Hate Crime Hoaxes Are More Common Than You Realize

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  1. Readmikenow profile image97
    Readmikenowposted 8 weeks ago

    https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/14428556_f1024.jpg
    Wilfred Reilly is a black man and an associate professor of political science at Kentucky State University, a historically Black institution located in Frankfort. Reilly is the author of the upcoming book Hate Crime Hoax that covers hundreds of hate crime hoaxes.

    I wonder why they happen as well as why they are so accepted.

    Here is his article in USA Today.

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/ … 950146002/

    1. crankalicious profile image91
      crankaliciousposted 8 weeks agoin reply to this

      I wouldn't want to be the target of either a false hate crime accusation or a false rape accusation.

      However, when one considers how many more actual rapes there are than false rape allegations and how many actual hate crimes there are as opposed to false hate crime hoaxes, one has to wonder about those who would spend more of their energy on the false charges than on the actual offenses.

      Like any other situation, there are always going to be individuals who try to take advantage of a situation. Think about all the scumbags who spend their time with phishing schemes, trying to rip-off innocent people. There are always going to be people who take advantage of others.

      One reason that a lot of these hoaxes are reported is over-eager, under-trained reporters who fall for this stuff and newspaper and tv stations more interested in attracting viewers then in getting to the truth. Remember the old adage: "if it bleeds, it leads."

      That said, people who make false allegations are exploiting situations for their own benefit and should be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law.

      1. wilderness profile image96
        wildernessposted 8 weeks agoin reply to this

        "...one has to wonder about those who would spend more of their energy on the false charges than on the actual offenses."

        If you refer to police and the courts there isn't much choice.  We do not (thank goodness) give them the ability to declare guilt or innocence without a trial.  The charges must be checked.  And when found false they must be prosecuted; to fail to do so will do far more damage than "wasting" time in prosecuting them.

        1. crankalicious profile image91
          crankaliciousposted 8 weeks agoin reply to this

          Yes, we must take false accusations seriously and prosecute them to the fullest extent of the law because they diminish the real accusations.

          I'm not referring to the police and the courts, just individuals who would focus their attention more on false accusations than on real ones. Rapes are a good example. Does one spend their energy focusing on violence against women or the few people (as a percentage of the overall number of rapes both reported and unreported) who may be falsely accused?

          1. wilderness profile image96
            wildernessposted 8 weeks agoin reply to this

            Probably on the false ones.  Why?  Is it because they are (relatively) unusual? Is it because they take great offense at the diminishing of true claims?  Is it because they feel they have walked that line themselves, if only closely without crossing?  Is it fear that they could be accused falsely themselves?

            Seems to me that the reason, hidden or very apparent, makes a big difference.

  2. Live to Learn profile image82
    Live to Learnposted 8 weeks ago

    I think the part of the public who falls for them either grew up in, or have chosen to live in areas with little racial diversity. They see things in black and white and choose to use color only to judge events. Those of us participating in a multicultural environment understand that many acts can, on the surface, be judged racially motivated but people are just people, and many times the impetus has nothing to do with color.

    Hate crimes are real and true hate crimes should be punished to the extent of the law, as should any act of violence. But judging something as a hate crime just because of skin color is ridiculous and fabricating hate crimes is an exercise in racial hatred.

    1. Readmikenow profile image97
      Readmikenowposted 8 weeks agoin reply to this

      Do you think our society has been conditioned to believe only white people are racist and commit racist acts?  Gays are always innocent victims.  Is this why these hoaxes are able to happen so often?  Could our society handle it if this was proven to not be true?  Is it easier to simply follow what society says is true rather than dealing with facts and the truth?

      1. Live to Learn profile image82
        Live to Learnposted 8 weeks agoin reply to this

        I think we are wired to defend the underdog. So, any minority will probably garner more sympathy if claimed they are attacked.  Nor do I  think proving claims to be false will make the majority stop failing for it. Rumors are a beloved part of segments of society also. The more negative, the more that type of personality feeds on it.

        1. wilderness profile image96
          wildernessposted 8 weeks agoin reply to this

          Gossip.  It's called gossip, and is no different on the web today than it was 100 years ago over the back fence.  We see more of it now, perhaps, but the anonymity of the web is a great cloak to hide behind when doing something you know is wrong.

          1. crankalicious profile image91
            crankaliciousposted 8 weeks agoin reply to this

            Indeed! The internet is a place particularly susceptible to unsubstantiated stories, making it increasingly likely people will become increasingly unable to decipher fact from fiction.

  3. RTalloni profile image92
    RTalloniposted 8 weeks ago

    This discussion already has some thought-provoking ideas. I've pondered whether the people who fall for them are actually the ones who would commit them if they could get by with it.

    1. Readmikenow profile image97
      Readmikenowposted 8 weeks agoin reply to this

      Excellent point.

  4. Live to Learn profile image82
    Live to Learnposted 7 weeks ago

    I found this article to be relatively on point as to why we are being bombarded with fake hate crimes.

    https://thehill.com/opinion/campaign/43 … eral-media

    1. Readmikenow profile image97
      Readmikenowposted 7 weeks agoin reply to this

      LtL, excellent article.  The first sentence says it all "The Jussie Smollett hate crime hoax has once again brought the double standard of the liberal media and their role as propagandists into full view."

 
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