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How do you get rid of airborne spores and toxins after killing black mold on hou

  1. Kylyssa profile image97
    Kylyssaposted 2 years ago

    How do you get rid of airborne spores and toxins after killing black mold on household surfaces?

    My friend found a colony of black mold hiding between the wall and toilet tank of her bathroom after using her bathroom gave me an asthma attack. She's killed all of the mold on surfaces. A week later, I still can't go into her bathroom without having an asthma attack and she is coughing and sneezing when she uses it though not as much as before. It seems like the airborne spores, toxins, and whatever else the mold was giving off are still lingering, despite running her ceiling fan constantly.

    How can she get rid of or neutralize whatever's left in the air after killing mold on surfaces?

  2. RTalloni profile image88
    RTalloniposted 2 years ago

    Check into products from Benefect's line.  Contacting the company might be useful.

    1. Kylyssa profile image97
      Kylyssaposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you. I'll look into their products and see if they have some information on getting the high density of spores out of the air.

  3. cat on a soapbox profile image99
    cat on a soapboxposted 2 years ago

    I would think a portable air scrubber w/  a HEPA filter would clear the toxins from the air. They can be rented. Try Home Depot or Lowe's. When we had water damage under our kitchen floor, the mitigation company brought them in.

    1. Kylyssa profile image97
      Kylyssaposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you. It's good to know she can rent one while deciding which one to buy.

  4. tsmog profile image83
    tsmogposted 2 years ago

    How did she kill off the mold? If it penetrated the wall it may have to be replaced because it may be growing on the other side? The spores are still present. Surface mold is best obliterated after scrubbing, using bleach over and over allowing it to penetrate the drywall, and then repainting sometimes with another coat. (Insert disclaimer here)

    Once in an apartment I lived there was black mold present on the drywall above the tile in the shower. Mainly along the juncture where they met in the crevice. Old construction too. No matter how many times I scrubbed, treated with bleach, and painted it returned within the year. Part of the affect of steam I would imagine. The problem was there was mold behind the tile. A retrofit fiberglass shower stall was installed after the drywall was replaced.

    So, you may ask her to check for where steam accumulates as water in the bathroom. If it does so at that location perhaps it may be behind the wall. Remember moisture forms on surfaces where heat and cold meet too. That can attribute to the inside wall too if that wall borders the outside in a cold winter environment without insulation. (A hint as a minder is watch out for the tea kettle and its steam direction. A good reason to run the vent fan when steaming.)

    1. Kylyssa profile image97
      Kylyssaposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      I know little other than that cleaning was taken to extremes and involved a mask and goggles. If it's in the wall, that has to be dealt with. Thank you for all this great info!

  5. Stella Kaye profile image89
    Stella Kayeposted 2 years ago

    Ventilation and effective drying out will help immensely. Reducing the humidity in the home will decrease the likelihood of any re-occurrence.

    Read the following article for more information:

    http://hubpages.com/living/banishing_mould

    1. Kylyssa profile image97
      Kylyssaposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you for answering. The hub is extremely basic and doesn't mention anything about clearing spores and leftover air-borne fumes after the mold has been cleaned up and dried out.

    2. Stella Kaye profile image89
      Stella Kayeposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Kylyssa if you ventilate correctly and tackle the condensation issue,  spores in the air will have nothing to live on and will die. No further treatment will be needed.  Wash walls with  fungicidal wash and use mold inhibiting paint when redecorating

 
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