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There Was A Time So Very Long Ago: A Moment With Bill Reflection

Updated on February 13, 2014

A Dedication

I write this for those who understood. I write this for those who believed in the dream. I write this for those to defended freedoms and for those who paid for them with their lives. “There Was A Time” is written for my father, my grandfather, uncles, aunts, grandmothers, and those who even came before them, the survivors of world wars, the survivors of horrendous economic depressions, the believers in a fair shake and a square deal.

I write this for them….and I write this for us. Hopefully we will one day understand the truths we were once taught.

So very long ago
So very long ago | Source

There Was a Time

Up at dawn, rain or shine, sleet or snow, winter, summer, spring and fall, twenty-four, seven, three-sixty-five, it is all the same. Feed the flock, milk the herd, crank up the old tractor and ready the tools. Gotta get that hay cut before the rains and Lord knows when those bastards will be pouring down on us. They say two days but there’s three days of crops out there and no extra hands. Skipping meals and drinking their weight in water as the late summer sun beats down upon them; row after row cut and baled, cut and bale, cut and bale, back and forth and to and fro, the dust rising and the wind carrying it across that flat country, no wind breaks, nothing to stop it from drifting across borders and falling down like brown manna from hell.

Then turn your attention to the next crop, and the next, one harvest after another into late September, then pour it into the trucks, haul it to the silos, hoping the price hasn’t dropped below the break-even line. It all depends on price, the buy and sell, the supply and demand, in Iowa, Nebraska and Kansas, all setting the tables in Los Angeles, New York and Atlanta, housewives and singles picking and squeezing and looking for the best product at the best price and complaining all the way to the checkout stand.

Below that line and you go broke; bank comes and auctions happen and families plowed under with the stubble. Above that line and you live to farm another year, 365 more days of backbreaking toil and turmoil, the legacy passed down from immigrants who crossed The Pond and brought with them a love of the land and a natural distrust of the government. Hope for the best, expect the worst, and just hope to hell your kids have a better life because dammit, brother, this land will break a man….but it is honest work, work born from a deep respect for the land and a belief that hard work builds character and rewards a man, and woman, who is willing to make the effort.

The price was paid
The price was paid | Source

There Was a Time

Months at sea, disgorged onto that tiny island, Lady Liberty singing her praises and welcoming all, the Irish, the Italians, the Swedes and the Finns. The Land of Opportunity welcomes all, as long as All can carry their weight and are willing to sacrifice damn near everything for the American Dream. Shirkers are not welcome in Shangrila, for fortunes are not made on the backs of the lazy.

The factories are waiting, boys, so step right this way and follow that man; he’ll take you to Detroit, Pittsburg, Chicago and Erie, and there you will find ten, twelve hours day, tough days, rough days, under the artificial lights of the great industrial complex, raw materials to finished product, gotta feed the demand, gotta satisfy the need, gotta keep this giant growing and growing. No education needed my friends, just a strong back and a willingness to make your country proud. You are now a part of something important, so build those Fords and crank out those refrigerators, tighten that bolt there and turn that hub there, it all matters and you all matter and at the end of fifty we’ll give you a shiny new watch and a pat on the back for a job well done.

Bone-tired at the end of the week, they shuffle off to the neighborhoods, Little Italy and German Town, where they barbecue with family and hoist a few at the local tavern. Weekends are for chores while the ballgame plays on the little radio out back, and evenings are for sitting on the stoop and watching life play out scenes of yesterday, today and the future.

And the future is for your little ones going to college and having more, resting more, enjoying more, working a damn sight less than dad and granddad, that would make all the hardships worth it, if Little Johnny and Sweet Little Jane didn’t have to work the factories and buy day-old bread at the discount store.

For our lifestyle today
For our lifestyle today | Source

There Was a Time

Deep in the bowels of the Earth; off you go now; hop on that rail car and into the tunnel and pray to your god that you see the sunshine at the end of the day. Switch on those lamps, hoist that pick, chip away, chip away, dig out that ore because America is waiting and we need to keep America happy.

The Scots and the Irish lads, the Poles and the Slavs, they all look the same to the industrial machine. Shore up those timbers me boys; we lost a dozen yesterday and we don’t need no repeat. Breathe in that dust me boys, and hack out those lungs, black in color and void of hope, and if you can’t do the work there’s more where you came from.

