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Why ore so many young people mixed up?

  1. profile image59
    haj3396posted 6 years ago

    Some young people think they came from frogs, some think that are reincarnated, in to a dog, or tree,or a bird, some young people think their life is not worth anything. But, I here to tell you, stop comparing yourself to other, you are worth more than anyone, anything or even you can imagine. Talk to me and I will show you your worth.

    1. profile image0
      Brenda Durhamposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      The young people aren't getting proper guidance.  They're being taught things that disconnect them from God and His laws.

      It would be nice if they'd ask for moral guidance, because many people who try to help them are being bullied into staying away.

      1. Cagsil profile image61
        Cagsilposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        roll

        1. Jim Hunter profile image60
          Jim Hunterposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          roll

          1. Druid Dude profile image59
            Druid Dudeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            All you need do is to "read" Jim and Cag's comment. That explains the high level of apostasy.

            1. Jim Hunter profile image60
              Jim Hunterposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              roll

              1. Druid Dude profile image59
                Druid Dudeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                No sense of humor? Evident Cag needs to look a word up.smile

                1. Jim Hunter profile image60
                  Jim Hunterposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  lol

                  1. Druid Dude profile image59
                    Druid Dudeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                    THAT'S MORE LIKE IT!

            2. Cagsil profile image61
              Cagsilposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              Interesting. hmm

      2. Woman Of Courage profile image62
        Woman Of Courageposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Brenda, I agree. There are many young people who need someone to teach them right from wrong. Secondly, there are many fathers absent from the children's live, especially boys.

      3. profile image0
        Twenty One Daysposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Indeed, both religion and science/technology have slowly --and divisively-- pulled humans away from Creator. So, now we know the problem. What is the solution?

    2. pylos26 profile image76
      pylos26posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Doesn’t take a very smart person to see why some young folk are confused. 

      They’re hung up between their education and the lies of religion.

      Education and religion are like oil and water, the two just don’t mix.

      Religious fanatics (about all believers on these threads) should discourage their children from further education above the sixth grade.  That way their childhood religious indoctrination may not fade away.

      1. Druid Dude profile image59
        Druid Dudeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Education and religious beliefs are the primary responsibilities of the PARENTS.

        1. Druid Dude profile image59
          Druid Dudeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Your statement shows an incredible degree of latent ignorance on your part. Better not to talk in that case, cause YOUR kids are part of the problem.

          1. Jim Hunter profile image60
            Jim Hunterposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            Are you telling yourself that?

            Now that is funny.

            1. Druid Dude profile image59
              Druid Dudeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              If you deny parental responsibility, your statement isn't funny...it's really sad, and only backs me up. Got kids Jim? DO you feel better letting others give your kids their core values?

        2. pylos26 profile image76
          pylos26posted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Sounds like a religious opinion. Indoctrinating Religion into a child is not a sane parent's responsibility.

        3. pylos26 profile image76
          pylos26posted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Just what we need here…another babbling preacher pitching fairy tales as truth for his keep.

          Get a job mister and earn an honest keep like everyone else.

      2. qwark profile image60
        qwarkposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Pylos, old boy, ya hit the nail right on the head!
        Standing ovation!!!!
        Hey Pylos, I've read everyone of your "hubs." Why don't you read mine?
        It just ain't fair!...lol   :-)

    3. prettydarkhorse profile image63
      prettydarkhorseposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      identity crisis during adolescence period

      1. Druid Dude profile image59
        Druid Dudeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        What's really dumb? 30 is the new twenty. Can we say "Peter Pan Syndrome"? Which is a real psychiatric diagnoses

    4. rebekahELLE profile image88
      rebekahELLEposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I don't think this is anything new. young people should question and find answers. youth have always seemed what some call 'mixed up'.  the adults job is to teach them how to think and reason and question, not what to think.

      are they only 'normal' if they believe what you want them to believe?

      1. profile image52
        heyhey772posted 6 years ago in reply to this

        I belive that,too. You so right.

    5. hanging out profile image57
      hanging outposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      from frogs!!!!!   oooooh that Baileybear.....  smile



      http://s1.hubimg.com/u/4026500.jpg

    6. profile image0
      Baileybearposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      how many youths attend church these days (excluding the ones that are forced to by their parents)?

