How do you determine whether a person is a threat

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  1. dianetrotter profile image68
    dianetrotterposted 17 months ago

    There are quite a few stories in the news about police being called on others for interesting reasons.
    1.  Yale student called police on a student who was sleeping in the common area.
    2.  Same Yale student called police on another student several months ago because another student was asking for directions in a secured Yale building.
    3.  Neighbhor called police on group leaving Rialto Airbnb because they wouldn't wave at her as they left.
    4.  Starbucks employee called police because 2 people were seated and did not order anything.


    There are times when people pose a legitimate threat.  What criteria are important to keep one safe?

    1. promisem profile image97
      promisemposted 17 months agoin reply to this

      I wonder how many of those calls to police are simply people mad at the people they are calling about.

      I get your underlying point about racism, and I don't mean to dispute it. But I also read those articles and end up with questions that the articles don't answer.

      1. dianetrotter profile image68
        dianetrotterposted 17 months agoin reply to this

        I deliberately avoided racism because I didn't want the thread to turn into a discussion about racism. But you are correct in that I have been following tweets, news stories and FB posts on police calls.

        1. promisem profile image97
          promisemposted 17 months agoin reply to this

          I just think about the time a hostile neighbor called the police on us because our daughter parked her car in the street. The neighbor claimed it was an "abandoned vehicle". She did it after I politely asked her to stop expanding her plant beds several feet into our narrow yard.

          Again, I'm not disputing racial motivations. But there may be times when other causes are at work.

          1. dianetrotter profile image68
            dianetrotterposted 17 months agoin reply to this

            This is true.  Many people file protective orders against other people, wasting the courts time.

            Did he police come?  Was the car towed?  How did it turn out?  I would think police run the plates and see that you/your daughter owns the car.  That takes time.  Should your neighbor get a ticket for wasting the police's time?

            How should this have been handled?

            1. Credence2 profile image81
              Credence2posted 17 months agoin reply to this

              People who make the kinds of calls you talk about in your opening comment should be subject to fine if the call has no real basis outside of personal or racist vendettas.

              I am allfor body cams and dashboard cams to monitor interaction between police and civilians. Everyone in an official capacity should be subject to oversight and surveillance. The fact that they are aware of this is an added incentive to behave appropriately at all times.

              Otherwise things can and will get touchy and you can bet that I am of the litigious sort that will hold errant people responsible in the case as malice of forethought as the reasons for making these "calls".

              1. dianetrotter profile image68
                dianetrotterposted 17 months agoin reply to this

                I agree with you Cred!

                How does a person know when to call the police on someone else?

                1. PrettyPanther profile image86
                  PrettyPantherposted 17 months agoin reply to this

                  Diane, it seems some people are more prone to feeling unsafe than others. Some are naturally "nervous nellies" to steal a phrase someone already used here.

                  Here in our small town, we have a Facebook neighborhood watch group. I am often astounded by what some people will report on this page and how often people will say "Call the police!" For example, one woman recently posted, "There is a man in a hoodie walking down Oak Street. I've never seen him before. Be careful!" One of the replies was "Call the police! Better safe than sorry. " Huh? A man you don't know is walking on your street and that warrants a call to the police?  This is a free country, isn't it?

                  Another one: "There is a homeless man picking up empty cans in the park." Someone recommended calling the police. Why?

                  I find these types of people highly  disturbing and I often wonder how our police handle these calls. I hope they discourage them.

                  1. dianetrotter profile image68
                    dianetrotterposted 17 months agoin reply to this

                    Thank you Pretty!  Those are two examples of the type of situation s I'm talking about.  One day I walked into Ross Dress 4 Less.  I was in shoe department about 5 minutes before an employee came to ask if she could help me.  This is unheard of in Ross.  I thought of how I was dressed:. Large hat covering my face and floor length caftan. Admittedly I looked torn up.  At least she didn't call the police.

                  2. GA Anderson profile image92
                    GA Andersonposted 17 months agoin reply to this

                    Yep, yessiree, betchabootie ... you nailed it right from the start PrettyPanther: "... Facebook neighborhood watch group ..."

                    I think each of the examples you listed were just redundant expressions of that facebook quote. (not criticizing that you listed them, just agreeing with you that the quote says it all - by my way of thinking).

