Fashion and old-fashion

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  1. Hui (蕙) profile image80
    Hui (蕙)posted 7 years ago

    There used to be a theory about fashion period, which is about 70 years, i.e. fashion design is a spiral rising. In another words, clothes several years ago are old-fashion, but those changed based on styles several decades years ago or even the same styles are fashion. What do you think?

    1. SoleiMarie profile image53
      SoleiMarieposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      I can't imagine myself wearing these dresses. I like the way it looks. It echo femininity but still I don't want to wear it.. I want comfortable clothes may not be as fashionable as that.

      1. Hui (蕙) profile image80
        Hui (蕙)posted 7 years agoin reply to this

        So do I. After all, we live in a modern time. But the theory talks about "spiral rising", which means innovative change based on old design. For example, I have a suspender with classical laces and buttons. I really like it. Modern designers turn to old times for creative ideas, which is a good way. Of course, those officially classic costumes are only appriciated as cultural heritages, or used in special occassions. smile

  2. profile image0
    Sherlock221bposted 7 years ago

    I think fashions in the past did repeat, almost on a hundred year basis.  Women's fashion of the early 20th century, with its emphasis on the empire line, was very similar to the fashions of the early 19th century.  The fashions of the 1750s, 1850s and 1950s placed the emphasis on the full skirt, whether through use of the crinoline or several petticoats.  However, I think that cycle has come to an end, as clothes now owe little to style, and more to functionality.  People mostly dress for comfort now, and fashion seems to have come to a standstill as a result.


    http://s1.hubimg.com/u/5361240_f248.jpg
    1850s


    http://s4.hubimg.com/u/5361243.jpg
    1750s


    http://s3.hubimg.com/u/5361250.jpg
    1950s

    1. Richieb799 profile image80
      Richieb799posted 7 years ago

      It does repeat but its simply because the fashion industry has no original concepts so it has to keep recycling but I like it when the hipster look comes back around and women dress retro smile

    2. calpol25 profile image65
      calpol25posted 7 years ago

      I have noticed recently that the 1970s fashion seems to have come full circular, I guess people just prefer the older looks but with a more modern feel smile

      1. Hui (蕙) profile image80
        Hui (蕙)posted 7 years agoin reply to this

        Right, this must be the concept of "spiral rising", i.e. put innovative ideas into old designs. Besides, it is a good way for designers to turn to old times for creation, like Richieb799 said above "no original concepts". And plus, people nowadays seem to be fond of remembering past times in this hurry society. Indeed, all those old memories are memorable and meaningful.smile

    3. profile image0
      Sherlock221bposted 7 years ago

      http://s1.hubimg.com/u/5361308_f248.jpg
      1811


      http://s1.hubimg.com/u/5361312.jpg
      1911

      1. calpol25 profile image65
        calpol25posted 7 years agoin reply to this

        Oddly enough walking passed Dorothy Perkins window the other day I could swear these two dresses were in it, though it could have been H&M......smile

    4. profile image49
      lisacruise82posted 6 years ago

      I like to old fashion,It's such a good think.

    5. ixbag profile image58
      ixbagposted 6 years ago

      The 70’s style is the main driver for the popular accessories this season, from bucket bag, Fedora Bag to Chalaza Oxford shoe. In a word, there are few Studio 54’s dazzling, but more Yves Saint Laurent Rive Gauche style.
         Although for 2011-2012 fall and winter, designers’ retro feel inspiration comes from different fashion time, 70’s is still key to the influence and to some extent promotes accessory’s developing trend. While modernistic style in the 60’s and elegant mixed style in the 30’s and 40’s provides many fresh ideas. The more remote historical style like Baroque, Rococo and such romantic style add certain fashionable thespian feel elements and luxuriant charm to the accessories.

     
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