      1. profile image52
        heyhey772posted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Well my step-father's daughter osn't forced to go but she wants to go.
        To Tell you the honest truth, I don't know. I am all honesty.

  2. dawnM profile image74
    dawnMposted 6 years ago

    Well if more children grew up in a home with more traditional values, eating dinner together, reading books at night to the kids.  Parents getting to know their kids friends and what they do in their free time.  Parents, parenting together and setting up proper rules and boundaries for children.  Bringing God into the home and making it a wonderful part of the kid’s life.  Extended families spending time with the kids, grandparents, and aunt’s cousin.  Family camping tips and BBQ, boy scouts and girl scouts.  Many children come home from school to and empty house and a rushed fast food dinner brought home by one parent, or pushed and pulled between parent’s homes.  That is the problem, not the kids it the parents, society and our lack of respect for marriage and family values!!!!!

    1. Druid Dude profile image59
      Druid Dudeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Throwing kids into the snakepit of our public education system doesn't help. The things they bring home with them!

      1. profile image0
        Baileybearposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        keeping kids in a religious bubble doesn't give them the coping skills to survive in the real world

    2. Woman Of Courage profile image62
      Woman Of Courageposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      dawn, I agree 100%. Children deserve to be in a healthy and happy family environment. It's very important.

    3. Shadesbreath profile image85
      Shadesbreathposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      You can remove the God element from that and have the exact same outcome.  For what its worth.  Children who grow up receiving and seeing loving, comitted and respectful behavoir between humans don't need a magical being to hold it together.  The respect and attitude of wholesomeness becomes who they are.

      1. Woman Of Courage profile image62
        Woman Of Courageposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        shadesbreath, You have a right to your belief, and we have a right to our belief. God is real, and not magical. Have a wonderful day.

        1. Shadesbreath profile image85
          Shadesbreathposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          You are quite right, we are free to believe as we like. I didn't say that God/ancestor spirit/alien soul/magic being/supernatural XYZ was or was not real.  I simply said that in the comment I was responding to, the God element of the statement was an unneccessary part.  The conclusion Dawnm draws does not require a magical being/God/ancestor spirit/supernatural anything.  That was my point. The existence or non existence of such a creature is entirely aside from the outcome being discussed in Dawnm's remark.

      2. Druid Dude profile image59
        Druid Dudeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Not bad...if everything on the planet is a human being. Plus, there are others concepts to be learned.

    4. Pcunix profile image88
      Pcunixposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      The only thing I disagree with is the religious part. It is not necessary. We raised two wonderful children without religion. Sometimes they are even more insistent on morals than we are - for example, we don't like Walmart but will shop there; our youngest simply will not, period.

      You don't need religion for values.

  3. Shadesbreath profile image85
    Shadesbreathposted 6 years ago

    The religions (and variations within them) that refuse to acknowledge modern realities and adapt to the needs of the modern populace will die out as they always have throughout history.  The ash heap of dead religions is as high as Everest, and there are lots of moribund faiths lying at its base, gasping out their last right now. 

    The flurry of information available these days make ridiculous and antiquated interpretations of scripture look idiotic to the young, plugged-in generations.  Empty pews (and coffers) directly correlate to the unwillingness (inability) of old guard denominations/faiths to stay relevant.  Pointing it out simply makes the old-style believers go into fits of defensiveness, which is fine, but also why, as an example, the Catholic Church, despite tossing Galileo into home arrest for life did nothing to prevent the reality of the planets from being what it is, or anything that followed those discoveries from coming about either… now that faith struggles for Northern Hemisphere relevance at all.

    Young people see planes hitting buildings, mobs protesting Mosques in New York, backpack bombs, furious Christians at rallies and funerals hoisting signs with hateful judgments and discriminatory rhetoric.  These youth would have to be idiots to be interested in religion.  Their visible, experiential reality is one in which religion on the whole is a force for violence and hate.

    So, they don’t seek you religious people out for guidance.  They see you as the source of why they feel like killing themselves.  They see you as the problem, not the solution. 

