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What are the three most important points which you consider to do your vote in e

  1. icv profile image69
    icvposted 22 months ago

    What are the three most important points which you consider to do your vote in elections?

  2. lions44 profile image99
    lions44posted 22 months ago

    Note: I vote Republican across the board. So whomever goes up against Hillary Clinton will get my vote, despite not liking Trump or Cruz.  The answers below relate to my Presidential  primary vote. However, they follow closely what I use for local and state election as well.

    I look for the following traits:

    1. Experience -  Has the person been a governor, or elected to another office of significance?  Having a blend of state and federal experience is a major plus. Being a governor of a populous state for at least 2 terms shows that he/she can get elected. I'm thinking of states like Ohio, Florida, Pennsylvania, Michigan and Texas.  Some of the decisions and events that occur in those state ca mirror those at the federal level, such as emergencies and budget issues.

    2.  Pragmatism -  Someone driven exclusively by ideology will not be successful, for the most part. I would say that President Obama has largely been able to get his way ideologically, due to a compliant press corps.  But overall, it is unusual. Events usually drive the Presidency.  So looking for the best way to get something done, or at least the ability to negotiate, is vital.

    3.  Electability - I want to win.  Even if I don't agree with the candidate on everything, if they are more electable in the general election, he/she gets my primary vote.

    1. icv profile image69
      icvposted 22 months agoin reply to this

      Thanks for sharing your points

  3. Old-Empresario profile image82
    Old-Empresarioposted 22 months ago

    1. What is the candidate's position on global climate change?
    2. What is the candidate's position on police reform?
    3. What is the candidate's position on military invention and defense spending?

    1. icv profile image69
      icvposted 22 months agoin reply to this

      Thabks for sharing your advanced idea

  4. DreamerMeg profile image90
    DreamerMegposted 22 months ago

    We have a different system in the UK and looking at the US, I am very glad of that. In this country, we elect our MPs (Members of Parliament) and the party with most MPs forms the Government. The party votes for its leader, who becomes Prime Minister. That means you do not have the situation where Parliament and Prime Minister have opposite points of view and cannot get anything done! When considering who to vote for, I look at their overall policy, their history over the last few years and very seldom at their future promises: politicians have a poor record on that.

    1. icv profile image69
      icvposted 22 months agoin reply to this

      Thanks for sharing your view. We Indian doing almost similar system of UK. But here the functioning is not as much good in UK.

  5. Matt Easterbrook5 profile image79
    Matt Easterbrook5posted 22 months ago

    You have to look for what politician properly addresses the issues. One also should make sure that the politician can be honest and sincere in voting for what it's constituents stand for and being their voice. Thirdly, you have to make sure they possess the intelligence to hold that public office and have the proper resume with experience and knowledge to effectively perform their job as that elected official.

    1. icv profile image69
      icvposted 22 months agoin reply to this

      Thanks for sharing your view. I loved your third point. We must look at the efficiency and capacity of a candidate.

  6. Nathanville profile image96
    Nathanvilleposted 22 months ago

    Being a Socialist my prime consideration is to vote Socialist, usually Labour in local and national elections as they have a strong support in Bristol; although I will also consider other Socialist Political Parties such as ‘The Green Party’ (who are politically left of the Labour Party). 

    Tactically voting would be a second consideration e.g. to vote for the Socialist Party, or even the Democrats (politically central in the UK) with the strongest support if it meant stopping a Capitalist candidate (Conservative) from winning the seat; which potentially is most likely to occur in European elections.

    My third consideration would be a ‘protest vote’ e.g. voting for the Green Party, any other Socialist Party or even the Liberal Democrats in a local election if I felt that Labour had betrayed their Socialist values; which fortunately isn’t too often.

    The only difference is the Bristol Mayoral elections where I’m also open to support Independent candidates subject to their election policies e.g. the current Bristol Mayor (who I supported) is an Independent, and along with the elected Greens and Labour councillors (who currently share power in a coalition in the Bristol local government) were instrumental in Bristol becoming the ‘Green Capital of Europe’ for 2015; an ‘Award’ which was a great honour to win, plus the extra investment it attracted to Bristol to further pursue its green policies to create further wealth and employment, while at the same time benefitting the environment.

    1. icv profile image69
      icvposted 22 months agoin reply to this

      Thanks for sharing your points here. I must say that, you are a curious voter

    2. Nathanville profile image96
      Nathanvilleposted 21 months agoin reply to this

      Having a multiparty system, it’s probably typical of most British voters.  N.B.  London just elected the first Muslim Mayor anywhere in the western world; with a decisive 56.8% majority on a large turnout.

 
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