Simple Question to Put Perspective on a Complicated Issue...

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  1. megs78 profile image59
    megs78posted 8 years ago

    Why is it that Americans fully agree and comply with the rules and regulations put on them by the auto insurance industry to have insurance for your car if you own one, but balk at having to buy insurance for their own bodies?

    1. profile image0
      Scott.Lifeposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Well I think it has alot to do with the fact that some less privileged people can barely afford gas for their cars let alone insurance but if they don't get it they can't drive, or then work and feed themselves. Many of that same group do not have employers that provide insurance and so go without. Not by choice but by necessity.In many east Tennessee towns employers like to work their employees right up to 39 hours a week so that they won't have to provide insurance, while paying them wages that keep them below poverty level. I would love insurance but as the economy in my area has collapsed and there are no jobs to be heard of, I am lucky that I can even buy food. Now to be told if I don't buy insurance I'll be penalized is even better. Where was my tax rebate and bail out after 15 years of serving my country and manual labor? You know what I was told after being laid off that in the previous five years I made too much money for benefits despite having payed in my entire adult life and never drawn before.So now i am on my own and so are millions of Americans and despite the evening news this number is expected to grow significantly over the next few months, so you tell me, why would Americans be upset about being forced to buy insurance?

      1. megs78 profile image59
        megs78posted 8 years agoin reply to this

        When I said "buy insurance', I didn't necessarily mean it like that.  I meant it the same way that we have insurance.  By paying through taxes into a fund that goes into the health system.  Sure, it makes a paycheck smaller, but hey, then maybe you would qualify for unemployment becuase you didn't make so much.  I'm not trying to make light of your situation, I am living it too.  Me and my husband have 3 small children and my hubby has been laid off 4 times in the last 2 years.  I know its hard, but that is more of a reason to get a better health care system isn't it?

        1. lrohner profile image80
          lrohnerposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          I wouldn't qualify for unemployment in any case because I'm self-employed. Next argument....?

          BTW...Food on the table also contributes to our health. And probably more than health insurance. Unless you are suggesting that I starve to the brink of death so that I can be admitted to hospital free of charge?

          1. profile image0
            A Texanposted 8 years agoin reply to this

            When you get to the hospital order the Fajitas

            1. megs78 profile image59
              megs78posted 8 years agoin reply to this

              Irohner, even if you are self-employed in Canada, you still have health care.  What do you  mean 'next argument?'  I know you don't qualify for unemployment benefits if you are self-employed, the same applies in Canada...I don't completely understand your point.

        2. profile image0
          Ghost32posted 8 years agoin reply to this

          It will definitely not be a better health care system for me.  Period.  I've paid my own way through every major trip to the doc for the past 65 years with one exception in 1970 (when I did have insurance though my employer).  Being fined and/or jailed now is a tax on me with NO positive comeback to me.  I'm skilled in alternative health, know my own body, and I WON'T be using health insurance EVEN IF I AM forced to buy the furshlugginer stuff. 

          In the meantime, it's even worse for my disabled wife.  When we moved back to her old stomping grounds in Arizona last April, we suddenly ran into a ferocious wall: NO doctor was willing to treat her!  Not even the guy who'd been her M.D. 3 years earlier!  So if this goes through, we wind up either having to pay (money goes out) or get fined (money goes out) and still the only one of us who needs medical care gets nothing.  Zip. Nada. 

          Because compulsory health insurance does NOT mean a doctor has to take on a new patient he doesn't want to treat.  So then we'll be paying "evermore" for the neighbor while Pam dies (literally) from medical neglect.

          Am I incensed?  Is the bear Catholic?

      2. earnestshub profile image87
        earnestshubposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        I hope things pick up in your area Scott, hang in there. smile

    2. profile image0
      rednckwmnposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      they dont all comply with auto insurance.  my question is, why cant we skip the middle man, and go to the dr as needed, without insurance?

      1. Misha profile image71
        Mishaposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        That's the only sensible approach, if you ask me. smile

        1. profile image0
          rednckwmnposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          nevermind, you found it lol

    3. profile image0
      A Texanposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      I pay for health insurance because I can! I buy auto insurance because I have to!

