ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel
  • »
  • Travel and Places»
  • Visiting Asia»
  • Southern Asia

Going to Poona - Part One: Shivaji Nagar

Updated on September 12, 2013

Chappals

One morning, when I'd had my breakfast, Mummy told me that we were going somewhere special for the day and that I had to wear my special clothes for going somewhere nice.

I was in my khaki shorts and the yellow and white striped top that I liked, and of course, my chappals, because if the scorpions. Krishna had laid out my grey shorts and the yellow and white top, ready for me when he woke me, as usual. But we were going somewhere special and I had to change.

So I went back into my bedroom and there, on my chair, were my grey shirt and shorts; all new and clean looking. Krishna and Mummy had laid out my clothes and I thought that he was waiting on the other side of the door; ready to help Chota Sahib if he needed him, but this Chota Sahib dressed himself properly. When I had dressed myself, I went out to look for him, to show him how I looked in the grey shorts and shirt, but I couldn’t find him.


Chapplis

Usually, at this time, I would have heard Krishna in the dining room clearing the breakfast dishes. But he wasn’t there. But there was another noise, a “Squeak Squeak” noise that I didn’t recognise. I went out onto the verandah and Krishna was standing at the bottom of the steps in the sunshine. It was getting hot already, but the “Squeak Squeak” noise was coming from him. He was polishing my black chapplis; my special new black chapplis for special occasions,

I looked down at my brown chappals that I was wearing; Krishna looked down at my brown chappals that I was wearing; my comfy brown chappals.

“These for today, Chota Sahib” said Krishna and he held out the black chapplis. I looked at him, deep into his eyes. He knew what I was thinking; those new black chapplis were hard, and would hurt my feet.

He just held them out; a little bit further. I knew I had to wear them. I sat on the top step and he squatted down in front of me and put them on for me and tightened the strap; just enough. He knew how much.

Mummy came to the door of her bedroom and asked if I wanted any help, but I said “No, Krishna’s doing it”.

Krishna went into the bungalow and it was so quiet.

And then I was ready. Then when I was really ready and looked nice, I called Krishna to come and inspect me.

Krishna came and smiled and told me I looked like a real Sahib. I waited on the veranda while we waited for Daddy and Mummy to come.

We left the bungalow, and as I did, I turned and said, “Goodbye" to Krishna, but Mummy said he was coming with us for a little way and then coming back home. I liked that.

We left the compound and turned right as we came out of the gate. We walked a little way towards the cinema. When we got to the area near the cinema, there was a big open space between the side of the cinema and the swimming pool buildings; a place where there were tongas and tonga wallahs. I loved travelling in a tonga. It was a strange and very old fashioned vehicle to my mind; even the mind of a young boy. The completely black trappings, the canopy, the wheels and often as not, in my minds eye, the horse was black.

Tonga or Tanga


We found a tonga wallah and Daddy negotiated a price and then we boarded. I thought that Krishna would go home then, but I was so happy, because he told me he was coming to the railway station with me. My parents sat inside and I sat at the back with Krishna; our backs towards the horse and looking back at the road we had driven along. Sitting on the hard black cushion; our legs hanging over the back and holding on to the iron rail so that we didn’t fall off. Krishna made sure that I was safe. I could see the people on the road getting smaller and smaller and then the road to our bungalow was so far away I couldn’t see it anymore. I couldn’t even see the big tamarind tree on the corner. A couple of young Indian boys made a half-hearted attempt to run along behind us, but Krishna waved his hands at them and they veered off and walked back towards the tamarind tree, whistling and laughing loudly.

The tonga took us all the way to the railway station for Dehu Road Cantonment. We got out of the tonga and then I waved Goodbye to Krishna; a real Goodbye this time and he stood and watched as we went through the big doors to where the platform was.

But when we got into the railway station, Mummy suddenly realised that she wasn’t very well at all. She said that she still wanted to go to Poona, but that she might feel better when we got inside the train. We were waiting on the platform, but then Mummy said, in a very little and quick voice, that she needed to “go”.

Daddy walked up to an Indian lady; spoke to her briefly and quietly and he put some money in her hand… I think it was one Anna, but I’m not sure.

The Indian lady then went and stood against the white painted fence; waiting. It was near a bench and Daddy told a man and a lady who were sitting there to go away and then the Indian lady held her sari up so that Mummy could hide herself behind it, because she had a very upset tummy and she didn’t want anybody to see what she was doing. She needed to go to the lavatory, but she couldn’t go into the real lavatory at the station because it was very dirty.

