have WROTE a book. haha.
              I was only after some advice, as the few people who have spent time reading it said it was really good.
              I thought it would be nice to share the book with others, thats all.
              smile   
              Figgered?

              1. qwark profile image60
                qwarkposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                Oh? you have "written" a book?.
                Congrats..! I'm sure glad ya didn't "wrote" a book...
                I'm satisfied...
                hahaha 
                I've made mistakes (1) in offering a title too...and i caught alota hell.
                ..but that was so glaring.
                go for it.
                Qwark

        2. profile image0
          Website Examinerposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          "I wouldn't want my child to read it." seems the more appropriate contraction (notice where the hyphen is now inserted, after n not after d).

          1. qwark profile image60
            qwarkposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            Correct WEb:
            See? I'm not perfect....but why!  I try so hard!  smile:
            Qwark

            1. profile image0
              Website Examinerposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              Qwark, that was my point exactly: It is so hard to do anything perfect! Your writing looks good to me.

              1. Ian Hudson profile image67
                Ian Hudsonposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                Is everyone happy again? haha.
                  smile

                1. Ian Hudson profile image67
                  Ian Hudsonposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  Some of the art work for the book is on my Hub... ianhudsonfineart . It was a project I completed last year for my art course.
                  There is also a creative writing essay (for my English course) on my Hubs.
                  Please visit my Hubs and feel free to give your feedback.
                  Don't be too harsh though.

    6. profile image0
      Website Examinerposted 6 years ago

      Definitely separate chapters for each hub, then create a group to link them together. But unless you are very good at attracting an audience from the search engines (keyword research and such), your audience may be rather limited.

      You could also make an e-book out of it, then post a single review article with a link to purchase the book on Create Space (Amazon), Lulu, etc.

      1. Ian Hudson profile image67
        Ian Hudsonposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        To be honest I'm a complete novice at this type of thing. Thank you for your advice, I think research is in order. I will post the first few pages soon. smile

        1. Jean Bakula profile image93
          Jean Bakulaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Ian,
          I am in a similar situation.  I wrote a book around the same length as yours, which is considered a novella. I have received some letters back, but most publishers don't like unsolicited manuscripts. It isn't worth it for a first time author to get an agent. I am also unsure if I begin to post it here, will it ruin my chances of publishing it the old fashioned way? I really wanted to hold a real book in my hands. Most of the publishers expect you to "self publish" and it can be very expensive. I found two sites that may help you:  www.preditorsand editors.com and also www. absolutewrite.com. Best of luck, and let me know if you post it here!

          1. profile image0
            Website Examinerposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            Everything you write, especially something so long as a novella, can be valuable as a stepping stone to a career as a writer. Posting it here does not help, and will reduce the chances of that material being published elsewhere. The same thing goes for self-publishing.

            1. Teylina profile image60
              Teylinaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              Appreciate this comment which I missed before.  I think it sums up my exact fears and, as Ian admits, I'm really not sure what I'm doing or exactly how to go about any of it.  And mine's a whole novel! Thought about doing it as chapters and letting others in on writing the "wooden" parts just for fun as a different take on doing something like this. Ever heard of anyone doing something like that? So many of you have given him such excellent advice which I and many others can use, but I'm lousy with pulling in from other locations, and it seems Jean Bakula and Ian Hudson and I have a whole lot in common  with having checked stuff out and still feeling lost. Thanks for all the feedback, everybody! And thank you, Ian, for asking the question in the first place!

              1. Jean Bakula profile image93
                Jean Bakulaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                Teylina and all,
                I appreciate the advice, I figured if I posted my book on here in bits, it would ruin my chances of publishing it at a publishing house. I mailed about 20 manuscripts out at the end of August 2010. One publisher called soon and was  very aggressive, emailed, and tried to rush me. He said he got my message and understood. Basically everything I wanted to hear. But then when I checked him out better, he had only published about 1 or 2 books a year, from several authors that appeared to be friends of his. It sounds cheap to self-publish, with the right place you can do it for $1K or $2K. But they expect you to do all the publicity stuff, get bookstore engagements, advertise, etc, and that costs money, plus you need the connections. Then YOU have to purchase a specific number of your own books, and it's your problem to sell them. I am waiting until Spring, and will update my list of "Good" publishers from the sites I gave above, and try again. Please keep in touch if you have any good advice, and I will too.