There’s not much hope for the boys of darkness. A small paycheck at the end of the month, the constant aches and pains, the dreamless sleep at the end of each day, a little whiskey, or a lot of whiskey, to help you forget County Cork and the green, rolling hills of yesterday.

There Was a Time

I’ve been working on the railroad, all the live long day. Dangerous work it is, laying the track, dynamiting new routes, pounding those spikes; the weak need not apply as the country spreads its arms and moves west, following Manifest Destiny to the setting sun.

A mountain in the way? Blast it out of there or tunnel through it, makes no difference as long as those tracks are laid down. Those little Chinese fellers are tough; gotta give them their due. Feed them some stew, toss twenty cents per day their way, and they head on out each morning to lay another quarter mile, no complaining, no whining, not when you consider where they came from and what they had to endure just to get to this Paradise.

Pound in that golden spike and connect the two oceans, and there is no stopping us now, friends, because America is just too strong, too big, too ambitious to let natural obstacles stall progress, and if a few lives are lost then so be it; that’s just the price to be paid for a place in history.

Some Final Thoughts

We owe it all to those who came before us. Their blood, their sweat, their tears and yes, their deaths, paved the way for future generations. The lifestyle we now enjoy came with a heavy cost and we had best not forget it. The luxuries we now take for granted came with a price tag and it was a steep price indeed.

Would our ancestors be proud if they were alive today? Would they look out over the landscape of America and swell with the glow of satisfaction, or would they cringe? Is this the better life that our forefathers wished for their children? Is this the American Dream that they sacrificed for? Do we even care? Do we even appreciate what came before us, or do we look upon the bounty as what is owed to us by our birthright?

There was a time so very long ago.

2014 William D. Holland (aka billybuc)

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    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Michael my friend, eloquent as always. Man was not meant to be ruled....limited...constrained....the power of the people should not be limited but rather encouraged to grow....as a group and individually. One day I hope to see a society where that is nurtured and not locked in chains.

      blessings always

      bill

    • Michael-Milec profile image

      Michael-Milec 3 years ago

      Oh Bill, -hi - I suppose… not only easier life as deviation from an established source of wisdom. See, the foundation, origin of true wisdom comes from-- actually mere beginning of the wisdom for further growth and unending development comes from a reverential affection for the Creator a fiducial fear of Him a fear of offending so good a Being as He is. During those ancient times when I have begun inhaling life the world was less polluted by the multiple choices of rebellion against man's duty to live, to provide and to increase by own initiative according the talents received. . . Naturally, there was desire to create and produce more even by those who for some reason had easer life. . .

      … Debacle of our days has been carefully planed decades earlier by educated nonproductive parasites who openly declared themselves as "Supreme "…. rulers -- acting as if unambiguous…

      Choices are being made as always , by individuals--and I would never understand why evil owns so many souls…Meanwhile I remain consistent injecting the sole truth from which springs wisdom, increasing into knowledge and understanding of divine will for man to have good success ' prosperity and blessing, following His design. His will.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Happy Sunday Michael my friend, and once again you stated it perfectly. "Wiser though less educated"....oh yes indeed. The easier life has become the less wise we have become. Do you suppose there is a correlation there?

      Thank you for a wonderful reflection. Blessings to you today and always.

      bill

    • Michael-Milec profile image

      Michael-Milec 3 years ago

      Hello Bill.

      A history of how " we became" America's famous for success and prosperity? Indeed. You've done it as a real TEACHER in nutshell a lesson for every first -grader to memorize and to remember, the way when our ancestors , while wiser though less "educated " didn't wanted to be outdone by the other creatures: They make their babies, build their nests, teach their youngsters to catch the worm for early as a home-made breakfast,teaching them to be efficient when their turn comes to build a "better future ". Instinctively ?! Perhaps. We are most blessed generation remembering those days when our grand parents and parents by their own hands created everything they need and wanted to have. We had little, comparing to todays standard we had nothing after we finished meal, but we had will to continue sowing and reaping, raising chicks, and feeding pigs for best sausages as only heaven knows, milking the cow and step by step have fresh milk , milk products, some put aside for market so that we can have taste of sugar,or once a year peace of chocolate … We were happy and content…

      This hub is perfect reminder who we are now, a bit older-wiser - experienced- and willing to extend helping hand to those we love, having all toys satisfying modern appetite , in pursue for happiness where can't be achieved… Seems to me, the wisdom replaced by education where the initiative for creativity is disregarded can't make us proud neither our ancestors would be proud at all if they would live today.

