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jump to last post 1-6 of 6 discussions (9 posts)

Frugal Living - Settings for the Heat and Air Conditioning

  1. GmaGoldie profile image80
    GmaGoldieposted 6 years ago

    In an ongoing effort to retain valuable funds and live frugally, I am searching for the best temperatures for our home. Right now we are keeping it at 69 during winter and 74 during the summer and turning it manually at night. I wish to computerize this process but haven't yet researched the controls. I have shut off the upstairs and closely monitored the temperature and now I am seeking to make the basement more efficient.

    What temperature do you keep your home or apartment at? Is winter different from summer. Why have you chosen that temperature? Do you have different zones? Have you considered different zones?

    1. IzzyM profile image89
      IzzyMposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Pity you put the words 'frugal living' into this heading, because perhaps people when they are hard up cannot afford to run either air conditioning or central heating.
      Neither are especially economical to run, especially then they heat/cool more than one room at once, regardless of what temperature they are set to.
      If you have money to spare, but money is tight most of the time, you are better off using your finances to insulate your home thoroughly, that way you will require less heating/cooling no matter the weather outside.

      1. couturepopcafe profile image60
        couturepopcafeposted 6 years agoin reply to this

        I hear you. I've shut off one of my four rooms, sleep with 4 blankets, and feel the chill.

    2. Robie Benve profile image99
      Robie Benveposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Electronic programmable thermostats are great for saving money on heating and cooling.  And so is dressing for the season.
      I have different temperatures programmed for different times of the day and different days of the week.
      In Winter I wear sweaters or sweatshirts, and socks, in summer I wear shorts and t-shirts.
      I also have a two zone thermostat, I keep the upstairs always less comfortable, because we are rarely there.
      my temps are (average)
      max 69 min 65 in winter (I'd like it 63 at night, but the setting does not go below 65, bummer!)
      max ??, min 78 in summer - the main reason for air conditioning is getting the humidity out, I don't like it to be too "cold".

      I agree insulation is extremely important for saving energy.

  2. Pearldiver profile image78
    Pearldiverposted 6 years ago

    I live Frugally Too sad

    But hey... you are Way Outta My League! smile

    Having good insulation in Winter is pretty important - so I wear 4 pairs of socks and make sure that I keep the Flaps Down as much as possible! smile

    Lately it hasn't been such a problem as I don't need socks anymore! After my box got frozen and the lid tore off in the wind, my feet got frost bit and eventually taken off sad

    So yeah... can't complain... there are 1000s of others in a worse situation; but sadly no bankers! sad

    Besides.. it could have been worse.. at least I didn't totally lose my dignity and I've got a window in my home now.. and hey on the frugal side.. I can save a few pennies on shoes! smile

    This has been a real message for politicians.. from those who were screwed by bent bankers and brokers and can't speak for themselves!

  3. WriteAngled profile image82
    WriteAngledposted 6 years ago

    I do not need air conditioning. On the rare occasions when it is very hot in Wales, I find my house keeps nicely cool.

    I do need heating in winter. I keep the thermostat set to 61 degrees F during the day and 43 F at night.

    I have chosen this setting, because it is the lowest at which I do not feel cold.

    I do not have different zones, because my house is small, not all the rooms have doors, and I like my cats to have access throughout.

    Naturally, I wear several layers of clothing in the house, and when sitting still often drape a blanket over my legs. I also have a thin silk coverlet over my duvet and find this makes all the difference to being beautifully warm at night.

    When I first used these settings, I ended up having to wear a hat and fingerless gloves indoors as well. However, this is now my third winter living in these temperatures, and I am finding that often I feel too warm and need to remove layers!

  4. Pearldiver profile image78
    Pearldiverposted 6 years ago

    Cheers.... I'm glad you agreed with me on the value of Insulation smile
    Did you lose your feet as well from the cold? yikes

    I am constantly amazed at how thoughtless cupboard boxmakers are today...
    you know... very few of them are prepared to help us homeless blokes with proper insulation! 
    It gets pretty cold out there in winter parking your bed under the apartment central heating outlets, when all you have for a blanket is plastic bubble wrap! sad 
    Hell you're afraid to move in fear of popping your lot and it's far worse if you want the girlfriend to stay over and she squeezes the blankie in her sleep! smile

  5. paradigmsearch profile image90
    paradigmsearchposted 6 years ago

    As to winter, sweatpants and sweatshirts are darned comfortable. The thermostat is under 70 during the day and under 60 during the night.

    As to summer, swamp coolers are the way to go.

  6. MakinBacon profile image82
    MakinBaconposted 6 years ago

    It's impossible to give an optimum temperature, because even in my house, my spouse and I have two different comfort levels. If you're single, that of course is irrelevant.

    For us, we open the windows in the summer months and let the breeze flow through, when there is one. We have trees surrounding the home, so we have fantastic relief from the hot sun.

    As for winter, on the days above freezing, we usually will use a small, ceramic heater, which is very low cost.

    I also use an electric blanket when I first go to bed, and that heats things up very quickly, and for the rest of the night I'm toasty. Those bathroom breaks are cool though;-)

 
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