            2. readytoescape profile image60
              readytoescapeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              There is a small point here I respectfully disagree, self-publishing. But do not post work you intend to publish on any open free access site.

              Traditional book publishing based on writing talent or strength of story are long gone. In the standards of tangible publishing houses of today if you do not possess some modicum of fame you will not be published.

              This of course is not an absolute and a few do make it, however such “breakthrough” authors are few and very far between. As the digital delivery of the written word becomes more prolific fewer and fewer books are published.

              You would be much better served to investigate self-publishing whether that be vanity press or E book. Publishing is about marketing, the only advantage to an author in today’s marketplace with a publishing house is their marketing power. And all work is now evaluated by ROI.

              If a publishing house’s marketing investment will not be returned by considerable margin increase, that work will not be printed. Though, if accepted by a house it may be formatted in Ebook or Print on demand be cause it has “potential” and costs less to market. 

              Why split your revenues with agents, editors and publishers when you can do this yourself, unless you are willing to pay large amounts of your royalties for their marketing.

    7. AdeleCosgroveBray profile image90
      AdeleCosgroveBrayposted 6 years ago

      That should read as, "I have written a book for children..."  smile

      If you wish to publish your novel on Hubpages, go ahead.  The choice is totally yours.  I suggest you give plenty of forward planning as to how you're going to promote it, though.

      Also, self-publishing has many pitfalls, so I'd encourage you to study the pros and cons before going ahead.

      1. profile image0
        Website Examinerposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Gee! Thanks for pointing out the obvious.

        On a serious note: Editorial quality is always a concern, especially if self-publishing is being considered.

      2. Teylina profile image60
        Teylinaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        My first inclination was to say if what you write is "I have wrote...." don't write. But I screw up all the time so figured I'd keep my mouth shut. However, since somebody else pointed out the obvious, and we're all prone to the occasional goof, I'll let you off! I have a similar problem, so glad you brought it up. I can learn of what everybody else told you and add the spin I had in mind! Thanks. Go for it!

    8. jokeapptv profile image61
      jokeapptvposted 6 years ago

      theres sites that will help you self print it.
      id do that ..thenm test it on ebay, craigslist etc.

    9. profile image0
      Sierra Mackenzieposted 6 years ago

      Teylina, I agree.  Correct English is a must.  As far as presenting a manuscript on the internet, there are tons of sites for writers that will let you post your work.  However, I would be fearful of doing that since it is so easy to have your work or idea stolen.

      1. sirrot profile image60
        sirrotposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Yes this bothered me too.

    10. Scorpio21 profile image77
      Scorpio21posted 6 years ago

      I was wondering about this as well. Also, would people be inclined to click on the ads on a story hub?

      1. Marisa Wright profile image93
        Marisa Wrightposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        No.  Anyway, you're not likely to attract readers from the search engines with a story Hub either - which means you're going to be largely dependent on the Hub community for readers.

        It's well known that fiction on HubPages is not a good earner.

    11. profile image0
      Website Examinerposted 6 years ago

      Great comment, Readytoescape! Much we can learn from you. I am definitely not opposed to self-publishing, if done well (a rarity). Standard publishing contracts exclude previously published works, so that would be a limiting factor. Each author must carefully choose, and there are some independent publishers out there willing to consider unknown authors.

    12. readytoescape profile image60
      readytoescapeposted 6 years ago

      I agree, but as the traditional publishing world continues a losing battle with digital delivery they are also being forced to embrace it. My point here is only; the Author’s need for a publishing house is becoming non-existent.