      Voted up, useful,beautiful and interesting.

      Happy Sunday my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Deb, I love your line "there is no entitlement here".....we need more people to realize that. Work hard, play hard, and reduce our footprints on this Earth. Thanks for your thoughts.

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      Deb Hirt 3 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      Yes, those WERE the times, and there are the same times for others. It all depends on what you want to have in your wallet to feed your families, clothe them, and have a roof over your head. The American Dream ain't dead, laddies, it is still around the bend. Just work for it, for there is no entitlement here, just living.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Brandi, what a great memory to have and tell to your kids. I swear, I never lacked for things to do when I was growing up. I was on the go constantly ...barefoot, playing ball, riding bikes, laying underneath the willow tree and watching the clouds blow by....there is indeed a separation and hopefully the gap won't increase. Thank you for sharing that.

    • CraftytotheCore profile image

      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      My grandmother used to say she would run barefoot to a coal train in the hills of West Virginia on snowy days in December. It was Christmas. The coal train would pass by the small mining town annually and throw oranges and apples to all of the children who were lucky to get that.

      From generation to generation there is a separation for the respect that young people today need to have and understand about those that came before them.

      My children can't believe I didn't have a computer until I was a teenager. They tell me that I must have had a boring life. They can't imagine living on a farm and how splendid summer nights felt on my bare feet walking around the gresh green grass after a day of reading a book in the sunshine outside.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Anna! I believe this is a problem globally for sure....maybe not in the 3rd world countries but definitely in the industrialized ones.

    • Anna Haven profile image

      Anna Haven 3 years ago from Scotland

      Not being from the US I don't feel I can really comment very much, but I felt your sentiment, frustration and even that shake of your head as you wrote...and I understand on a global level.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      PS, angels have arrived and they are appreciated dear friend. Thank you! We never give up on America, do we? No we don't.

      hugs and blessings coming your way

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Dianna! I hope the current generation doesn't have to live through a Great Depression; I'm not sure they are made of the right stuff to do it.

    • pstraubie48 profile image

      Patricia Scott 3 years ago from sunny Florida

      O, yes, we do care...some of us do. And we won't give up on our America....we will make sense out of this ....we will overcome the challenges we face and we will do because of those who came before us.

      Keep on shaking the bushes, bill; keep on making us think and hopefully moving to try to make a difference.

      Angels are on the way to you ps

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      Dianna Mendez 3 years ago

      We should give our respect to the overcomers, those who proceeded us and made a path for our success. I loved hearing my mom tell me stories of her struggle through the depression. The trials made her stronger and wise. I hope that our present day society overcomes the current hardships to provide a better future for our grandchildren.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Rachel, thanks for adding your two cents worth...farming still legal? Interesting phrase....the government has certainly made an effort of late to "outlaw" the small farmer. Let's hope we can change the trend my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Timetraveler2, it is sad. All I can do is raise awareness and hope other listen. Thank you for your reflections.

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      Rachel Koski 3 years ago from Minnesota

      Cringe, shake their heads, or feel the stab of jealousy? I'm not sure. They say the world only spins forward, and I suppose they're right. For those of us who need more than modern luxuries can offer, thank god there's still affordable land in the US and farming's still legal. :) Nice hub, Bill, as always.

    • TIMETRAVELER2 profile image

      TIMETRAVELER2 3 years ago

      You and I are not far away in age, and we both remember what some of those times were like. We had less, but life was so very much better. I'm afraid we've ruined it all, Bill, even though there still are some out there who give it a good shot. It is so terribly sad.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Mary, I hope by raising awareness a great many wrongs can be righted; otherwise I am wasting my time as a writer and I don't want to believe that. Thank you for caring my friend.