    And again, I’m not saying there aren’t sources of help for folks in need that are religious, but for the young, I don’t think they see much of that.  The evil forces using religion have ruined the reputation of it all.  The only way I see for good religious people to get more recruits is to stop talking about religion and just go actually DO good things.  Don’t even talk about religion at all. Ever.  Just do the good that it teaches.  Don’t say, “Jesus” or “Allah,” just be in places doing good things, all the time.  Until someone finally says, “Gosh, you are such a good kind person.  How do you find the strength to be so strong in the face of the poverty and violence in this neighborhood you have moved into and helped by sharing all your resources?”  Then, you will have a potential convert.  Until you have proven value, you are just talking.  Which is fine too, but it won’t sell your religion to anyone in a modern, scientific and religiously violent world.

    1. profile image0
      Baileybearposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I'm from generation X, and it was confusing to grow up in a family where their belief in god closes their minds to reality.  Can't imagine how it is for Gen Y

    2. Pcunix profile image88
      Pcunixposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      There are places that do that in a community setting - many Unitarian "churches" have no religion involved (though not all - my daughter told me of a group that tried to get religion back into her UU group).

      Anyway, assuming no crazed takeover by Born Agains, your local UU church might be a great place to take kids for community oriented moral guidance without the religious malarkey.

      Failing that, larger cities usually have active Humanist chapters.

      1. Shadesbreath profile image85
        Shadesbreathposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Humanist chapters is an interesting idea.  Seems useful in a time when cities are so large and Walmart is so large that it's hard to build a sense of community in the more natural sense from which the concept evolved.

        When the aliens finally show up, they'll either tell us what's really going on (as far as they have it figured out anyway) or they'll be mean and we will all be united in our common cause finally.  smile



        My kids are Gen Y, and it is from watching them and their friends reactions to the world they live in that I recognize the march to obsolescence of the significant religions of these last fifteen hundred years continuing.

    3. profile image0
      Brenda Durhamposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      JESUS the CHRIST,  the Savior, the name above all names!!!  Woohoo!  Hallelujah!  Praise God!  You are the AWESOME GOD that Loves the world so much You sent your only-begotten Son to die so that all people would have an opportunity to be saved! Thank you Jesus!

      And I pray to You the only wise God to shower the innocent youths of this world with Your grace, mercy, and Love, show them how to follow their God-given consciences and send teachers along their paths who will lead them in the right direction.  In the Holy name of Jesus.  Amen.


      (Just wanted to shout that out.  Anytime someone suggests I not mention Jesus, I feel like shouting it out even louder!  Thanks Shadesbreath! wink)

      1. Shadesbreath profile image85
        Shadesbreathposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Yes, I understand.  The words feel good.  It's so easy to praise Jesus.  What's hard is actually making the tiniest effort to live like him and go out and actually DO good and kind things for people, especially those deemed unsavory by society; that is the real stopper, ain't it?  But hey, keep typing. I'm sure He's very proud.

      2. profile image0
        Baileybearposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        does that make you feel better?  doubt it has helped troubled youths any - if any heard you, they'd think you're nuts

        1. Jewels profile image81
          Jewelsposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          lol

      3. mom101 profile image60
        mom101posted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Brenda, just told my boy you gave a shout out for the kids, and he said to tell you thank you they need it, now more than ever. And he says prayers are also sent out for you as well.

        1. Woman Of Courage profile image62
          Woman Of Courageposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          God is worthy to be praised! With all the things the youth have to face in this wicked generation, there is no doubt they need the prayers and the praise.

          1. Beelzedad profile image57
            Beelzedadposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            It is the believers who are in control, blame them for "this wicked generation."  smile

            1. profile image60
              exorterposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              Christians have control of everything, that is why there are no christians on unemployment, christians control the worlds economy, lets just blame them for everything, the stupid Christians won't let me vote, work or anything, they are even starving all the children in the world,  the greedy  #*+**#!'s

              1. Jerami profile image74
                Jeramiposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                You forgot to mention global warming and that earthquake a few weeks back.

                   They did that too!!  I took a vidio on my phone while they did it.

                  I got proof.

                1. stilljustwonderin profile image60
                  stilljustwonderinposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  The earthquake was my fault.  I fell down.

                  1. Jerami profile image74
                    Jeramiposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                    You need to be more careful...   Extorter   I'm sorry.

              2. stilljustwonderin profile image60
                stilljustwonderinposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                The unemployment rate is my fault too.  I got a job.  It should have been an unbelievers.