      You may well be better served by a good web master and a publicist, given that books are rarely sold on their own merit, it is the author that is the sales pitch. In buying the book your ultimately are buying the author and his story or opinion. Either way it is the “His” that is being marketed and sold.

    13. Ian Hudson profile image67
      Ian Hudsonposted 6 years ago

      I am studying English at present, so I should be able to correct any mistakes I have made throughout the book. I am also hoping that my English teacher will proof read the story, if he has the time.

      I have been put off by several people about publishers and self publishing as your idea can be stolen by more experienced authors. 

      Is Lulu a good place to publish?

      1. profile image0
        Website Examinerposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Take your time, be sure not to put something in print before it has been well-edited and proofread. You need favorable critiques to market your book, which you will not get if there are too many errors.

        I don't see any concern about "idea theft" for a published book. Copyright registration is not legally required, but as a precaution can be acquired easily for a modest fee. Ideas are never legally protected, the only way is to keep your work a total secret.

        Lulu provides free ISBN numbers and a relatively attractive publishing interface. You can publish without paying anything up front. They can also give you some distribution channels. However, their marketing support is very limited, and being on Lulu will make it obvious that you have decided to self-publish. Amazon's Create Space and others may offer lower printing costs.

      2. Marisa Wright profile image93
        Marisa Wrightposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        If you're worried about people stealing your work, then you should be more worried about posting it on HubPages than publishing it in a book!

        What is your motive for publishing it on HP?  It's not an effective way to make money from it, because readers have no reason to click on the ads (which likely won't be relevant anyway).  If you just want feedback from other writers to improve the work, there are better places - sites specifically designed for that purpose - here are some ideas:

        http://www.writersdigest.com/101BestSit … nYear=2008

        The only way HP is good for a novella or novel is as a promotional tool - post your first chapter as a 'teaser' and refer people to Amazon or your self-publisher to buy it.

        I've written a couple of Hubs on this subject.

    14. profile image0
      Website Examinerposted 6 years ago

      Marisa Wright, you and I are on the same page, so to speak.

      1. Marisa Wright profile image93
        Marisa Wrightposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        We usually are, WE!

        1. Ian Hudson profile image67
          Ian Hudsonposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Thank you for your guidance, I feel more confident about the future of my book.
          I will look into the cost of getting copies printed, then look into selling them on Amazon. Once I have got the ball rolling I will post the first chapter as a Hub.

          I hope other people  find this information useful. smile

    15. profile image0
      ryankettposted 6 years ago

      Rather than posting it on the internet, where it can be stolen, probably won't be noticed, and certainly won't make you much money, why not perfect the develop the story further or perfect your work and then approach publishers with a manuscript?

      Posting fiction online has to be seen as a failure in a certain respect, It would be better served staying on your hard drive or in a folder.

      What happens if you decide to write another children's book some day? And your publisher turns round and says "that was great, what else do you have ready?".

      I have two completed non-fiction books on a computer, just sitting there, they have been for a year. I could publish them online, but I can publish other stuff online, if you believe that your work is of a good enough standard then don't sell out cheaply. That applies more to fiction than non-fiction, seeing as the former should be timeless and the latter generally needs to be updated regularly.

      I have been compiling pages and pages of notes on publishers, submission requirements, and such like.... those books will be sent to those. Never, ever, will they be published online... they can sit there until a publisher turns around and says "what else have you got for us".

    16. Mark Ewbie profile image83
      Mark Ewbieposted 6 years ago

      I didn't wrote a book yet, but I feel I have one inside me.  Although I did have a heavy lunch.

      1. profile image0
        Website Examinerposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Judged by your appearances, it must be an ebook.

        1. Mark Ewbie profile image83
          Mark Ewbieposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Nice one WE.

          1. profile image0
            Website Examinerposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            Thanks, an intellectual lightweight you are not.

     
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