    4. qbanmamiof2 profile image52
      qbanmamiof2posted 8 years agoin reply to this

      I am glad that auto insurance is mandatory. Driving is a priveledge not a right. We drive one bombs and toys that can Kill you. when there are accidents it costs thousands to repair or even buy a new car. Insurance saves a lot of people the financial burden. It pays for your hospital bills, pays off your car debt and gives you a min. of 10 grand (here in FLorida) in your pocket.
      There are many people out there that drive without insurance kill people because they can't drive for $hit and no one gets compensated.
      That is why it's different it's your choice to have a car and a license and it is a priveledge but there should no way be a forced Insurance on your person. A person can bump into another but not cause injury. When a person causes thousands of dollars worth of injury and destruction it's because it's intentional

      1. Michael Willis profile image78
        Michael Willisposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        Wow, I need to move to Florida. I was in an auto accident 2 and a half years ago. Still to this day no money for doctors bills, re-imbursements for lost wages. They only fixed my truck. My injury costs were more than 10 times the $$$amount of damage to the vehicle. The "Insurance" industry uses the dollar amount of damage to the "vehicle" as their basis for monetary compensation to the injured party in an accident. And that is by THEIR projected cost, not the real cost.

        Auto insurance is far worse since it became mandatory and more costly. The same will happen to health care if and when it happens.
        And I do have a very good lawyer on the case.

        AND...MY insurance has gone up every 6 months since the accident...even though I was not responsible for the accident.

  2. lrohner profile image80
    lrohnerposted 8 years ago

    Ditto what Scott said. If that law went into place right now, I would bet more than half of us would be in jail very soon.

    The insurance that we are required to carry on our cars is to cover other people that we might hurt in the case of an accident. We are NOT required to carry insurance to cover harm to us or our cars.

    And I might add that the cost of car insurance is much less than health insurance. 25 years ago my (now ex) hubby and I were both self-employed. Our health insurance in one year went from $750 per month to $1,000 per month. Granted, that was health insurance with a maternity rider, but not much more.

    1. Uninvited Writer profile image82
      Uninvited Writerposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      But don't you think your health insurance would certainly go down with national health care?...I doubt you would still have to be paying $1,000 a month.

      1. lrohner profile image80
        lrohnerposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        Maybe initially. And I say maybe. But on top of increasing our national debt, just like everything else here, the cost will go up...and up...and up.  They really need to focus on fixing the economy here as well as the job and housing markets before they put this plan into action or else half of us will find ourselves not only unemployed, but in jail as well.

        1. Misha profile image71
          Mishaposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          free labor, you know lol

          1. profile image0
            Ghost32posted 8 years agoin reply to this

            Well stated, Misha.  But unfortunately not all that much of a joke.

            1. Misha profile image71
              Mishaposted 8 years agoin reply to this

              The only way to cope with it is laugh. I know, I've been there. smile

              1. profile image0
                Ghost32posted 8 years agoin reply to this

                Thanks for the good advice, Misha.  I happen to agree!  Now, if I can only find where I left my sense of humor...oh, that's right!  It was fined for failing to buy Pun Insurance and jailed in Virginia! lol

        2. profile image0
          rednckwmnposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          you do live in new england dontchya? : )

        3. Uninvited Writer profile image82
          Uninvited Writerposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          Anyway, I can't say anything about it anyway. I might feel differently if I did live in the US. I just see how ours works out and don't understand the fear. It's not perfect, but I'm glad it exists. If I didn't have that, plus insurance through work I don't know what I would do.

          1. profile image0
            rednckwmnposted 8 years agoin reply to this

            gotcha, it IS different here dont worry about it

            1. megs78 profile image59
              megs78posted 8 years agoin reply to this

              Probably right, I guess we can't really know, we just know what works and thats all that matters. I sometimes question why it matters to me at all what people in the US do?  Then I remember, 'Oh yeah, I got nothing better to do!' wink

              1. Uninvited Writer profile image82
                Uninvited Writerposted 8 years agoin reply to this

                Yes...it's hard to pass by these arguments though smile

                1. megs78 profile image59
                  megs78posted 8 years agoin reply to this

                  I know, I sometimes have to sit on my fingers...smile

              2. profile image0
                rednckwmnposted 8 years agoin reply to this

                lol   im having such a bad day.....that so made me smile....thank you!!!

                1. megs78 profile image59
                  megs78posted 8 years agoin reply to this

                  anytime rednckwmn, anytime...smile

      2. TheMoneyGuy profile image73
        TheMoneyGuyposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        Not by a long shot, it is a matter of simple mathmetics, all that changes is which side of the equation the money comes from.  As a native american I have dealt with social medicine my whole life.  It sucks, it is miserable, and sadly slightly better than the current system.  The real answer is to outlaw all forms of insurance period, and force doctors and hospitals to accept the market value of their services, while upholding their oath.  When the government is in charge they make bad decision in the name of the national good.  Look at any Fascist or Socialist country in a time of severe crisis.  They all turn their backs on some group, and tell you it is for the greater good.  No thanks.  There are lots of dead indians, thanks to brilliant government decision in the name of civilization.  Don't think I am talking about a hundres years ago either, I am talking last week.