The Indian lady held her sari up on either side, like a big, bright red butterfly’s wings. Mummy squatted down behind it and then she was better and the train came along and we boarded it.

Mummy smiled a funny smile, and said that she was feeling all right, but her face was very white.

When we were in the train, I was sitting on the left hand side, with Daddy; facing the way the train was going; our faces towards the engine. We were looking out of the carriage window as we were travelling along. We went past a little village which was right close to the railway lines. The train was travelling quite slowly. The train was very high up, and we looked down and could see little houses; little huts and there were people living in them and I could see children running and playing and a lady cooking on a little fire outside her home.

There was a cow, just standing there, doing nothing, and some goats, just like the goats at the back of our bungalow. Our sweeper lived at the back of the compound, with his wife and their children and Daddy said that they could keep goats there so long as they didn’t come into the house or eat the Mali’s flowers.

Daddy pointed to the village we were passing, and he told me that the people who lived there spread cow poo on the walls and the floors of their houses.

“Doesn’t it smell?” I asked,

“No! When the cow poo gets dry it gets very hard and the floor gets as hard as the floor of our bathroom in the bungalow”.

Daddy said that the Indian people in that village used dry cow poo to burn on their fires and did their cooking with it. He said that if they had realised they could put it on their gardens and it would make things grow better.

But everything seemed to be growing properly anyway, so I didn’t know why they needed to. But I didn’t like the idea of eating food that had been cooked on a fire made from dried cow poo.

Shiva on Nandi

“Do you know what the name of that village is?” Daddy asked me.

I did know, because Daddy had told me before but he liked to tell me so I said,

“No! Daddy”

“It’s called Shivaji Nagar”, he said.

And I said, “Yes!” because I knew what it was called.

Then he said, “Do you know why it’s called that?”

And I said, “Yes”.

“Then; you tell me”, said Daddy, and I wonder why he smiled that way.

“Shivaji Nagar means: This is where Shiva fought because this is where the god Shiva had a battle and he won; and you could tell he was a god because he had a blue face”,

And then Daddy said, “Yes!” because I was right

And then he said

“Always remember this is where Shiva fought. And what’s the name of this village?”

“Shivaji Nagar” I said in a big voice, and it sounded to me just the way Krishna said it.

“You said it really nicely”, said Daddy and he smiled and looked out of the window.

A Glossary of Words used in this three part Story


Sahib:Used formerly as a form of respectful address for a European man in British India

Chota: little

Chota Sahib: Little Sir. Term of respect for a small boy

Memsahib: A married white or upper-class woman. Respectful form of address

Chapplis: Form of sandal with two broad leather straps: left to right and right to left meeting at the heel of the foot with a buckle. Leather sole.

Chappals: Open type of outdoor footwear, consisting of a flat sole held loosely on the foot by a Y-shaped strap, like a thin thong, that passes between the first (big) and second toes and around either side of the foot.

Degchi: A deep round saucepan traditionally made of brass or copper, but stainless steel is also available.

Tonga (Tanga) A light horse-drawn carriage used for transportation in India and Pakistan

Khansama: Cook

Bearer: Man in charge of the running of the household; under Memsahib, or Sahib. Also given the responsibility of caring for a male British child.

Mali: Gardener

Poona: (Present day Pune) The eighth largest metropolis in India, the second largest in the state of Maharashtra after Bombay (present day Mumbai).

Nandi in Maharashtra

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • Twilight Lawns profile image
      Author

      Twilight Lawns 15 months ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K.

      Ah! Hub Pages... What a load of rubbish They didn't notify me.

      x

    • profile image

      Surabhi Kaura 15 months ago

      Well. How can anyone forget Diwali, my Dear (smiles).

    • profile image

      Surabhi Kaura 15 months ago

      Yes, yes. I have commented on it.

    • Twilight Lawns profile image
      Author

      Twilight Lawns 15 months ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K.

      I have yet to write anything about Krishna apart from a little piece entitle (if I remember it correctly) 'Shiva in the morning.'

      Have you managed to read the final episode of 'Going to Poona'?

      I think that you may like it... it always brings me happy memories round about the end of September beginning of October (Does that give you hint?)

