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4th Amendment

  1. profile image54
    retired2posted 7 years ago

    Just starting in the Security filed could anyone tell me, I have been told that the 4th Amendment has alot to do with a Security Officer and his job. I know the 4th Amendment and have read it but how does it pertain to security guards. Thanks Retired2

  2. ediggity profile image59
    ediggityposted 7 years ago

    I don't see how the fourth amendment has anything to do with being a security guard.  The fourth amendment deals with unreasonable search and seizure. That applies more towards Law Enforcement Officers not Security Guards.

    1. Mitch Rapp profile image59
      Mitch Rappposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      I guess it would depend on your security assignment. If you are stationed on a construction site out in the middle of nowhere then it probably wouldn't be anything you would deal with, if you are in a mall then you need to know what you can search and what you cannot and for what reasons.

    2. RKHenry profile image77
      RKHenryposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      It applies to anyone of authority. 

      Homeland security is the only one that might be questionable, and since it has not been challenged yet, they're currently not accountable to this law.

    3. livewithrichard profile image85
      livewithrichardposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Found this: 

      "Private security personnel currently outnumber police officers in the United States by three to one. As a result, whether you're shopping in a supermarket or a pharmacy, working in an office building, or visiting a friend in a housing project, you may be more likely to be confronted by a security guard than by a police officer. At the present time, the Fourth Amendment does not apply to searches carried out by non-governmental employees like private security guards.

      For example, assume that a shopping mall security guard acting on a pure hunch searches a teenager's backpack. Inside the backpack the guard finds a baggie containing an illegal drug. The guard can detain the teenager, call the police, and turn the drug over to a police officer. The drug is admissible in evidence, because the search was conducted by a private security guard. As private security guards increasingly exercise traditional police functions, courts may one day apply Fourth Amendment guidelines to their conduct."

      1. Jeffrey Neal profile image80
        Jeffrey Nealposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Well, now THAT'S something to think about! yikes neutral

        Where did you find that, Richard?

        1. livewithrichard profile image85
          livewithrichardposted 7 years ago in reply to this
          1. Jeffrey Neal profile image80
            Jeffrey Nealposted 7 years ago in reply to this

            Thanks!

          2. Michael Willis profile image78
            Michael Willisposted 7 years ago in reply to this

            BUT...if that security guard makes a mistake...he can be sued! He is not covered by  government rules such as police officers. The security officer (or cop-wanna-be) as some are.....better know what he/she is doing. I worked as a security officer wayyyyyyy back in the early 80's. I have seen security guys who think they are cops and get the ego with it. They do not have the protection like policemen do.

 
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