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Why does God need money??

  1. AshutoshJoshi06 profile image91
    AshutoshJoshi06posted 8 days ago

    In the name of the almighty, across faiths, billions of dollars, assets etc are donated each year to these franchises.
    Even if we assume that this is genuinely meant for charitable purpose, how much of it actually manages to trickle down for the real purpose?
    Isn't it also unfair on God's part to demand tax exemptions, despite all these freewill donations?

    1. Kathryn L Hill profile image82
      Kathryn L Hillposted 8 days agoin reply to this

      So, in conclusion: God does not need the money, people do. Something wrong with that? Only when some lie, cheat, steal and take unfair advantage. neutral

      1. AshutoshJoshi06 profile image91
        AshutoshJoshi06posted 8 days agoin reply to this

        Thank you for elaborating and yes ofcourse the conclusive argument.

        I guess there is a definite problem. I mean I do understand the running cost and all but the draining bit, just too much. And then we also have these startups that spring up at every nook and corner. They too claim to spread the message of god and demanding money in return to fund their lavish lifestyle!!

        1. MizBejabbers profile image89
          MizBejabbersposted 7 days agoin reply to this

          And the constant mailouts I get each couple of weeks are killing our forests. Save a tree, folks, I can't contribute to all your causes. I have my own charities I prefer to give to, and they don't bug me to death. (Perhaps that's why I prefer them.}

  2. Kathryn L Hill profile image82
    Kathryn L Hillposted 8 days ago

    You think God demands tax exemptions? You think all those freewill donations are enough to keep a parish, (*or church … not a "franchise,") operating so that it can fulfill its goodwill mission of bringing people the good news that God loves us and has rules of happiness to follow to make our lives meaningful and purposeful …
    without even charging?


    Of course, if there were no churches we could sit for free in natural clearings playing guitars and flutes and singing psalms to God. That would be okay with me too. smile

    1. Kathryn L Hill profile image82
      Kathryn L Hillposted 8 days agoin reply to this

      *franchise |ˈfranˌCHīz| noun
      1 an authorization granted by a government or company to an individual or group enabling them to carry out specified commercial activities, e.g., providing a broadcasting service or acting as an agent for a company's products.
      2 (usu. the franchise) the right to vote.
      verb
      grant a franchise to (an individual or group).

  3. Kathryn L Hill profile image82
    Kathryn L Hillposted 8 days ago

    Of course, maybe some broadcast religious franchises took unfair advantage. Tammy Fae Bakker et al for instance. But then, she in now in …. heaven??? lol

    "In 1989, Mr. Bakker was convicted of federal charges that he had bilked followers out of $158 million by offering lifetime vacations at Heritage USA while knowing he could not provide them and that he had diverted about $3.7 million to support an opulent lifestyle.

    The scandals forced the Bakkers to shut down their PTL program and eventually lose Heritage Village through bankruptcy.

    Mr. Bakker’s wife vowed to stand by her man. When he was found guilty of fraud and conspiracy, she appeared at a news conference and, in tears, sang, “On Christ the solid rock I stand/All other ground is sinking sand.”

    Three years later, she divorced Mr. Bakker, who by then was serving a 45-year prison sentence. In 1993, she married Mr. Messner, a wealthy contractor and former business associate of Mr. Bakker. Mr. Bakker, whose sentence had been reduced, was paroled in 1994. In 1996, Mr. Messner was sentenced to 27 months in federal prison for bankruptcy fraud.

    In the Bakkers’ heyday, they were criticized for their lavish homes and extravagant spending on items like matching Rolls-Royces and an air-conditioned dog house. Her troubles with drug dependency and depression made her a target of tabloid headlines."

    http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/22/us/22bakker.html

  4. MizBejabbers profile image89
    MizBejabbersposted 8 days ago

    God doesn't need money, greedy charlatans do. Look at all the big cathedrals, fine churches and other buildings such as mosques, temples, etc., many of which were built on the backs (tithes, taxes, slaves, lowly paid workers) of unfortunate people. Jesus had a few quotes on that, especially the one that the church was in the heart, not the building. You didn't say which "god", so I threw in some non-Christian ones, too.  Todays Christian churches do have some good programs for charity and youth that require money and volunteers, but they are also running private schools which are receiving vouchers from taxpayer money. Those definitely should not be tax exempt.

    Also your last question:

    "Isn't it also unfair on God's part to demand tax exemptions, despite all these freewill donations?"

    First, I don't think that it is "God" who is doing the demanding. It is the so-called human "representatives of God." I say yes to that because Jesus also had something to say that went something like Render unto God what is God's and unto Caesar what is Caesar's. I find it hypocritical for religious organizations to hide behind 501(c)(3) Corporations, especially when this has turned into big business for them. I think another good question would be:  Should churches pay taxes on the "imaginary wages" of volunteers.

    1. AshutoshJoshi06 profile image91
      AshutoshJoshi06posted 8 days agoin reply to this

      I don't understand, why should there be an exemption? Being funded and also being exmpted for what, spreading the word?? Charitable work is where that money supposed to go.
      I come from a "religiously obsessed" country, where these franchises, temples specifically rake in billions each year and so do the startups that use god as the idea to make in roads. But when it comes to giving back - zilch!!

      1. MizBejabbers profile image89
        MizBejabbersposted 7 days agoin reply to this

        Ash, I was saying Yes to your question "isn't it unfair...," not yes it should be exempt. I don't believe these organizations should be exempt, and, furthermore, I don't care how much charitable work they do. Sorry if I didn't make what I was saying plain enough.

        1. AshutoshJoshi06 profile image91
          AshutoshJoshi06posted 7 days agoin reply to this

          That was definitely within my grasp! I just kind of went with the flow, didn't realize I was acknowledging the comment. Sorry about that and yes the feeling is mutual.

 
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