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jump to last post 1-5 of 5 discussions (5 posts)

Is Property Tax an oxymoron?

  1. PhoenixV profile image69
    PhoenixVposted 18 months ago

    Is Property Tax an oxymoron?

    Property is a possession. Property taxes seems more like renting. A rental does not seem like a possession.

  2. Chuck profile image91
    Chuckposted 18 months ago

    In a way property taxes are a little like rent in that the tax is an ongoing payment that the owner is required to pay or face penalties up to and including the government taking the property and selling it to collect the back taxes.

    The most common type of property tax today is the real estate property tax which is based upon the value of the land and improvements (buildings and any other physical improvements that are unmovable).  Real estate property taxes are a major (often the major) source of tax revenue for local governments and smaller jurisdictions such as school districts.  However, county, state and even the Federal Government can, and in some cases do, levy property taxes on real estate.

    Failure to pay property taxes can result in the real estate being taken by the governmental jurisdiction levying the tax and sold to collect the unpaid taxes. 

    In many jurisdictions the unpaid taxes rather than the property itself are sold.  In this case the unpaid taxes are paid by an outside buyer who usually purchases the taxes at a tax auction held by the taxing entity.  In return for paying the unpaid taxes, the buyer receives a lien on the property which makes it nearly impossible for the owner of the property to obtain or refinance a mortgage or other type of loan using the property as collateral as the holder of the lien is entitled to a refund of the taxes he paid (and, depending on the laws of the state, may also be able to collect interest on the amount he paid for the taxes) when the property is sold.  Further, the owner of the tax lien is legally entitled to be paid first out of the sale proceeds leaving what, if any, funds left for other lenders and the seller.

  3. tamarawilhite profile image92
    tamarawilhiteposted 18 months ago

    No, it is a tax on the property with the threat they take it if you don't pay it. It isn't rent paid to a landlord though it feels like it.

  4. The0NatureBoy profile image44
    The0NatureBoyposted 18 months ago

    I say yes because it is actually your renting the earth from someone without ANY authority to do it, the same with the purchasing of unharvested food since the plants grow by their own ability to reproduce so every life type will have substance to sustain themselves; processed food is another story.

  5. Ericdierker profile image53
    Ericdierkerposted 18 months ago

    About four blocks away in the city of San Diego you need a business license to operate. Once a year they tax things like filing cabinets and a phone system and computers and desks. Here in the county and not a city we have no such taxes. Generally for the same home and real estate we also pay lower taxes because homes around here are partially valued by distance and convenience to working in the city.
    Around here though the owner is taxed on real estate and buildings -- it is perfectly legal to pass that cost onto the tenant of a rental. So in truth the renter actually pays for the tax.
    A fact that is worth noting is that county schools versus city schools are not even comparable because county and small municipality schools are so much better. And that is directly related to the real estate tax which is assessed and collected by our county which is extremely effective and efficient with out the further taxing by the city.
    This year there were something like ten ballot proposals for increasing taxes for the city. And zero for the county.
    So here there is no debate that it is not the tax that really matters, but far more important is the efficiency of the local government.

 
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