                    And I bet our buddy Wilderness would chime in if I mention that I think your examples are also a sign of our loss of a sense of personal responsibility.  Everybody is a (potential) victim, quick call the cops - it's their job!

                    GA

                2. Credence2 profile image81
                  Credence2posted 17 months agoin reply to this

                  I don't know, Diane, maybe my initial response was a bit rash.

                  There is a place for the Mrs Kravitz, nosy neighbor type in every neighborhood. We are grateful that they are there.

                  But, I don't like the idea that my very existence and activities under conditions commonly taken by others warrant a call to the police.

                  Most of OUR folks are hypersensitive to this type of thing as it has too often to led to abuse by fellow citizens and law enforcement. I will admit that.

                  I find the fact that one is innocent until proven guilty a splendid concept in American law, now if people would apply this in their personal relationships with others as a common courtesy, I would not need to present draconian remedies.

                  The Starbucks thing is a case in point. If the CEO says that the incident in Philadelphia in an example of a systemic problem, that is good enough for me. Who can claim to know more about his company than the man in charge?

                  As I alluded to earlier, this is an instance where sitting down and not buying something was acceptable behavior by anyone else in the establishment, why did it rise to the level of police involvement here? Obviously, the CEO of Starbucks did not like the answers or explanations given.

                  1. dianetrotter profile image68
                    dianetrotterposted 17 months agoin reply to this

                    I haven't heard anything different from what is reported by mainstream media and acknowledged by Starbucks management.  I'm trying to figure outo where I'm supposed to get the facts.

                    Trayvon Martin was demonized.  Even after we found out what a slime ball George Zimmerman was, he excuse was he was traumatized.

                    I've purposely not mentioned race because I want to understand other people's thinking.  I think Promise (or Wilderness) mentioned people talking to each more.  Starbuck's employee should have asked if they were waiting for someone if he/she were really concerned.  George Zimmerman, a man with a gun, could have asked Trayvon Martin if he was visiting the complex.  The Yale student could have awakened the girl and said, "You are going to get in trouble.  You can't sleep here."  Same Yale student, several months ago, called the police on the sleeper's friend who was in the building looking for her.  He was lost and asked Yale student for directions.

                    Again, what criteria do people use to determine that someone is a threat?

    2. wilderness profile image94
      wildernessposted 17 months agoin reply to this

      There are doubtless some "nervious nellies" out there that call on insufficient cause.  At the same time WE need to be careful in accepting a "reason" from one that didn't make the call: the incident at Starbucks was not because they didn't buy anything.  It was because they refused to leave and I highly doubt that the call said anything at all about not buying.  This kind of thing is all too common; he was shot for trying to sell a single cigarette when the truth was he was shot for resisting arrest.

      1. IslandBites profile image86
        IslandBitesposted 17 months agoin reply to this

        "I have two gentlemen in my cafe that are refusing to make a purchase or leave."
        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ILKUecw-_vw

        1. dianetrotter profile image68
          dianetrotterposted 17 months agoin reply to this

          And the culture at Starbucks is a social meeting place.  They have wifi and encourage people to come in to meet others.  Last year, I met someone there for a presentation on prepaid legal.  Neither of us purchased anything.  She brought a container of strawberries.  She showed me a sales presentation on prepaid legal.  No one asked us anything.  We left.  No problem!

      2. dianetrotter profile image68
        dianetrotterposted 17 months agoin reply to this

        Interesting Wilderness!  Perception plays a very important role in this.

        Starbucks - I read and heard that one of them asked to use the restroom key.  The person working there would not let them use the key because they were not buying anything.  What would be the purpose for asking them to leave?

        Eric, cigarette seller - I purposely did not include this one because perception is influenced by our experiences.  I feel he was wrong for selling cigarettes.  Resisting - I don't know.  I'd like to stay away from this one.  This is not a ciizen feeling "unsafe" by someone else's presence.

        1. wilderness profile image94
          wildernessposted 17 months agoin reply to this

          Didn't mean the cigarette thing meant someone felt unsafe.  But the claim was that he was shot for selling cigarettes and that had nothing to do with why the trigger was pulled.  In other words, do not accept the word of the arrested person, or even a bystander with an iron in the fire, as to why the arrest was made.