                1. profile image60
                  exorterposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  shame on you, I don't do any of it cause I just sit back at home and collect money that the christians take from the un-believers in taxes and stuff like that, I should not have started the Vietnam war, but since I did might as well get the money

  4. Jim Hunter profile image60
    Jim Hunterposted 6 years ago

    You don't know what you did do you?

    Let me help.

       

        Druid Dude wrote:

        Education and religious beliefs are the primary responsibilities of the PARENTS.

    Druid in reply to his own statement wrote
    Your statement shows an incredible degree of latent ignorance on your part. Better not to talk in that case, cause YOUR kids are part of the problem.

    Thats too damn funny.

    1. Druid Dude profile image59
      Druid Dudeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Sorry if you are sterile or impotent, Jim. I didn't mean to be mean. Actually, it's a good thing. Less confused kids in the world. smile

      1. Jim Hunter profile image60
        Jim Hunterposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Sorry you can't see the humor in someone responding to their own post calling their self ignorant.

        I giggled my ass off.

        1. Druid Dude profile image59
          Druid Dudeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Probably just a temporary onset of Delirium.

  5. dawnM profile image74
    dawnMposted 6 years ago

    Wow socked at the statement about God, what is so wrong with giving children some sense that they are being watched over, it does not have to been a way that is negative.  I am not extreme in religion and I can see where that can back fire, but it is also wonderful in many ways to have religion in a childs life.

    1. Druid Dude profile image59
      Druid Dudeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Forget them. dawn may rise, but not everyone can see the light. It frightens them. Get it, Dawn?

    2. Shadesbreath profile image85
      Shadesbreathposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Honestly, I believe it creates a reliance on or dependence on an unprovable entity.  As a psychological mechanism to help enforce moral rules, it certainly works (there was a recent experiment that illustrated this very well--experiments where children were given impossible tasks to perform: some were let alone to try and cheated when adults left the room, while others where told that an invisible princess was watching them and so did not cheat despite no adults being present).

      There may be a god, but I see no benefit in being sure of it lacking any evidence.  That defies reason.  If one's morals are rooted in the belief in something unreasonable, then, if that unreasonable idea falls under scrutiny, when it fails, the underpinnings of morality so based fail with it. 

      Better to raise children to be kind and loving because the life we have, that we can see, impacts others who we can also see.  What we do matters because it really does matter.  Right now.  Right here.  That sort of morality, taught early, has nothing to undermine it so easily as stories of invisible entities does.

      1. Druid Dude profile image59
        Druid Dudeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        THis is why logic, reason, the conscious, and sub-conscious are all involved. I turned to what you refer to as God, w/ no evidence, but shortly proof was revealed. Someone standing right next to me at that time, would have seen something "odd", for to see and be convinced of what they were seeing, would have required them to be able to read my mind. Since then, that which you refer to as God, proved immediate presence in several ways. Only once was this proof evident to anyone else. Each person has his or her own time to come to these things. God is WAY closer than you think. It would be funny, if it wasn't so important. In a way though, That which you refer to as God, probably can't stop laughing about it. Plain as the nose on your face, it is.

        1. Shadesbreath profile image85
          Shadesbreathposted 6 years ago in reply to this



          Well, clearly we've gotten to that place in this type of conversation where you are invoking stuff that by your own admission nobody else could verify "unless they were able to read your mind."  And then, just a few short lines later you tell me the evidence is "as clear as the nose on my face."

          Like I said, I prefer a more reasonable approach to my life than that, but I am happy for you that you believe you are favored by divine signals and that sort of thing.  Count yourself lucky to be amongst the favored few.  smile

          1. mom101 profile image60
            mom101posted 6 years ago in reply to this

            shadesbreath, have you ever played dominos

        2. mom101 profile image60
          mom101posted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Druid, so right

  6. dawnM profile image74
    dawnMposted 6 years ago

    well I guess what they say is true don’t discuss god, politics or religion...lol

    1. Druid Dude profile image59
      Druid Dudeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      If all humans stopped talking altogether....Ahhhh! HEAVEN!

    2. Druid Dude profile image59
      Druid Dudeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Discussion is good. Some who enter a debate seem to think that man has reached the end of our knowledge, our understanding. We know shamefully little about the earth, and even less about the universe. Atheism, itself, is a religion. Not an opinion....atheism was decided to be a religious belief by the definition of religion, and backed up by the US supreme court. Some in the forums are merely "Door Knockers", that is, the same thing as the zealots who come to your door looking to "save" you. Ridicule is not an accepted debate practice.