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      Mary Craig 3 years ago from New York

      Yes, there WAS a time. Unfortunately society today does NOT appreciate the work they do and many do not have the hardship and foresight to want MORE for their children. So many have settled into the status quo. Working is just that, there is no more working hard or honest ambition.

      Hopefully people like you will help change that, at least for some which may stretch into many.

      Voted up, useful, awesome, interesting, and shared.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      breakfastpop, we are on the same page. I am sixty-six now and I don't recognize this country. It is based on the same principles as when I was young, but the reality of the situation is much, much different. I'm sorry to see it and as long as I can write I'm going to sound the alarm. Thank you for your thoughts which are right on.

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      breakfastpop 3 years ago

      I do not believe that those who paved the way for us would be proud to see what is happening today. Our freedoms are being trampled on along with the Constitution. Hard work is de-valued and the government invests our taxes in campaigns telling people that food stamps are nothing to be ashamed of. My ancestors worked hard to better themselves and make a better life for their family. They possessed a strong work ethic and a love of country. Each day, all I see is an erosion of those values. Up, interesting, useful and awesome.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      And well said you you, Mark! What an honor it is to know writers like you, good people, supportive, loving....I am blessed my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      You are very welcome, vkwok...thank you!

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      Mark G Weller 3 years ago from Lake Charles, LA.

      It was late afternoon when Joe got to the edge of the city, The sun was low in the sky and the colors were painting the clouds high above him. Behind him, the noise and rush of city life continued with an abandon. The stink of exhaust and the noise of the traffic horrendous.

      Ahead he looked, the trail led off to the west into the setting sun. His foot steps sounded softly as the gravel crunched beneath his boots. One step at a time, one foot in front of the other, Joes thoughts were far away.

      Well said Bill.

    • vkwok profile image

      Victor W. Kwok 3 years ago from Hawaii

      Thanks for sharing this amazing hub, Bill!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      DDE, somewhere along the way we turned from struggle to convenience, and I think we lost something when we made that turn. There is nothing wrong with struggle....if nothing else it builds character. Thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jo, thank you for your thoughts. It's always about perspective now isn't it. Oh yes, there was good and bad then....the good old days were rarely all good. Have a great weekend and thank you for your kind words.

      bill

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      Devika Primić 3 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      Times have changed and people experience lives differently in modern times and don't want to feel that struggle that was once felt by their ancestors. One should be more appreciated now with what they have another great hub from you.

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      Jo Alexis-Hagues 3 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K

      Bill, very inspirational! I think your ancestors would be both proud and horrified to see what became of their legacy. There's a lot of truth in what you've written, those old folks were indeed tough, and courageous, they achieved the impossible, We could learn much from them, but we must also remember, just as there are good and bad now, there were good and bad then. Great tribute to your parents. Another excellent piece, though-provoking and beautifully done.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Amazing, Faith! That was dangerous work for sure!

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Audrey, I am honored that you are sharing this with your grandchildren. Thank you my dear friend.

      love,

      bill

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      Faith Reaper 3 years ago from southern USA

      Oh, and his other grandfather on his mother's side worked in a lumber yard, the old fashioned way, and he lived to be about 95 and when one would go to give him a hug, he was just as solid as a rock! All those years of lifting lumber seemed to have never left his body. He eventually owned his own lumber yard.

      Blessings,

      Faith Reaper

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      Audrey Hunt 3 years ago from Nashville Tn.

      Both of my grandparents were immigrants, one of them from Scotland. They worked in coal mines until they died - long before I was born. My grandmother helped to lift heavy logs as she worked alongside my grandfather building their small log cabin. They sacrificed and gave their lives to help build a better country for their children and grandchildren. I am ashamed at what their (our) country has become.

      I'm passing this outstanding hub of yours on to my grandchildren to show them how it used to be. This is your best Bill! ~ Love, Audrey

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Faith! I grew up with stories of work so hard it would break a normal man today; stories of riding trains looking for work, travelling hundreds of miles in search of an odd job.....I am convinced that America can regain its position of stature but it must be on the backs of hardworking people who deserve a chance.

      blessings always

      bill

    • Faith Reaper profile image

      Faith Reaper 3 years ago from southern USA

      When I drive through certain parts of big cities and see nothing but huge empty buildings on large lots of land for miles, I cringe at the thought that it could be great farm land or beautiful forests still, and now it is just a bunch of ugly concrete sitting there that no one wants to buy! If we did not send all of our work out to other countries to do, maybe we could go back to being the America that built great things with our hands? My husband's grandmother (God rest her soul) and grandfather on his dad's side of the family had 13 children, who all worked at a very young age in the cotton fields from sun up to sundown. The railroad comes through my little town here, and I do see when they are out there repairing it, such hard work indeed.