          Like the sleeping Yale student.  Every media report I read (at least a half dozen) made sure to say it was a white student calling the cops on a black student.  Obvious inference was that it was a racial thing and yet not a thing said ever mentioned race.  She was not questioned because of race or because anyone was "afraid" - she was questioned because she was violating the rules in a manner that suggested homlessness.

          1. dianetrotter profile image68
            dianetrotterposted 17 months agoin reply to this

            The cigarette thing doesn't fit into this conversation.  My question is with regard to one person calling the police on another because they feel unsafe.  What makes them feel unsafe?

            If we get into Eric Garner and others that don't fit within this category, we will devolve into racial biases.

            Most of us have not met each other in person.  Would we be intimidated by each other if we were to see each other on the street?  Should the police believe a caller, arrest someone based on that person's word and let the judge figure it out?

          2. dianetrotter profile image68
            dianetrotterposted 17 months agoin reply to this

            BTW they were in a secured building that requires you slide your id to enter the building.  Would it have been better to say, "Hi!  My name is Jane!  I'm majoring in rocket science.  I haven't seen you around here before.  Welcome!  What is your major?"

            1. wilderness profile image94
              wildernessposted 17 months agoin reply to this

              Dianne, that tale is what I'm talking about.  I'll try just one more time and drop it.

              There is no indication that the Yale student called security because she perceived a threat, at least that I've seen.  She called the cops because a stranger was using the room as a bedroom, which is against the rules there.  Perhaps she thought they were homeless, perhaps she's just a stickler for rules, but nothing I've seen indicated she was afraid of anything.

              But the perception being given is that she called because she was afraid of a sleeping black girl, or maybe just any black girl.  That does not seem true at all: someone other than the one calling is giving that impression.  Someone other than the cop that pulled the trigger is saying why the cigarette man was shot.  Someone other than the Starbucks manager is saying why they were arrested.

              All I'm saying is that the reports we get from media, both mainstream and social, make calls that they should not be making and that it is up to us to discern why police are called.  It isn't always because someone is afraid.

              1. dianetrotter profile image68
                dianetrotterposted 17 months agoin reply to this

                If the student was asleep, the house manager should have been called if anything  Where did you hear that it was against the rules to sleep in the common area?  I just Googled and saw nothing about that on any thing I saw.

                The police should not be involved in breaking rules on campus unless it is a crime.  I would have loved to call the police many times on students that were out of control at my school

                If you notice, I haven't mentioned color because I would like to see that excluded if there is another plausible explanation.

                There is protocol to follow.  Report it to the house manager..

                1. wilderness profile image94
                  wildernessposted 17 months agoin reply to this

                  As I understand it the cops were never involved.  Just campus security.  But wasn't it a library or some such?  A study room, maybe?  Is there a "house manager" even there?

                  I only mention color because that is what is being insinuated by media: again, what we're hearing is different than fact, which is the entire point.

                  1. dianetrotter profile image68
                    dianetrotterposted 17 months agoin reply to this

                    W:  As I understand it the cops were never involved.  Just campus security.

                    Response - headline from one writer

                    A black Yale graduate student took a nap in her dorm's common room. So a white student called police   (writer Brandon Griggs)

                    another
                    A black Yale student fell asleep in her dorm’s common room. A white student called police. (writer Cleve R. Wootson)

                    another writer
                    Yale student who called police on black student napping in common room has history of calling cops
                    Many writers covered it but all said she called the police (Writer Pauline Dedaj - Fox News)

                    Exchange between her and the police (not security)

                    “I deserve to be here. I pay tuition like everybody else,” an annoyed Siyonbola told responding officers after they repeatedly asked her to hand over identification. “I’m not going to justify my existence here.”

                    It was part of a tense, racially tinged exchange that the African Studies student had this week with four police officers and the graduate student who called 911 after she found Siyonbola napping in the Hall of Graduate Studies’ 12th-floor common room.

                    Wilderness:  But wasn't it a library or some such?  A study room, maybe?  Is there a "house manager" even there?

