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Is matrimonial oath "till death do us apart" valid in as per legal jurisprudenc

  1. profile image58
    spock28posted 4 years ago

    Is matrimonial oath "till death do us apart" valid in  as per legal jurisprudence of the country?

    As the oath is taken without any pre condition , if court grants divorce for whatever reason can the aggrieved party claim damages for breaking the matrimonial oath

  2. dashingscorpio profile image88
    dashingscorpioposted 4 years ago

    All relationships are "at will". If someone is unhappy the declaration of independence guarantees states our belief that we have the right to pursue happiness. Even the constitution itself is allowed to be amended or changed.
    The idea of marriage is having two people who (want) to be together! It's never going to be a situation where just because there was a vow spoken and a marriage license signed that people will be (forced) against their will to remain with someone. Marriage is not a "steel trap". No one is "stuck" with anyone.
    Even within our criminal justice system we allow most criminals to get out of jail at some point.
    There is no "legal marital oath". Anyone can say whatever they want at their wedding ceremony. The legality part is the (marriage license) granted by the county/state. This is the reason why it is necessary to get a (divorce decree) to be considered legally single again. It's the license that makes the marriage official not the vows.
    No (marriage license) contains any language regarding "till death do us part." We can't hold the state liable because the person (we) chose to marry fell out of love with us. Each of us (chooses) our own friends, lovers, and spouse. Everyone is also entitled to have their own "deal breakers".
    I can't imagine wanting to be married to someone who did not want to be married to me. In order for them to be "the one" they'd have to see you as being "the one".

    1. profile image58
      spock28posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      In short what you mean a oath taken by two adults before God / Court is not meant to be honored and the aggrieved party can’t claim damages! I If that is so the marriage vows should be changed t reflect modern times!!

    2. dashingscorpio profile image88
      dashingscorpioposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      No, I'm saying marriage vows aren't legal documents. No law will force one to stay in an unhappy/toxic marriage. Couples choose vows!
      Most divorces usually end up costing one person more than another depending on the alimony or child support laws

 
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