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What conditions would indicate that a state is too large, and should be divided?

  1. bradmasterOCcal profile image29
    bradmasterOCcalposted 2 years ago

    What conditions would indicate that a state is too large, and should be divided?

    California for example is the third largest state in area, and the most populous state in the US.
    If California was a country it would be around number 35 in the world based on population.
    2014 from the World Bank show that Brazil claimed 7th place with a GDP of $2.346 trillion. California's gross state product, which is comparable to GDP, was $2.312 trillion,
    The U.S. came out on top of the list with $17.4 trillion, followed by China with $10.4 trillion.

    California isn't the only state that would make it on the list. Texas and New York would rank as the 13th and 16th largest world economies

    https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/12738532_f260.jpg

  2. lisavollrath profile image96
    lisavollrathposted 2 years ago

    Only when the people of that state decide they should divide, and vote on it. At this point, I doubt that any state would do that.

  3. Old-Empresario profile image82
    Old-Empresarioposted 2 years ago

    Currently there is no law against a state become too populated to be included in the union. In the case of California I think we'll find that climate change and declining resources will make the state unsupportable in its current population levels in the coming decades. I would expect to see Californians moving further west into East Asia where the economies are growing or moving south into Mexico where there is potential for growing markets. I don't see them moving back east into the Midwest.

    1. bradmasterOCcal profile image29
      bradmasterOCcalposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Interesting, but i don't think that will happen. But my question is not legality, but when should the US see that a state is too big to function properly. Although, the US itself isn't functioning properly, so then we have to wait until they fail.

  4. dashingscorpio profile image88
    dashingscorpioposted 2 years ago

    https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/12738981_f260.jpg

    Having lived in Southern California for over 27 years at one time I love the state and I don't think the nation would benefit by going from 50 states to 51 states. Nor would I want to split up Texas.
    People are drawn to the California for it's climate and lifestyle.
    California also has mountains, the ocean, deserts, wineries, large cities, small towns, high tech and innovative companies, aerospace and defense companies, along with film/entertainment industry.
    I imagine the only advantage to breaking up large states is to change the electoral college vote makeup. As of now it takes 270 electoral college votes to elect a president. Any candidate who wins California would get 55 which is almost one fifth of votes needed.
    George H.W. Bush was the last Republican candidate to win California in 1988. Generally speaking when there have been discussions around splitting up California it has been for political reasons and not it's economic GDP or population.

    1. bradmasterOCcal profile image29
      bradmasterOCcalposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      I have lived in both northern and southern Ca, and there is a marked difference in how they both live, and there ideology is way different. The Eastern part of CA is totally different than S Ca.
      The democrats controlled since the 60s

    2. dashingscorpio profile image88
      dashingscorpioposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      However during the 80s 90s, and a good part of the 2000s California had Republican Governors (George Deukmejian, Pete Wilson,  Arnold Schwarzenegger). Gray Davis was the only Democrat governor for 4 years in that period.

    3. bradmasterOCcal profile image29
      bradmasterOCcalposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Really, Arnold was a democrat in rep clothing. Now we are back to Berkley, Jerry Brown for his second turn. The state legislature has been dem dominated since the 60s. Exception, Reagan.

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