                    Yales response: 
                    The officers who responded to Monday’s call interviewed Braasch as well and informed her that Siyonbola had every right to be in the common room, Yale Vice President for Student Life Kimberly Goff-Crews said on Thursday.

                    Lynn Cooley, the dean of Yale's graduate school of arts and sciences, sent an email to graduate students Tuesday telling them that Siyonbola had every right to be in the building.


                    My comment:  Common areas are just that - space that everyone in the building is able to use as:   study room, break room, game room, use microwave/kitchen facilities, sleep if you want to.

                    Fox News article - highlly recommended!
                    http://www.foxnews.com/us/2018/05/10/ya … -cops.html 


                    Wilderness:  I only mention color because that is what is being insinuated by media: again, what we're hearing is different than fact, which is the entire point.

                    Me:  Whatever the fact is, I haven't seen it.  The Fox News writer didn't report it.  Where will we find the fact?

              2. dianetrotter profile image68
                dianetrotterposted 17 months agoin reply to this

                There were reports from many sources about why the guys were arrested in Starbucks.  They were all consistent.  Starbucks has not refuted anything that was reported.  If you heard that they were arrested because they were asked to leave, why were they asked to leave.  They were waiting for a colleague.

                I won't mention Eric Garner because as I said, this is not about people that have a criminal history.  In the Yale case, they don't let just anybody in Yale.  Yale is in the top 10 schools in the country and they select the best and the brightest.  When students on that campus look at each other, they are looking at the best and the brightest.

                Starbucks - No one has said they were disturbing the peace.  They had no weapons on them.  Nothing was reported about criminal history.

                When these situations are conflated with non-similar incidents, it clouds the issue and provides blank false justification.

                1. wilderness profile image94
                  wildernessposted 17 months agoin reply to this

                  I'm sorry, but a cop does not arrest you if you are asked to leave.  Starbucks, a bar, a restaurant, whatever; being asked to leave is not even an offense.

                  But refusing to do so, and doing that multiple times to police, IS an offense.  And is why they were arrested.  Once more, the perception is not the reality, and is the entire point I'm trying to make.

              3. IslandBites profile image86
                IslandBitesposted 17 months agoin reply to this

                Yale police officers told the caller at the time of this week's incident that Siyonbola "had every right to be there," that the episode "was not a police matter" and that they would report what happened to the graduate school dean, Yale Police Chief Ronnell Higgins said in a statement.

                1. dianetrotter profile image68
                  dianetrotterposted 17 months agoin reply to this

                  Thanks Island!  I read that but forgot about it.  And nothing was said about against the school's policy to nap in the common area.  Usually, when studying, you do break the activity into smaller sections to retain what you have learned.  It could be an eating break, bathroom break, telephone call, take naps, etc.

                  It would be interesting to know what the Dean told her since this was the 2nd time this year that the student called the police on someone.

                  1. wilderness profile image94
                    wildernessposted 17 months agoin reply to this

                    Now THAT is another story, isn't it?  Would love to have been a bug on the wall during HER interview!

                    Did he take the race road, basically saying black students were allowed to do that?  Did he question her racism? Did he ream her for calling over nothing, opening the door to abuse because the students ARE the eyes of security?  Did he bring up the 2nd episode and question just why she was doing it?  Did he (somehow) indicate just how foolish the call had been, considering all the factors?

                    Would have loved to be there.

      3. dianetrotter profile image68
        dianetrotterposted 17 months agoin reply to this

        Starbucks and city of Philadelphia reach settlement with 2 arrested men

        The announcement came the same day the two men reached a settlement with the city of Philadelphia. Under that agreement, the two men will each get a symbolic $1 each and the city pledged $200,000 to start a program for young entrepreneurs.

        http://fox61.com/2018/05/02/black-men-a … =related_1

        The guys were real estate professionals waiting to meet someone else.  Why would they be asked to leave?

        1. wilderness profile image94
          wildernessposted 17 months agoin reply to this

          I wasn't there and cannot say.  But to free up space for paying customers?  Because the manager had past disputes with them?  Because they commonly used Starbucks as their personal office space?

          Yes, the city settled with them.  So did Starbucks, paying for their college costs.