      1. mom101 profile image60
        mom101posted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Discussion is a good thang. Little about the earth/universe? Too bad we cant bottle the energy spent on "arguing" and put it to somethng productive.
        Atheism, christianity, whatever, they are "religions". Ridicule is a practise that is growing ever so rapidly that it may just soon qualify.

        Could someone answer this? What is the purpose of a debate?

        1. qwark profile image60
          qwarkposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          ..the purpose of a debate is to WIN!
          Debate requires "argument."
          To WIN
          an argument one must offer proofs.
          It's as simple as that.

          1. mom101 profile image60
            mom101posted 6 years ago in reply to this

            So is reasoning a part of a debate?

            1. qwark profile image60
              qwarkposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              Mom: of course.

          2. Jerami profile image74
            Jeramiposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            In debate the object is to win the arguement regardless of the truth.

               A true debater doesent care what side of the table he is on, he will be ruthless to order win.

               Is that right???

    3. Shadesbreath profile image85
      Shadesbreathposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Why not?

      Is it only worth discussing in groups of people who share your opinions?  I think it's interesting to seek convincing arguments.  Granted, they are hard to come by (especially respectfully delivered ones) on the forums.

      I would say that is what would render it pointless to discuss.  If we all agree, then the conversation would be painfully boring.

      "I like green.  Green is the best color."
      "Yep, it is. Green is great."
      "I have green socks."
      "Me too."
      "Do you like green beans?"
      "Yep."
      "You like red or blue?"
      "No."
      "Me neither."
      "..."
      "."

    4. Woman Of Courage profile image62
      Woman Of Courageposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Dawn, Lol,

  7. Disappearinghead profile image84
    Disappearingheadposted 6 years ago

    Don't know the answer but I do know that if you put a baby goat in cement mixer you get a crazy mixed up kid.

    1. Druid Dude profile image59
      Druid Dudeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      And a very strange looking patio

      1. Druid Dude profile image59
        Druid Dudeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        If the moral compass is overridden with polarized concepts, then you can be sure that you will no longer have a valid direction to go in. The compass needle merely spins.

        1. Pcunix profile image88
          Pcunixposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Well, it depends. Children need moral grounding, but if they are bright enough, it doesn't have to be by fiat. Bright children can understand moral ambiguity and it can be very helpful to discuss difficult moral decisions with them when the opportunity arises.  Of course some may not be bright enough for that; they may need strict rules accompanied by threats.  But even then, you don't need religion: cops, prison and societal dislike are enough.

          1. Druid Dude profile image59
            Druid Dudeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            Being that, historically speaking, the spiritual leaders have always been the ones to "define" morality, it is like cursing the foundation because the roof is rotten. It all had to start somewhere. Consider that I insist that our understanding of something which is at once real and corporeal has evolved. Does that evolution necessitate the demise of religion? I also see a separation between spirituality and religion, but that, in and of itself is a religion. Religion is roughly defined as: A belief, or system of beliefs, which determines how you live your daily life. Can't be done away with. Now can it. Dogs chasing their own tails (tales) Little play there. We need an evolution of religion.

            1. Pcunix profile image88
              Pcunixposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              If you want to define religion as something that doesn't include imaginary beings, fine. But that's not a common definition at all.

  8. seanorjohn profile image81
    seanorjohnposted 6 years ago

    They don't watch the simpsons.

  9. frogdropping profile image85
    frogdroppingposted 6 years ago

    Some young people have been mixed up all through the ages. It is nothing new.

    @ Shades - I'm with you there. I very much doubt that religion is to be used to mock or deride. Of my friends that are devout, none would ever use their faith in such a fashion.

    1. qwark profile image60
      qwarkposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      That isn't the point Frog.
      Those of your friends who are "believers" in mythical divinties, believe in that which has been the cause of more death and destruction to humanity than any concept but the automobile!
      They are the easily led! The followers! The weak! The ignorant!
      They give lip service in ref to love and peace when that which they tout is deadly and regressive.
      They are not the open minded students of life and reality!
      They are frustrated by their beliefs and will not broaden their thinking abilities to the point of desiring the enlightenment which education and serious thought could bring them.
      They are obsequious human sheep who are sheep in "wolves" clothing!
      I also have friends who are deeply monotheistic. I keep our friendship at arms length because I understand their weakness and don't want to offend them by offering "truths" backed by empirical evidence.
      Their "programming" would cause them to ostracize me.
      I try to get along with everyone, to a point!
      I wish no harm to anyone but the deserving...that's a subject for a "hub." lol

      1. frogdropping profile image85
        frogdroppingposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        I know qwark. But it was mine.

