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jump to last post 1-7 of 7 discussions (14 posts)

Does religion help or hurt when raising kids?

  1. Jojo Yousef profile image71
    Jojo Yousefposted 3 years ago

    Does religion help or hurt when raising kids?

    https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/12371966_f260.jpg

  2. peachpurple profile image82
    peachpurpleposted 3 years ago

    a religion helps kid to know about humanity, faithful, sincerity and love for humans and animals. They learn what is evil and angel.

    1. Jojo Yousef profile image71
      Jojo Yousefposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Great answer

  3. getitrite profile image80
    getitriteposted 3 years ago

    Religion is completely unnecessary when raising children. If anything, it damages the critical thinking skills, before they can fully develop. Since all religions are no more than fairy tales, teaching it as FACT programs the child to live in a false reality permanently...going to churches...praying and worshipping characters that are only in the pages of fictitious books.
    That's why we see grown men and women declaring their fanatical allegiance to fictitious characters, that are only in ancient books, as if they were real. This can't be good.

    1. profile image0
      Stargrrlposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Absolute rubbish.  I cannot disagree with you more.  Children need Jesus.  Jesus said, let the children come to me.

    2. getitrite profile image80
      getitriteposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Yep Jesus said, let the children come to me.That's what I was taught as a child. But I never understood why His father drowned all those children, or why He killed the first born children in Egypt.Its psychological abuse to teach such cruelty as love

    3. chuckandus6 profile image77
      chuckandus6posted 3 years agoin reply to this

      you can disagree even debate your side but it's not right to call someone's feelings rubbish,the world is a very diverse place and everyone has the right to express their thoughts

  4. chuckandus6 profile image77
    chuckandus6posted 3 years ago

    I think it depends on how people use it, some people can take it too far and make the child feel like they are never good enough.As long as they are teaching them that God forgives and understands our heart, and will help them through the struggles in their lives,I think then it would be good for children to have a belief in God.

  5. Aime F profile image84
    Aime Fposted 3 years ago

    It probably depends on how it's introduced and how the child responds.

    My mom is agnostic and my dad was an atheist, so I wasn't introduced to any specific religion until I was 11 and went to a Christian camp with my friends. By that point I was already a loving, respectful, caring human being... so I certainly don't believe that religion is necessary to achieve that.

    I was apparently at a very impressionable age when I went to the Christian camp, because it took me all of like a day to jump on board. I even signed this certificate declaring myself a Christian before leaving (which in hindsight makes me a bit uncomfortable). Anyway, I went home considering myself a Christian after only A WEEK there and wanted to go out and buy a Bible, crosses, etc. I think my parents' reaction to this taught me one of the biggest things I ever need to know about raising a child. They supported me, 100%. They talked to me about it, they bought me the Bible, they took an interest despite not being Christians themselves. They accepted my exploration of religion.

    I actually considered myself a Christian for years, until I was about 16. My dad died shortly after I started questioning my faith and that pretty much signalled the end. I took religious studies in college, partook in Buddhist ceremonies and submerged myself in it while in Japan. I looked and learned and took the time to think about things. It's a huge part of who I am today and I am very, very thankful that my parents let me do it.

    So, I plan on telling my kids about different religions when they're old enough. I plan on telling them they can choose and think for themselves. I think that being open and honest about religion helps raise kids. There's a lot I like about Buddhism and Christianity without identifying as either a Buddhist or a Christian. I understand how certain principles would be helpful in raising a child. But I think teaching them that ONE and only one is the correct religion is a hindrance.

    1. profile image0
      TheBizWhizposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Your parents seem like pretty open minded people. Good for you to have them raise you in such a way. I am sure you have benefited much from their example.

  6. profile image0
    TheBizWhizposted 3 years ago

    I think it can only help. I was raised Catholic (I still am btw), but my parents didn't beat every right or wrong by using religion. What my parents did was take me to church, guide me while I participated in the sacraments, and lead by example. Actions speak louder than words and showing a child how to do something is more productive than telling a child not to do something "just because we are told it is right".

    I know there are times that religion can hurt, especially when presented by someone who is fanatical. In my experience, most people become atheists because of external factors, not by just realizing there is no God. Pushing religion to hard on someone can be a turn-off and actually produce the opposite result that the pusher intended.

    1. chuckandus6 profile image77
      chuckandus6posted 3 years agoin reply to this

      well said I completely agree some people complicate religion to much.

    2. profile image0
      TheBizWhizposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Yes, some people do, but most do not. The problem is it is the loudmouths that get most of the press, so they seem to be the representatives.

  7. tamarawilhite profile image92
    tamarawilhiteposted 3 years ago

    This truly depends on how you use it.

    Using it as a set of basic rules to climb up from the chaos, basis for kindness and compassion and patience, lessons in self control and long term planning, it is good.

    Beat kids literally for not memorizing a segment of the holy book, use it to oppress women (wear the head scarf for fear of acid thrown in your face or honor killings), teach them terror for violating a minor commandment, and it is an evil.

 
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