    3. dianetrotter profile image68
      dianetrotterposted 17 months agoin reply to this

      Graphic: Police officer suspended following arrest of 65-year-old woman

      A suburban Atlanta police officer resigned after his department said he used foul language and inappropriate tactics during the arrest of a 65-year-old grandmother during a traffic stop, recorded on a police dashboard camera.

      http://fox61.com/2018/05/11/graphic-pol … old-woman/

    4. GA Anderson profile image92
      GA Andersonposted 17 months agoin reply to this

      Hi Diane, I see the direction the thread seems to be taking, and I think it is other than the point of your OP.

      Could your point be what is the changing determination of a threat? How do we deal with "personal" threats now, vs. "before?"

      As I read your examples, you seem to be asking are these serious threats that warrant a police call?

      Addressing that perspective, let me relate a story, (that I have related before), that I think illustrates our changing perspectives. And addresses your question - as I perceived it.

      The story is from Steve Harvey's Family Feud show. A 30-something male was asked: "We asked 100 people what would you do if some one insulted you? *Note; that is "insult" not assault.

      His first thought: Call the authorities! Of course I am giving away both my age and  my mindset when I say a 3o-something man thinks of calling the cops when he is insulted - what has this world come to?

      Really? Is that where our society is now, call the cops if someone insults you? Call the cops if you think a sleeping student is a trespasser?

      My answer is a "threat" should be an indicator of danger, but apparently that is a Neanderthal man thought nowadays.

      GA

      1. dianetrotter profile image68
        dianetrotterposted 17 months agoin reply to this

        GA!  You GET ME!  Thank you!

    5. dianetrotter profile image68
      dianetrotterposted 17 months agoin reply to this

      George Zimmerman charged with misdemeanor stalking
      BY AVERY ANAPOL - 05/07/18 03:35 PM EDT

      George Zimmerman, the Florida man who was acquitted in 2013 in the shooting death of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin, has been charged with a misdemeanor for allegedly stalking a private investigator.

      Court records allege that Zimmerman “did willfully, maliciously, and repeatedly follow, harass, or cyberstalk” Dennis Albert Warren.

      The charges were filed in March in Seminole County Court and say that Zimmerman stalked Warren in late December.

      The arraignment will take place on May 30.

      Zimmerman was famously acquitted for the shooting death of Martin, who was unarmed, alleging that he acted in self-defense.

      In 2016, a Florida man who claimed he shot at George Zimmerman in self-defense was sentenced to 20 years in prison after being found guilty of attempted second-degree murder.

      Matthew Apperson fired a single bullet at Zimmerman as the two were driving in May 2015.


      http://thehill.com/blogs/blog-briefing- … ssion=true

      Nuff said!

      1. Credence2 profile image81
        Credence2posted 17 months agoin reply to this

        I have always said since 2012, that this man is a chiseler and flunky of the highest order. Up to now he hasn't really atoned for the death of young Martin, yet.

        1. dianetrotter profile image68
          dianetrotterposted 17 months agoin reply to this

          Had he been properly jailed, other people wouldn't have to deal with his isht!  If he kills someone else, it's blood on the hands of the manipulative/manipulated jurors.

          1. wilderness profile image94
            wildernessposted 17 months agoin reply to this

            You know, this fits into your thread pretty well.  Martin was afraid at being watched...and his response was not to simply call the cops but to attack.  There is no reason to think Zimmerman would ever have done anything if Martin had just walked on or had called the cops, but he lost his life because he completely overreacted to a perceived threat.  Instead of being questioned by the Dean of a school, he died.  Rather shows what CAN happen with such overreaction.

            1. dianetrotter profile image68
              dianetrotterposted 17 months agoin reply to this

              ?  Why didn't Zimmerman continue to Target.  He called the police.  He should have let them handle it.

      2. wilderness profile image94
        wildernessposted 17 months agoin reply to this

        Wait.  Zimmerman has been charged with a crime and it's "nuff said"?!?

        Zimmerman was shot at by a man that was convicted of attempted murder (apparently mentioned to spin up what a bad person Zimmerman is) and it's "nuff said"?!?

        Have we set aside the concept of "due process" now?  We'll just jail people based on media reports and public opinion?  Is the hanging mob back, with "mob rule" rather than "rule by law"?