      Beautiful dedication.

      Blessings,

      Faith Reaper

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Genna! That means a great deal to me. :)

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      Genna East 3 years ago from Massachusetts, USA

      I forgot to mention that I loved your dedication!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Genna, I know for a fact that my ancestors would cringe. They would be astounded by the technology and horribly depressed by the lack of progress. :) I think you understand that. Thank you for your reflections.

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      Genna East 3 years ago from Massachusetts, USA

      Would our ancestors be proud if they were alive today? Would they look out over the landscape of America and swell with the glow of satisfaction, or would they cringe?

      Cringe…at least I know that mine would.

      On my mother’s side, they came to these shores in 'The Little James' in 1623 to the early Plymouth Colony. When I read with pride the stories of their sacrifices and hard work throughout the generations, I sometimes find myself wishing a fantasy that I lived in earlier days. They wanted something better for their children, grandchildren, and so on. I think they would be impressed with certain aspects of modern culture, but horrified and ashamed of many others.

      Excellent hub, Bill.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      DJ, that is a fairly common mistake so give yourself some slack. I do that all the time in my novel. I am constantly checking to make sure I haven't said something earlier. Some people use online applications that are like a giant outline and you plug information into every chapter...I don't have the patience to do that, so I pay the price because of my memory. It would be much harder writing about a war with all the separate battles. Carry on and congrats on the 60,000.

      bill

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      DJ Anderson 3 years ago

      Congrats on 100,000 words!!! That is super, Bill!!!

      I am sitting right at 60, 000. If I can ever find the right conflict for my

      character and get out of WWII, I will be over the top happy.

      I got up raring to work on the book this morning. Had to do some more

      research on Japanese history, wrote several pages of notes, typed about

      a page and thought, that sounds awfully familiar. Scrolled back about

      12 pages and found where I had already typed that information.

      Do you know how many military scrimmages are with Japan, alone?

      I am having to go through every one of them to find what I need.

      No, I do not have a memory. I've been so angry I could bite myself!!

      DJ.

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Brian, I'm not sure I'm supposed to be laughing, so excuse me, but you had me howling with your comment. Damn, pass down some wisdom, would ya? LOL No kidding, Brian. I wish my dad were alive today so I could sit down with him and find out if he really knew what he was talking about. LOL Thank you for the laugh and your kind words at the end.

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Aww, Ann, thank you! No comment is as good as the one that says "perhaps your best yet." That tells me I am improving and for that I am grateful. Lest we forget....I suspect many have already forgotten in this country and I find that profoundly sad. I know what my father had to give up and we can multiply him by millions the world round. Sigh!

      I hope you write those stories one day, Ann. I, for one, look forward to them.

      Enjoy your evening my friend.

      bill

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      Brian Prickril 3 years ago from Savannah, GA

      Bill, I come from a long line of hard working people. It's like they just kept handing it off right on down the line. Nobody tried to stop me from a life of insanity. They were proud of the fact that I was squashing my nuts in a factory. I know It's not very patriotic of me to complain about my opportunity to get beat up like the tough men who came before me. But damn, pass down some wisdom, would ya? We all have to go out and work are butts off and earn but there's better ways to go about things, am I wrong? I am grateful for all I have and all I've been given. And I understand the value of hard work. But along with these traits of hard work and honesty, let's make sure we're handing down some intelligence to any young people who are dear to us. The giant will always be the giant. That doesn't mean we have to keep getting our teeth kicked in generation after generation. Amen.

      p.s. That was a beautiful piece of writing you did there.

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      Ann Carr 3 years ago from SW England

      I love this to bits. The dedication is beautiful. Our ancestors did indeed work hard for a better future for themselves and for their children. Would they like what exists today? Some of it I'm sure but certainly there's plenty they'd be looking at aghast and thinking 'what on earth has happened here?'

