This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: "https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr"

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)
jump to last post 1-4 of 4 discussions (4 posts)

Why do people stiff their server in a nice restaurant?

  1. cyclrmom profile image74
    cyclrmomposted 7 years ago

    Why do people stiff their server in a nice restaurant?

    servers have to tip out to bus-ers and the bar on the total dollars of food sold.  If diners have not tipped correctly or at all, the server basically had to pay to serve the table that didn't tip them.  If the food was bad, tell management, but your server didn't cause that.  If people can't afford to eat in a nice restaurant and have money leftover for a tip, they shouldn't eat there in my opinion.

  2. Mom Kat profile image79
    Mom Katposted 7 years ago

    I was a waitress for about 5 years when I was younger.
    What I noticed was that those who don't tip, or don't tip well have different reasons:
    1. they don't have enough cash/money to do so.
    2. they had to wait a long time either to sit, or for their food.
    3. they were by other customers who upset them (too loud, or what have you - making their experience poor)
    4. they just don't consider tipping to be important - figuring they pay for the food, that should be enough since wait staff get a pay check. They don't really understand the scale.
    5. they had a rude or unfriendly waitress/waiter
    the list goes on.  the best thing you can do as a server is to be as nice as possible, appologize if food is taking too long, check back, and be the best server you can be.

  3. DzyMsLizzy profile image96
    DzyMsLizzyposted 7 years ago

    Im my opinion, a better question would be, why don't we abolish tipping, and let the restaurants, hotels, etc. simply pay their staff a livable wage?

    It would make no difference in the final out-of-pocket cost to the customers--whether they have to figure out the amount of a tip, and pay that on top of the bill, or whether the prices go up to cover a proper wage, it's all the same in the end.

    I do tip, but I base it less on the amount of the bill than upon the type of service I have received.  If the server went over-and-above, yes, they will be very pleased with their tip.  If, however, they did nothing more than take my order, and let it be served to me by a busser or some other staffer, I will not feel they've earned a tip.  Servers should SERVE, and if they do not, it WILL BE reflected in the size of the tip I leave.  If all they did was take my order & bring the check, I won't feel that they did their job in SERVING.

    Bussers wear aprons, not always the cleanest, understandable, given the majority of their job description.  Thanks, though, I'd rather not have them handling my food order in proximity to that apron--and how do I know they washed their hands after the last table they bussed?

    Tipping aggravates me, as an outdated and 'expected' practice.  The original meaning of "tip" in that sense was an acronym, meaning, "To Insure Promptness."  It was given prior to service, not after, and was not dependent upon the amount of the tab.  It was rather more like slipping the Maitre d' a bill of some significant denomination to assure seating at a preferred table.

    The fact that the servers have to split their tips with bartenders and bussers is just wrong (and is not the customer's fault).  Pay the people a living wage, adjust prices accordingly, and everyone will be happy.  As it stands, the whole system is too complex, from customers having to figure the tip to servers having to figure out their splits, all the way up to filing their income tax reports.

    You have to work hard at something to make it this complicated.  Simplify and relax!  ;-)

  4. dashingscorpio profile image87
    dashingscorpioposted 7 years ago

    I normally tip around 20%. However if the service was not great I'd probably tip less. I don't think I've ever stiffed a server.
    Having said that I would imagine there are proably few reasons why some people might not tip.

    1. Dreadful service (food arrived cold, server unfriendly or rude)

    2. Quality of food is disappointing.
    (It's not the servers fault but he/she is the face of the restaurant)
    In other lines of business a Sales Rep or Customer Service employee catches hell for product issues or shipping delays that's not their fault. The customer doesn't care whose fault it is they just want things to go as expected. (That's Life)

    3. Lack of funds or not enough worth leaving behind.
    Most of the time these days people use a credit card in nice restaurants so there is no real excuse for being short on cash.

    Having said that there are times in "group situations" where no one wants to volunteer to foot the bill on their card and collect the money later....etc. Everyone puts in their cash to cover their meals. Natuarlly some people ordered drinks and others didn't or some ordered salads and others ordered steak....etc

    Those who ordered less don't think it's fair to divide the bill equally nor do they want to tip beyond the normal percentage they would have had they had their own bill.
    The tip money they leave gets swallowed up to help cover the more expensive meals/drink orders.

    Sometimes people have different policies. One person never tips, another only tips at 10%, someone else may tip 15% and the total works out to being some embarrassingly low dollar amount that they decide to just walk out.

    Lastly there are people who take all of the cash and put the dinner on their credit card but don't leave a tip. No one else knows if he/she left a tip when the credit card slip is signed.

    (I try to avoid group dinners!)

 
working