        1. dianetrotter profile image68
          dianetrotterposted 17 months agoin reply to this

          My comment was about George Zimmerman's tendency to always be involved in trouble.  He was found not guilty for some reason.  He was on his way to Target but decided to follow and kill a Black kid and made up all kinds of  reasons for following him.  The jury had an attorney's wife for foreman.  She me with her husband though hey were sequestered and had undo influence on oher jurors.

          Trayvon Martin was a Black kid, walking from the store, talking on the cellphone.  He should be alive today or at least lived through that night.

          1. wilderness profile image94
            wildernessposted 17 months agoin reply to this

            And MY comment was on what the results of  fear can be if it is given free rein.

            One person is afraid and calls the cops over nothing.  Another is afraid and attacks the one he fears.  The results were tragic beyond what he could possibly have thought would happen.

            1. dianetrotter profile image68
              dianetrotterposted 17 months agoin reply to this

              Sounds like you Are sYing the kid attacked the wannabee cop.  We'd have to take Zimmerman s word for it.

              1. wilderness profile image94
                wildernessposted 17 months agoin reply to this

                I do believe that's exactly what they jury, given ALL the facts, did.  The defense of self defense could not have been used otherwise.

                But don't see that that has anything to do with what to do when afraid.

    6. dianetrotter profile image68
      dianetrotterposted 17 months agoin reply to this

      WATCH: White woman calls the cops on black man who’s trying to fix up house in her neighborhood

      When the police arrived on the scene, Hayes calmly explained the situation to the officers, who were sympathetic to what he was saying. They then asked the woman in the neighboring house to let him do his job.

      The woman tells the officers that he can do his job — but then she glares at him and tells him, “Hurry up, do it, and get out!”

      https://www.rawstory.com/2018/05/watch- … ghborhood/

    7. Don W profile image82
      Don Wposted 17 months agoin reply to this

      "How do you determine whether a person is a threat"

      Use the WHAT protocol.

      What are they doing?

      Are they being violent or are they just doing something that seems out-of-place?
      Are they attempting to hide/conceal something?
      Are they following someone?
      Are they taking unusual interest in security arrangements, for example trying to see key codes

      How are they behaving?

      Do they seem calm or agitated?
      Are they trying to avoid detection?
      Could they be influenced by drink or drugs?
      Are they being confrontational?

      Alone or acting with others?

      Are they with other people?
      If so, do they seem to be acting with a common purpose (e.g., all moving together?)
      Have they been with other people who have moved away?
      Are they pretending not to be with other people?

      Threat – What type do they pose?

      Are they carrying an obvious weapon?
      Do they appear to be concealing a weapon?
      Are they carrying a bag or other container?
      Are they holding something that could be used as a weapon?
      Have they made a verbal threat (e.g. I have a gun in my bag)

      This protocol is not fool-proof, but it's useful. Try applying it to the scenarios you referred to.

      1. dianetrotter profile image68
        dianetrotterposted 17 months agoin reply to this

        This is really helpful at night on college campuses, in parking lots, and just in general.  It's good to be alert.  Many people walk with headphones on or texting.  Some people that are upset are so involved in what they are  doing that they don't look around.

        When people get driving violations they can go to traffic school to avoid paying a ticket or having insurance violation.  Maybe when people call the police over stupid stuff, they should be required to take a class or get fined for harrassing the public and the police.

        1. wilderness profile image94
          wildernessposted 17 months agoin reply to this

          "Many people walk with headphones on or texting."

          When you aren't paying enough attention to avoid toppling into a fountain (remember that? big_smile) you aren't paying enough attention to your environment to even THINK about avoiding an attack.

          I don't know about fining people for making stupid calls, though.  That seems a sure fire way to eliminate any possible civilian help in preventing crime.  Maybe for the 4th bogus call in a year?

          1. dianetrotter profile image68
            dianetrotterposted 17 months agoin reply to this

            How about the 3rd?  3 strikes and you are fined!

        2. Don W profile image82
          Don Wposted 17 months agoin reply to this

          Is "wasting police time" an offense in some places? I agree with Wilderness though, going too far in that direction may discourage reporting.

          A 3 strikes rule sounds fair though. 3 in a year might be too generous. Maybe 3 total.

