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jump to last post 1-6 of 6 discussions (6 posts)

Will cheap ill fitting shoes be the death of civilization? I am angry that shoes

  1. ptosis profile image80
    ptosisposted 7 years ago

    Will cheap ill fitting shoes be the death of civilization? I am angry that shoes don't last long!

    According the the radio version of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy,
    Frogstar B was thrown into poverty through an event termed the Shoe Event Horizon.  - more & more shoes being made more unwearable. The worse and more unwearable the shoes became, the more people bought them until it became economically impossible to build anything other than cheap ill -fitting shoes. The result was collapse, ruin, and famine.

    https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/4892257_f260.jpg

  2. J.S.Matthew profile image82
    J.S.Matthewposted 7 years ago

    Back in the day there were people who were craftsman in the trade of shoe making. They could custom make shoes and repair them when needed. Those people are still around but are a dying breed. They are called "Shoe Smiths", Shoe Makers", and most revered as "Cobblers".

    Now we have factories that mass produce shoes, often overseas exploiting cheap labor in poor countries. The shoes are made at very little cost to the corporations and are marked up in price further exploiting the buyers.

    As in many products on the market, shoe design includes "Planned Obsolescence", a concept where a product is designed to fail so that you have to buy more products. This is also the case in vehicles.

    JSMatthew~

  3. juniorsbook profile image74
    juniorsbookposted 7 years ago

    Ill-fitting shoes can result in a variety of conditions that will not only make your foot look unattractive, but will also cause it to be in pain for a much longer period of time, whether the shoes are on them or not.

    Common ailments that can develop if a person continuously wears ill-fitting shoes: Blisters, Bruises, Plantar Fasciitis, Bunions, Corns & Calluses, Morton's Neuroma Metatarsalgia, Hammertoes and Claw Toes

    4 in 10 women buy shoes knowing they do not fit.12% of women wear smaller than average shoes. 80% of women suffer with foot problems.

    37%  of women would wear uncomfortable shoes as long as they were fashionable. Popular high street footwear is not always tailored to fit every shape of foot.

    Almost all women are wearing shoes 20% too narrow at the ball. 36% need wider shoes than what is readily available.
    Walking in ill-fitting footwear can cause accidents at home. Wrong footwear is conductive to falling.

    Ill-fitting footwear causes pain, particularly in areas like backs and knees. Aches and flat feet are also attributable to ill-fitting shoes.

    It is estimated that there are around 64,000 individuals with active foot ulceration requiring 2,600 amputations annually.

    Driving in inappropriate footwear puts drivers at risk of a road accident. Stilettos and high-heels are one of the biggest risks as they can become stuck under pedals or slip off.

    The conclusion is that cheap ill fitting shoes surely are making way for the death of civilization and most people including you are angry that shoes don't last long! are absolutely correct.

  4. kentuckyslone profile image87
    kentuckysloneposted 7 years ago

    I have bought shoes for my kids and for myself and other family for years and years. For the most part there just isnt that much difference in the actual quality of shoes (or much of anything else) A $135 pair of shoes will not outlast or outwear most $15 shoes. Folks are paying for the design and for the name in many cases. If people wouldnt be so superficial and we could rid ourselves of the  "gotta have the whatever is the current big brand name" syndrome things may not be this way.

    Bottom line that shoe company doesnt care about anything other than the bottom line. If your shoes last too long they won't feel that they are making the optimal profit margin from you.

  5. OldSkoolFool profile image60
    OldSkoolFoolposted 7 years ago

    There's a great question when it comes to commercial products. They say "fast, cheap and good; pick any two" Unfortunately, you can't have your cake and eat it too. You're either going to have to buy expensive shoes that last long or cheap shoes that won't.

  6. christiansister profile image59
    christiansisterposted 7 years ago

    This is a link to a video that goes thru this whole concept. It is very informative and answers this question in my opinion. It is worth the time to watch it. It is a little dated, but more relevant today than it was when it was made. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gLBE5QAYXp8 smile

 
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