      'Lest we forget', eh? Sadly, we forget all too easily. We don't learn from the past, we don't appreciate what has been done to make our lives easier and some better because we're still devastating other people's lives, we're still being unjust, unkind, cold and callous.

      I know many family stories and I'll try to tell them one day when I can stop crying as I write them.

      This is perhaps your best yet; it's powerful and it makes us ask questions. A great hub on which to end my hubbing day; off to watch some favourite tv. See you tomorrow I expect, bill. Ann

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Marlene, it was my pleasure to write this. I am so grateful for my ancestors and the sacrifices they made....I don't ever want to take my freedoms for granted. Thank you dear friend.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Ruby! I was thinking of you when I wrote this....I have to write something you are actually interested in from time to time for a reward for reading all the other stuff. :)

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      Ruby Jean Fuller 3 years ago from Southern Illinois

      Bill, I ' gotta say, " This was such a joy to read. My lineage includes, Indian, German, and Irish. I am so proud to be an american and so glad you write wonderful articles like this. Thank you..

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      Marlene Bertrand 3 years ago from Northern California, USA

      When I factor out the way my people came to this country, I can imagine people waking up every day with the hope that some day, they will be able to come to America to live the life of their dreams. No doubt, it was difficult, but when you want something really bad, the blood, sweat, and tears don't matter. Thank you for reminding me of how hard our ancestors worked so that I can have the freedoms I have today. Think about it - they had to fetch a pail, then walk to and from the well several times to get water. I turn a nozzle and water comes out. When I'm toiling in the garden, it's a hobby. For my ancestors, it was a necessity. Thanks for your reminder of those who came before me - making my life easier.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      DJ, I love old barns as well. This summer I'm going to be shooting a lot of pictures of old barns so stay tuned. :) In the meantime, carry on with that book. I just hit the 100,000 word mark with mine; three more chapters to go.

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      DJ Anderson 3 years ago

      Brilliant my friend, brilliant!!

      I love acknowledging those who worked so hard and had so little compared to that which we have today.

      Your words brought it all to life, and the music by John Fogelberg

      was perfect for this article.

      I have an affinity for old barns. If only they could talk.

      Great work, Bill.

      DJ.

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Efficient, you and me both. Thank you for your second visit today. I am a lucky man. :)

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Dora, I can only hope that one day we will wake up and understand what is truly important in life. Until that day I'll just keep writing about it.

      Thank you my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Will, now wouldn't that be something to see... month off and nobody to take care of the elitists? You know we are in the same corner in this cat fight my friend. America's working class needs to rise up once again and get the credit they deserve. Thank you for an excellent comment.

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      Efficient Admin 3 years ago from Charlotte, NC

      Very thought provoking. It makes me appreciate all of the modern conveniences of our day and to not take people for granted.

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      Dora Isaac Weithers 3 years ago from The Caribbean

      In this time, we cannot think enough about the habits, the values, the sense of responsibility which characterized that time. Thank you for holding it up before us. We might eventually connect.

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      WillStarr 3 years ago from Phoenix, Arizona

      We worship our entertainers and lavish praise on the wealthy, the political class, and the big city elitists, but where would any of them be without all those little people who build their castles, provide their food and drink, build their roads, their cars, and their airplanes, and even pick up their garbage? If a weary working America ever took a month off to rest, the frantic elitists would begin starving within a week.

      All praise to America's working class, the real backbone on the nation.

      Great Hub, Billy!

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I do too, manatita; thank you!

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you rdsparrowrite...it is always nice having you stop by

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      manatita44 3 years ago from london

      Bill, great work. I really admire pioneers!!

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Eddy, I am going to return to those days. They were simpler and there was a great appreciation of life....I have had it with the modern world my friend. Just Bev and I in the country writing and loving life.

      Thank you as always

      billy

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      rdsparrowriter 3 years ago

      Interesting to read the article as well as the comments.