          I think we just created a new law. Quick, someone sign something..

          1. dianetrotter profile image68
            dianetrotterposted 17 months agoin reply to this

            There are places where there are shortages of officers.  Call in for a person taking a nap and then somebody robs a bank a half mile away.  The robbers get away because the officers are checking the correct spelling of a napper's name.

            My niece was just promoted to IA in Arkansas.  Officers there are working overtime because of the high crime rate.

            Each bogus call costs money and resources.  It's like setting off a fire alarm in one  place when the fire is a mile away.

            1. dianetrotter profile image68
              dianetrotterposted 17 months agoin reply to this

              Forgot the most important thing, infringing on another person's right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.  Add respect and dignity to that.  Situations like this could lead to a deadly confrontation.

            2. wilderness profile image94
              wildernessposted 17 months agoin reply to this

              "BERLIN (AP) — Police were called to investigate a domestic disturbance in a southern German town — and found a man arguing with a parrot.

              A resident in Loerrach, near the Swiss border, called the emergency number Monday to report his concerns about loud shouting from a next-door apartment that had been going on for some time.

              Police said Tuesday that officers sent to the scene found there was a loud argument going on — but it was between a 22-year-old man and a parrot. The man told them he had been annoyed with the bird, which belonged to his girlfriend.

              The parrot responded to being shouted at with loud noises of its own. Police said it couldn't speak but could bark like a dog.

              Since no one was hurt, the officers left."

              https://www.yahoo.com/news/domestic-dis … 43145.html

              1. dianetrotter profile image68
                dianetrotterposted 17 months agoin reply to this

                When I lived in an aparment, I would call the police if there was a fight in the apartment next door.  I would let them know because those cases are the most dangerous - domestic.

                Parrot?  I love it!

    8. dianetrotter profile image68
      dianetrotterposted 17 months agoin reply to this

      HELP!!!  POLICE!!!!

      Woman Caught on Camera Defecating on Floor of a Tim Hortons and Throwing Feces at an Employee

      ALEXIA FERNANDEZ May 17, 2018 01:12 AM
      A woman defecated inside of a Tim Hortons restaurant in Canada and threw her feces at an employee after she grew irate during an argument.

      The woman, who remains unnamed, was arrested Monday by Royal Canadian Mounted Police in Langley, British Columbia, where the fast food restaurant where the incident occurred is located, according to The Province.

      A rep for Tim Hortons did not immediately respond to PEOPLE’s request for comment.

      Surveillance video of the incident posted on YouTube on Wednesday showing the woman verbally berate the employee before squatting on the floor and defecating. A barrier behind her prevented other patrons from witnessing the incident.

    9. dianetrotter profile image68
      dianetrotterposted 17 months agoin reply to this

      Identify the threat here.

      https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/14043872.png

      At least they just called park security.
      https://www.rawstory.com/2018/05/black- … baby-park/

      1. wilderness profile image94
        wildernessposted 17 months agoin reply to this

        It is SO easy to pick up a wrong perception isn't it?

        Was he acting furtive?  Was he casing the cars nearby?  Was he stumbling or weaving?  Did he have something mistaken for a gun?  Was the temperature too low for a small, immobile child dressed like that?  Too hot?
        Was he walking on the grass?  Was there a suspicious chemical odor about him?  Did he make a furtive transaction/trade minutes before?  About the only thing we can know from the link is that he lied (parks large enough to warrant roving "special police" in a car are too large for him to know there was no one else in the park).  That and that security found nothing to raise suspicions.

        (You DID ask to have the potential threat identified)

        Yet the obvious inference is that whoever reported him was afraid, and almost certainly because he was black.  While that could be the truth, and the perceptions of the "reporter" were grossly distorted from reality, that inference could be just as distorted.

        Keep in mind that we are not privy to the conversation with security and have no statement from whoever called security, only with the claims of the person that was doing no wrong and was offended to have security talk to him.

    10. dianetrotter profile image68
      dianetrotterposted 17 months agoin reply to this

      Officers disciplined in arrest of NBA's Sterling Brown, police chief says

      https://www.cnn.com/2018/05/23/us/milwa … index.html

      https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/14055259_f1024.jpg

 
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