jump to last post 1-3 of 3 discussions (6 posts)

How are businesses that offer WiFi being charged in proportion to the way indivi

  1. Billie Kelpin profile image86
    Billie Kelpinposted 3 years ago

    How are businesses that offer WiFi being charged in proportion to the way individuals are charged?

    It seems to me that if businesses were charged at the same proportional rate that individual consumers are charged for Wi-Fi as per gb used per month, they would be out of business!  Both my husband and I need to use about 20 gb for our work each month. (He works as a software engineer remotely and I will be scoring State essays which require a non-public network.)   So I'm thinking about Panera's and Starbucks who have thousands of people working off their Wi-Fi, using tons of gb. Does that mean that consumers are paying a disproportional amount for individual services? Our charges are huge!

    https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/12343189_f260.jpg

  2. carman58 profile image78
    carman58posted 3 years ago

    Guess it depends which side of the pond you live ? I get unlimited internet at home on my contract and can get unlimited 4g on a payg sim card for £15pm .I would only use the likes of Starbucks WiFi if my mobile signal was extremely bad

    1. Billie Kelpin profile image86
      Billie Kelpinposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      We're paying over $150, I believe, just for our hot spot.  However that's for 20 g.  (PS where is the pound sign you used on the keyboard?  Is it "control something" on our keyboard?)

    2. carman58 profile image78
      carman58posted 3 years agoin reply to this

      UK keyboard has £ sign as default, also $ & € using shift key. My home internet including cable TV, Landline & unlimited fibre optic data £47pm so roughly $70 !

  3. skear profile image95
    skearposted 3 years ago

    Business internet services are typically unlimited so they can offer free wifi to customers without incurring overage charges on data usage.

    Essentially they are connecting wireless access points to a hard wired (unlimited) internet connection.

    Many residential internet providers also offer unlimited plans such as Time Warner, or Google Fiber.

    Mobile data is a different story though, most carriers impose data usage restrictions.

    1. Billie Kelpin profile image86
      Billie Kelpinposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Sam,  Would you explain a little more? Do you have a hub on this?  We live in an RV park with poor WiFi.  We have a "hotspot" formerly from Verizon, now from Sprint, but 20 gb useage + are very costly.  I don't think we can get Time Warner or GF here

 
working