This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: "https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr"

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)
jump to last post 1-4 of 4 discussions (47 posts)

Should the United Nations control the internet?

  1. cjhunsinger profile image74
    cjhunsingerposted 3 years ago

    In a recent interview, Tim Berners-Lee stated during the Web We Want festival, said, “I want a web where I’m not spied on, where there’s no censorship.” He warned that corporations and the governments want control of the Internet.
    Mr. Lee is one of the Founders of the internet and it was he that came up with the WWW enabling a world wide system.
    The US now controls the internet and it remains free, but there is talk of a UN control and taxing of internet use and, also, as Lee points out a fear of a corporate control or control by a Chinese system of government.
    What would happen should the present philosophy of internet oversight be lost to a governmental or corporate censorship?

    1. John Holden profile image60
      John Holdenposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      If the U controls the Internet how can it be free?
      The US = corporations.

      1. cjhunsinger profile image74
        cjhunsingerposted 3 years agoin reply to this

        Thats the question. The US now has oversight authority and, so far, it remains free, Please try to respond to the question.

        1. John Holden profile image60
          John Holdenposted 3 years agoin reply to this

          I did, maybe not in the way you wanted, but a valid response none the less.

          Again, if the US controls the Internet how can it be free?
          Why is being spied on by the US preferable to being spied on by the UN?

          1. cjhunsinger profile image74
            cjhunsingerposted 3 years agoin reply to this

            John
            I am happy for you. Keep up the good work.

            1. John Holden profile image60
              John Holdenposted 3 years agoin reply to this

              So no answer to why it is preferable to be spied on by the US rather than the UN!

          2. profile image60
            retief2000posted 3 years agoin reply to this

            I suppose that more than just the NSA is "spying." Intelligence agencies are always spying in every way possible. Let's not suppose that British Intelligence isn't doing the same, that is if any is to be found in Britain.

            1. John Holden profile image60
              John Holdenposted 3 years agoin reply to this

              Well American intelligence seems to rely on British intelligence rather a lot so, yes, you'll find that British intelligence spies on us for the Americans.

              1. profile image60
                retief2000posted 3 years agoin reply to this

                And vice versa.

              2. Dr Billy Kidd profile image92
                Dr Billy Kiddposted 3 years agoin reply to this

                The U.S. has Great Britain spy on the United Nation headquarters. Then the information is exchanged. By that, I mean, the U.S. spies on the British Isles and hands the results over to their intelligence agencies. This way, neither the CIA or M16 can be accused of spying on their own soil. Both agencies are not supposed to spy within their own country. In the U.S., it is the National Security Agency that spies on Americans--regardless that their charter apparently doesn't allow for it, except on communication that are going abroad.

                The biggest threats to the U.S. internet arise from companies like Comcast/TimeWarner. They want to charge more for faster webpage access. Yet, they claim it's in the name of net neutrality! If the FCC agrees to this, my own webpage (BillyKidd.com) would have second class availability for users. I don't have thousands of dollars to gain faster access.

                And speaking of faster access, South Korea is working on putting in 1 gigabits downloads for everyone. Meanwhile, Verizon in the U.S. charges $79 a month for something like 50 megabits download--20 times slower!.

                U.N. control of the internet would be controlled by the money and power of the major corporations representing each country. Sounds like chaos.

                1. John Holden profile image60
                  John Holdenposted 3 years agoin reply to this

                  Oh! Are they different corporations to the ones that control the USA then?

      2. cjhunsinger profile image74
        cjhunsingerposted 3 years agoin reply to this

        John
        It cannot be free by any exercise of ones imagination.
        The NSA is not a corporation.

        1. John Holden profile image60
          John Holdenposted 3 years agoin reply to this

          The NSA is a government body. The USA government is controlled by corporations therefore the NSA is controlled by the corporations.

          1. cjhunsinger profile image74
            cjhunsingerposted 3 years agoin reply to this

            I am sure you are right, but simple one line statements or accusations seem to lack a, well, you know foundation or something that has been critically thought out. If it is the best you can do then,  well,  you know I  am  happy for you.

            1. John Holden profile image60
              John Holdenposted 3 years agoin reply to this

              Why do you value verbosity over brevity?

              1. cjhunsinger profile image74
                cjhunsingerposted 3 years agoin reply to this

                Simply to make the point that nothing is accomplished.

  2. handymanbill profile image80
    handymanbillposted 3 years ago

    NO. No one should control free speech.

  3. psycheskinner profile image82
    psycheskinnerposted 3 years ago

    There is no evidence whatsoever that the US has used its indexing authority in any nefarious way.  And being the indexing authority does not really come with any extra ability to spy on things. It just means you give every website its real numerical "address".

    1. John Holden profile image60
      John Holdenposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      It goes a lot deeper than allocating internet addresses.

      Ever heard of Dishfire?

      1. wilderness profile image98
        wildernessposted 3 years agoin reply to this

        Yes - it concerns collecting text messages and possibly other information from cell phones.  I don't know of any connection to the internet - do you?

        1. John Holden profile image60
          John Holdenposted 3 years agoin reply to this

          Tut, sloppy on my part, try muscular instead.

      2. psycheskinner profile image82
        psycheskinnerposted 3 years agoin reply to this

        Yes, what does it have to do with this thread which is about the US being the indexer of the internet?

        1. John Holden profile image60
          John Holdenposted 3 years agoin reply to this

          OK, so why should the USA be the sole indexer of the internet?

          1. wilderness profile image98
            wildernessposted 3 years agoin reply to this

            Do you think a committee of members from each country would do a better job?  Or would you just choose a different country?  China perhaps, so they could give a lift to the content thieves there?

            1. John Holden profile image60
              John Holdenposted 3 years agoin reply to this

              No, I asked the question, answering a question with a question is weak.

              1. wilderness profile image98
                wildernessposted 3 years agoin reply to this

                I apologize; the question was intended to point out that I don't know of any superior option.

                1. John Holden profile image60
                  John Holdenposted 3 years agoin reply to this

                  I thought you were a great supporter of private enterprise? Why does any country control internet indexing?

                  1. wilderness profile image98
                    wildernessposted 3 years agoin reply to this

                    What would the price be?  Meaning I don't really want to pay someone for doing that work, and companies do not work for free.

                  2. psycheskinner profile image82
                    psycheskinnerposted 3 years agoin reply to this

                    Some entity has to control it, and the current entity has an excellent record of conduct so far.

  4. GA Anderson profile image81
    GA Andersonposted 3 years ago

    Has someone discovered a problem with the US's control of the domain indexing protocol?

    Everyone is aware that that is the ONLY dominance the US has in this discussion aren't they?

    The NSA and "spying" stuff is completely unrelated to the topic. Right?

    GA

    1. John Holden profile image60
      John Holdenposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      It would have helped if the OP had stated that the only concern was with domain indexing, instead it was a complaint about the UN controlling the internet which I assumed meant the internet! Silly me.

    2. profile image60
      retief2000posted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Buzz Kill, a nice donnybrook was shaping up.

 
working