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      Eiddwen 3 years ago from Wales

      Another wonderful read by you Billy .Oh yes how I remember bringing in the crops on my grandmother's farm .I would sit quietly with my book and watch them all working on and on and on!!Lunchtime consisted of sandwiches and plenty to drink. No modern machinery like the ones of today ;oh no to sweat and carry on and on was the way. Thank you so much for more great memories and oh yes how times have changed but a part of me will always be with the hard toil of years gone by. Take care billy and wishing you a wonderful day.

      Love from wales.

      Eddy.

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Mary, I have nothing to add to what you have said, and you said it beautifully. I often think we take our freedoms for granted; a different perspective just might help us to appreciate all that has been given to us. Thank you for some beautiful thoughts.

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      Mary McShane 3 years ago from Fort Lauderdale, Florida

      My parents came here from Ireland and settled in Philadelphia, PA just before the War in 1940 when travel was still possible. 4 of us kids were born in Ireland and 4 of us are first generation Americans. They moved to Tampa FL just before my sister and I were born because already they hated the harsh Northern winters. lol But the sense of history that we were raised with, differed from other kids in our neighborhood who had lived here for 3 or 4 generations. Because of experiences, I think many immigrants see this country differently - with our freedoms and liberties - than say, 3 or 4th generation Americans. Not to denigrate anyone's love for country, but rather to say I notice we seem to be more aware of the freedoms here than our counterparts.

      There was not a week that went by that my parents did not thank God for the opportunity to be able to travel safely to the new World with 4 small children in tow, be able to make a living and to raise a family without the fears he had in Ireland.

      I often wondered what would have happened to the 4 kids born here, if they had been born in Ireland and if our family had remained there. Would we have the life we have now, professionally, financially, and personally? I think not.

      We have only our ancestors to thank for paving the way for us. And my father jokingly never let us forget it whenever a big ticket item was came into our home or when any of us kids had a big accomplishment (college, new house, job, $$$ windfall, etc.). We never forgot, but it made him feel better to drive that point home, we knew he meant it lovingly. They are both gone now and I know they would be very proud of their 8 daughters who have brought two more generations into the world, a world they made possible, even if some days it seems like all is going to hell in a handbasket with the decisions lawmakers are making by doing their best to wipe out the original plan set forth by our first ancestors.

      Everyone should take time to reflect on where they are now, where they came from and play a little of the "what if" game to appreciate it. Good post, Bill.

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Larry, I'm with you all the way here my friend. We have allowed our freedoms to be taken away from us....we have screwed the pooch economically.....I'm not all that certain my dad would recognize this country today and I know he would not be happy with it. Thanks for your opinion; we are thinking the same today.

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      larry Kitzmann 3 years ago

      Guess I take a different view of this from many others. NO I don't think those who went before would at all be proud. Indeed I think they would throw up there hands and say WTF did you do with all that we gave you. Won't go into all the reasons why on that, just my observation from knowing more than a few hard working farmers and laborers out there.

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Of course it wouldn't, Sha...no doubt about that....but

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      Shauna L Bowling 3 years ago from Central Florida

      I know exactly what you're saying Bill. But think about the jobs most people do today compared to back then. My dad grew up to be a stockbroker. Would that have been possible without his father's hard and dangerous work?

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Sha, they did that....a better life? I guess so...sometimes I have my doubts. :) Thank you as always; have a great Thursday. and love to you.

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks Michele; I often wonder if they would be proud. I suppose they would. :)

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      Shauna L Bowling 3 years ago from Central Florida

      May we never forget! My step-father's parents came to America from Poland. Gaji (Grandpa) worked in the coal mines and Bachi (Grandma) scrubbed floors in the Jack Frost sugar plant in Philly. It was a rough life but they did what they had to do to put food on the table and a roof over my dad's and aunts' heads. They paved the way for a better life for generations to come.

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      Michelle Liew 3 years ago from Singapore

      Our forefathers would be proud when they see how our nations have grown; we really wouldn't be anywhere without them.

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you so much, Janine. Stay safe and warm today; sooner or later spring has to arrive, right?

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      Janine Huldie 3 years ago from New York, New York

      Absolutely beautiful Bill and definitely love how you dedicated this to you father and grandfather, too. And thank you for your inspiring words today. We are getting more snow and yet another snow day, so just trying to check in, because I have Kevin and the girls home today. Hope you are having a wonderful Thursday now though.