        TMG

        1. profile image0
          Ghost32posted 8 years agoin reply to this

          Exactly.

  3. Misha profile image71
    Mishaposted 8 years ago

    Hi TMG, did not see you for a while. Welcome back bro. smile

    1. TheMoneyGuy profile image73
      TheMoneyGuyposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Every once in a while I get a few minutes to myself, and I like to see what the hubbers are up too.

      TMG

  4. lrohner profile image80
    lrohnerposted 8 years ago

    Megs and UW -- Luv ya both, but I assume that at least one person in your household has a job and is able to pay the bills? That is not the case with a growing number of Americans. It's actually to the point where tent cities are springing up all over the country. I'm sorry, but I'd pass up on healthcare to put food on the table any day of the week. Or maybe we can all just starve almost to death so that we can be hospitalized for free so that the government can tell us how successful the program was.

    Once they fix the economic situation, they can have a very intelligent discussion about mandatory healthcare.

    1. Uninvited Writer profile image82
      Uninvited Writerposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Nope, it's just me...

    2. megs78 profile image59
      megs78posted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Irohner, right back at ya smile  HOwever, you are wrong about the work thing.  My hubby and I are in deep trouble right now and it all stems from the Recession.  I wrote a hub about it actually, its called Effects of the Recession in Canada if you want to read it.

      The fact is, we have been living very close to the poverty line and have only been getting by by cutting HUGE corners.  It has been horrible.  Out of 2 years of work, my husband only worked 11 months and those months have been staggered over the two years.  5 weeks of work, 2 months of unemployment, 2 weeks of work, 4 months of unemployment...do you get my point?  We have 3 kids.  And we had a major health issue with our youngest in the last couple of months.  He took two ambulance rides, was admitted to two different hospitals, has seen specialists and been tested countless times...can you imagine if we had to pay for all that?  Listen, I know firsthand whats happening these days, because I'm living it.  But at least I don;t have to worry that when an emergency arises, that I will have to choose between food and healthcare.

      1. Uninvited Writer profile image82
        Uninvited Writerposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        Excellent hub, I just fanned you smile I like your writing very much.

        1. megs78 profile image59
          megs78posted 8 years agoin reply to this

          Thanks so much UW, that means a lot to me!

  5. lrohner profile image80
    lrohnerposted 8 years ago

    Megs and UW -- Again, I love you both, but you are way off on this one. And when I say way off, I mean way off. I'm not opposed to having a rational discussion about mandatory health care. I am opposed to it until they fix the economy. Quitee frankly, I'm not sure I'd be for it then, but I'd sure be in a better position to have the discussion.

    I am surrounded by empty storefronts, foreclosure signs and friends that can't find work and support themselves. The winter season is almost here, and most of us are now faced with home heating bills that we may not be able to pay.

    When Connecticut first implemented a State tax 20 years ago, it hit folks very hard. Businesses moved right and left out of the state, and people moved too. We eventually acclimated to it -- keyword being acclimated.

    This is not the time to hit Americans with another bill to pay. Maybe in a few years, not now.

    Megs -- What would happen if you had another bill you had to pay right now that you couldn't afford? Would you be happy about going to jail for not being able to afford it?

    1. megs78 profile image59
      megs78posted 8 years agoin reply to this

      I have a lot of bills that I can't afford right now.  Seriously.  I never suggested that being forced to pay for health insurance outright was the way to go. 

      I understand that this is not the time to discuss extra bills or taxes for most people, I get that.  Hopefully in the future, things we will be easier for you.  I think I will gracefully bow out now...g'nite!

  6. profile image0
    ralwusposted 8 years ago

    You know, I'm glad you asked that question. I do not have an answer but I read in the newspapers they are going to have 30 minutes of political stuff on Fox every Monday from 7:30 to 8. to educate America. LOL They couldn't educate America if they started at 6:30.

    1. megs78 profile image59
      megs78posted 8 years agoin reply to this

      smile  I don't think I'd look to Fox for any sort of education, but thats just me...wink

  7. steffsings profile image73
    steffsingsposted 8 years ago

    Rules/Reg's (Insurance) that governs my personal belongings is a nuisance to say the least, but understandable.

    Rules/Reg's (Insurance) that will force me to care for my own body is theoretically good but frightening...

    Yes - it's good for us & will benefit the country in the long run, but whats the next step? Required/Gov sanctioned & forced BC screens for gals over 40 & colonoscopies for gents over 50? [or suffer a hefty fine for the medical dodgers?]

  8. spartanking1978 profile image56
    spartanking1978posted 8 years ago

    It is a definite fallacy that we do not have an excellent healthcare system...but what lead to that err? Perhaps we should re-examine our patient in favor of it's new matrix...

 
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