What would happen if bees went extinct?

  1. ptosis profile image72
    ptosisposted 18 months ago

    What would happen if bees went extinct?

    Of 100 crop species that provide 90% of our global food supply, 71 are bee-pollinated. Should we genetically modify the bees to make them immune to the pesticides?  Millions of bees were found dead after GMO corn was planted just a few weeks ago in Ontario, Canada, likely due to pesticides known as neonicotinoids. Dominance of GMO crops has led to the widespread use of pesticides such as neonicotinoids

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  2. Johnny James A profile image78
    Johnny James Aposted 18 months ago

    I believe scientists have already done worst case scenarios if the honey bees died off.  Scientists have looked to whether other animals could take their place.  They first looked to other types of bees, and also into butterflies, beetles, moths, dragonflies, etc.  This problem with other times of insects are that they requires more specialized habitats and so surrounding areas would have to be maintained for them to pollinate at the level of honey bees.  Even with other types of bees the cost may be similar or cost prohibitive. Already, with the death of many bees farmers are paying people to drive hives to their farms to pollinate their crops for so much per hive. The use of other less efficient insects who might wreak havoc to other crops may make food a lot more scare and more expenses. One could try to modify bee strains but would have to monitor small testlets first to see if the modified be is as efficient as the old bees, or would cause more issues by being overly aggressive like some species.  The easier solution might be to come up with modifications to food, or changing the chemical formulas of pesticides.

    1. ptosis profile image72
      ptosisposted 18 months agoin reply to this

      Tried other pollinators: Africanized honey bees accidentally introduced in Brazil 1957 & European Gypsy Moth accidentally introduced in Boston 1868.  Neither did not turn out well. sad

 
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