jump to last post 1-5 of 5 discussions (10 posts)

Will independents actually decide which candidates win Election 2012?

  1. Perspycacious profile image82
    Perspycaciousposted 5 years ago

    Will independents actually decide which candidates win Election 2012?

  2. profile image0
    JThomp42posted 5 years ago

    NO. I think too many people have already made up their minds, and then of course you have the old school people who vote totally democrat or totally republican. Although it would make it interesting if there were enough independents to make a difference. What it all boils down to it, the electoral college is going to be the deciding factor as usual anyway. And they do not always go with the popular vote.

    1. Perspycacious profile image82
      Perspycaciousposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Right you are!  The electors are pledged on only the first ballot to vote for the majority vote from their own individual state ("winner takes all" in effect disenfranchising the minoirty therein so that millions end up with no say from their state.)

  3. profile image0
    huckelburyposted 5 years ago

    The electorate is evenly split now at around 47% for each party. That leaves 6% for both sides to target, and that will determine who wins. Romney has attempted to move to the center on some issues to attract those undecided independents, but he's all over the road on abortion and immigration reform, for example, depending on his audience. He was correct, however, on that Mother Jones tape:  he'll never get that 47% he mentioned, just as Obama will never touch the other 47%. This is going to get even nastier the closer we get to the election, even at the risks of alienating the 6% in the middle.

    1. Perspycacious profile image82
      Perspycaciousposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      It could well be 47%/47% nationwide,  but the key question is "What is it in the swing states where the election of electors will decide the contest?"

  4. KT Banks profile image60
    KT Banksposted 5 years ago

    As a card carrying Independent, I would like to say at this point I'm all for ________. But I'm just not. I still wish we had a third choice. My vote is going to be for one man, not because I want him to win...but because I really don't want the other guy to win. I may be the least excited person in line to vote. But, Yes. I do already have my mind made up.

    1. Perspycacious profile image82
      Perspycaciousposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      The "better" of two poor choices is still the "better" choice.  Now that both have crippled the leadership of the other going forward, what are we really left with?

  5. Amy Becherer profile image74
    Amy Bechererposted 5 years ago

    If in fact every vote counts, despite the confusing rhetoric that tries to classify the political leanings of any individual (other than diehard Dem or Republicans), it is still a toss-up.  The world won't know until the fat lady sings, being the last vote is cast.  The fact of the matter, I believe, is that those that don't vote also factor into the outcome.  Throughout the many months of speculation and relentless, everchanging polls with margins for error, it is all speculation at this point.  Many independent American voters will make their final decision at the 11th hour in the polling booth.

    1. Perspycacious profile image82
      Perspycaciousposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      That is the one place where religion and politics can meet.  If it is a toss up, let the spirit guide.

    2. Amy Becherer profile image74
      Amy Bechererposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Exactly, Perspycacious.  For those that are confused by the political rhetoric, the bickering, the accusations of both parties against the other, in the end, undecided voters will go with their hearts.

 
working