      2. Jewels profile image81
        Jewelsposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        qwark, you don't see you are also running a program and being run by one?  Just putting that out there in case you have everything squared away smile

        1. qwark profile image60
          qwarkposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Oh yes Jewel:
          ...but I am a "pragmatic realist" with age and alota formal education programming my thinking!
          There is nothing I can think of, that I write about, that cannot be backed up with "fact."
          Now tell me that monotheists can do that?

  10. Jewels profile image81
    Jewelsposted 6 years ago

    I'm with you Shades.  The switched on Gen Y's are amazing and won't have a bar of the religious for one.  They are very aware of the previous generations legacy of destruction, greed and stupidity.  Many Gen Y's are rebellious, who would blame them.  To conform to what obviously doesn't serve anyone is hideous.  Those that are not 'switched on' are lapping up the ease of credit card abuse and follow nicely along the path of consumer indulgence.

  11. secularist10 profile image87
    secularist10posted 6 years ago

    "Some young people think they came from frogs"

    Personally, I think I came from the forehead of Zeus. Either that, or Bumba vomited me into existence.

    6 in one I guess...

    1. mom101 profile image60
      mom101posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      The aliens must have landed. I hear talk of kids from gen y and x.  Have I been held hostage and taken to the unknown?

      1. profile image0
        Baileybearposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        that's the lingo used for describing generations.  Are you a baby boomer?

        1. mom101 profile image60
          mom101posted 6 years ago in reply to this

          I hardly think so. I just have one child.

          1. profile image0
            Baileybearposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            I'm in my late 30s & am gen X

            1. mom101 profile image60
              mom101posted 6 years ago in reply to this

              My son, he turned 17 yesterday, and I asked him if he was from a generation x or y and he said x of course. I still didn't understand, and he told me he was xtreme.

              Dang sure was begining to worry for a minute there.

              1. profile image0
                Baileybearposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                think each generation spans approx 20 years.  Think he'd be gen y, but not sure

                1. mom101 profile image60
                  mom101posted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  Let me see if I get this...Adam would be generation a     and we follow through the alphabet til we get to z and then start over again?

                  1. mom101 profile image60
                    mom101posted 6 years ago in reply to this

                    I see why the question is why are so many young people mixed up.

                  2. secularist10 profile image87
                    secularist10posted 6 years ago in reply to this

                    Haha, no actually since the Latin alphabet didn't exist yet, Adam would be generation Alpha or something like that.

                    Not sure how it works in other countries, but here in the US, the "baby boomers" are those born between the end of World War II and the mid or late 60s. Generation X are born in the 1970s and early 80s, and Generation Y are born from the mid 1980s to the mid-late 1990s, more or less. Generation Y are also sometimes referred to as the "Echo Boomers" because many are the progeny of mid to late Baby Boomers. Also referred to as "Millennials" because of the proximity to the new millennium, I suppose.

                    Probably in a few years we'll have to come up with a new designation for kids born in more recent years.

    2. Jewels profile image81
      Jewelsposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Zeus is cool, I could live with that! cool

  12. NickB profile image60
    NickBposted 6 years ago

    Wow, another Jesus freaks vs. Atheists debate on the internet. And I thought tonight was going to be a dull night.Yawn roll.

  13. pylos26 profile image76
    pylos26posted 6 years ago

    Hi Qwark…good to see you back…guess you’ve put down the anchor for winter. I read your stuff Qwark.

    1. qwark profile image60
      qwarkposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Yeh I have ...on the coast of the gulf of mexico....nice place.
      I'm glad ya read my "stuff." lol

      1. Druid Dude profile image59
        Druid Dudeposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Young people aren't as messed up as their parents. Appearrances can be verrrry deceiving.

        1. mom101 profile image60
          mom101posted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Do whaaaaat?

          1. mom101 profile image60
            mom101posted 6 years ago in reply to this

            baggy drawers n all, I get it.

 
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