jump to last post 1-9 of 9 discussions (21 posts)

Why do school shooting mainly happen in the U.S.?

  1. nightwork4 profile image61
    nightwork4posted 5 years ago

    Why do school shooting mainly happen in the U.S.?

    there is the odd time where other countries experience it, but what makes it so common in the U.S. what is different there then other civilized countries?

  2. FatFreddysCat profile image99
    FatFreddysCatposted 5 years ago

    Cuz we've got too damn many wack-a-doodles and too damn many guns.

    1. brblog profile image85
      brblogposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Agree!!

  3. peeples profile image96
    peeplesposted 5 years ago

    I think it is a mixture of a few things. Mental Health help is not easy to get for many. On top of that guns are too easy for people to get. So long as you have never been in a state mental hospital or convicted of a felony you are free to own a gun. Plus we live in a country that forces you to fit into certain "molds" or you are looked down on. People may consider this one of the best nations ever but we have a lot of crap going on here. Child abuse, criminal domestic violence, divorce, and alcoholism are all common.
    The solution? Have more requirements to own a gun, execute anyone found guilty of abusing their child, offer free mental health options, encourage two parent households, make it possible for more mothers to stay home and raise their children, and remove any child from a home where domestic violence is happening.

    1. profile image0
      CJ Sledgehammerposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Execute those guilty of child abuse? I was thinking about possibly amputating both their arms and legs, but killing them - now that's cold. :0)

    2. peeples profile image96
      peeplesposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I'm sure the victims would agree once old enough to understand.

  4. profile image0
    JThomp42posted 5 years ago

    Because so many do not have health care. Let along paying a psychiatrist over 100 dollars an hour to help them. Or the parents are too humiliated to think their child would possibly need help. EGO! WHAT HAVE I DONE TO MAKE MY CHILD THIS WAY? They must realize that mental conditions are normally chemical imbalances in one's brain requiring medication. Parents are around their children mor than anyone and can tell if they need help or not.

    1. profile image0
      CJ Sledgehammerposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Parents are around their children more than anyone? Perhaps physically, but not mentally, emotionally or spiritually. Truth is, the average father only spends 5 minutes A DAY with his children in meaningful dialog, while mothers spend slightly more.

    2. Express10 profile image88
      Express10posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I think that it is the parent's/family responsibility first and foremost to get help for their child or relative who is exhibiting odd or dangerous behaviors or report it. Also, some can't afford mental health care and a sizeable number refuse it.

    3. peeples profile image96
      peeplesposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      CJ what you said makes me even more pro on staying at home with my children. Who in their right mind only spends 5 minutes a day with their own child?!?

  5. profile image0
    Old Empresarioposted 5 years ago

    The obvious reason is because most governments don't allow citizens to own the types of weapons our citizens are allowed to own. But the other reason is deeper. It has to do with our Judeo-Christian value system that has pervaded our laws and our philosophy on life. Young men who feel sexually repressed tend to become violent--not sexually violent, but just violent in general. Most of us have emotional inhibitors that keep us from committing acts of violence, though some psychologically disturbed people do not. These people who want to be "good" and who are often described by friends and neighbors as "good", will not buy drugs or prostitutes as a release since these are illegal and considered shameful by Christian standards. Instead, they turn toward guns and thoughts of violence.

    1. profile image0
      CJ Sledgehammerposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Really?

    2. profile image0
      Old Empresarioposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Well...I know what you believe

  6. violetheaven profile image59
    violetheavenposted 5 years ago

    There has been a dirrect link between violence in media and violence in culture.  The reason some educated individuals believe the violence is so great in america stems from the level of acceptance access and openness of this kind of violence in the media.  Along with the gap of mental healthcare access.

    1. connorj profile image75
      connorjposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      We are not significantly violent, relative to other countries. If you wish to see violence visit the Middle East, Pakistan etc. Freedom of women is significantly limited and there is tangible fear in women and others. Most of these areas are far from

  7. grumpiornot profile image71
    grumpiornotposted 5 years ago

    Are there statistically more school age shootings in the States than elsewhere or is it just more widely reported in the media? I don't live in the States and carry no mandate to defend it, but I do live in South Africa and we live with extreme violence too. It appears that we have more school age rapes than elsewhere in the world.

    This comment is not meant to detract in any way from the violence or horror in either country, but it often seems that the school shootings in the States are amplified into singularities that they might not be...

    Sorry people, but I question the motives of questions that are not backed up with any statistical support.

    1. grumpiornot profile image71
      grumpiornotposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      And for the record, this shooting was horrific and would be in any country. Condolences to the family and friends; hopefully the mental health and medical system can develop and learn from this sad experience.

    2. profile image0
      JThomp42posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I absolutely agree.

  8. connorj profile image75
    connorjposted 5 years ago

    https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/7484695_f260.jpg

    Actually they do not; statistically speaking there are more violent countries than the United States. Now having said that we still have a significant problem and it is indeed something we must thoroughly investigate and develop some quantitative solutions.
    However, there are many variables that do indeed contribute to our issue. One cannot deny that lax gun laws contribute; however, there are many other variables that also contribute. I hypothesize that the most significant variable lies within our poor mental healthcare system and although lax gun laws contribute they are indeed much less significant than our lax mental healthcare issues...

    1. profile image0
      CJ Sledgehammerposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I agree with you. Our problem is NOT access to guns...it is, however, the "loose cannons" that are walking our streets.

  9. Express10 profile image88
    Express10posted 5 years ago

    There are a variety of factors in play in each unique case. Unresolved anger issues, retaliation for bullying or relational aggression, and mental illness are common factors. In cases where the shooter kills themselves, that in itself tells me that they sure had their mental faculties in some order because they want to ensure they don't feel the shame, guilt, or wrath that is due them. Ultimately, the reasons can only be given by the shooter but none will ever make sense to the families and friends of those lost. Further, the U.S. is not as civilized as many would like to believe or lead others into believing.

 
working