    • profile image

      Surabhi Kaura 15 months ago

      My goodness. Thanks for sharing your experience, Ian. I am curious to know about Krishna. Do you have written any article on him? Thanks for mentioning about the book. I'll get a copy of it. See you soon, my Sweet Friend.

    • Twilight Lawns profile image
      Author

      Twilight Lawns 15 months ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K.

      Surabhi, my friend, I am so glad you took the time to read this one.

      In relation to Krishna (my Krishna), I have yet to write about him and about the last time I saw him. Enough to say that, many, many years later, I was being interviewed by an author friend of mine. She was preparing to write a book concerning the 7/7 Bombings in London and the mindsets of the Islamic youth in this country. She had already decided to devote a whole chapter to me and so I was really excited to be interviewed in relation to it.

      However, when it came to me recounting my relationship with Krishna and the last days that I saw him, she had to turn off the recorder, because I became so distressed. I have never been able to write about it to this day, and even to start to tell anybody about the circumstances makes me well up.

      My friend, you may be interested to learn, is Hanifa Deen; she writes and lectures on Islamic and Women’s Issues in Australia. She is highly respected there and abroad for her opinions, her writing and her standing in the community. I can highly recommend all of her books, but think that if you were to read ‘Broken Bangles’, especially you would love her prose.

    • profile image

      Surabhi Kaura 15 months ago

      Ian,

      I love your way of conversing through the ink of pen. It’s as if I am sitting with my Mummy and Papa, and having a riot of conversation; and giggles; and laugher. By the way, I am really cherishing your writes. It reminds me of my own old days. I, too, had one “Krishna” (smile). The only difference is that she was a female. She was our housemaid, but we always treated her as a family member. So she was a part of our family. She took a good care of me during my childhood. I was deeply attached to her. I can still vividly remember those tears rolling down her cheeks when she said “ta ta” to me. It was the time when we were leaving from India to Canada. Unforgettable memories.

      How I loved your story here! Don’t you miss your Krishna? I am sure you do. Your hub took me back to my old days, and I really miss those days. The historic touch in your hub is so sweet, and especially the conversation with your Daddy. Oh! Those chappals... they were... o boy! My Pita ji (Granndpa) was really fond of his chappals. It made me smile :)

    • Twilight Lawns profile image
      Author

      Twilight Lawns 5 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K.

      Storytellersrus. please bear with me and read the rest in this series. I am glad (or I am assuming)thatyou are enjoying what you have read already, but there's more to come. Chapter after chapter.

    • Storytellersrus profile image

      Barbara 5 years ago from Stepping past clutter

      twilight lawns

      is this to imply that twilight lawns reflect silver light

      i voted this up and interesting. i felt like a child as i read it. you remember well.

    • Twilight Lawns profile image
      Author

      Twilight Lawns 6 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K.

      Linda, have you read chapter three yet? Or as I am tempted to write, in case my punctuation is dodgy:

      Lindahaveyoureadchapterthreeyet

      Missed you too. Take care.

      x

    • Twilight Lawns profile image
      Author

      Twilight Lawns 6 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K.

      Yes, Svetlana, I sometimes get notification and sometimes, I don't. HP is changing in little bits all the time and i find it hard to deal with what I get.

      I know that both you and Nellieanna have posted and commented, but maybe they think we are the three disruptive Musketeers and they don;t let us know unless we get more and more silly. I am capable of doing that... you and Nellie are more sensible. In fact, much more sensibler!

    • Lady Wordsmith profile image

      Linda Rawlinson 6 years ago from Lancaster, UK

      Just sorry I can't manage to stay for very long at the moment. I'd love to sit a while, and have a good natter, but alas, I've only minutes to spare just at the moment. Happily, this stinginess with my time is not permanent, and once I've submitted my next proofreading assignment, I'll be able to hang out with you some more :)

      I'm pleased to hear you say that Ian, that you've been looking forward to my visit. I've missed you, dear friend.

      Linda.

    • kallini2010 profile image

      kallini2010 6 years ago from Toronto, Canada

      Ian, I missed your reply - sometimes there is no notification.

      Well, all I can say - I don't like tributes, especially to me. They are often insincere, "a cliche sitting on a cliche" (the death of writing and public speaking) and especially I hate when somebody says "Svetlana is such and such and such...". They don't know and it does not make me happy.

      The reason my tribute takes me so long is my idea is different - I called it "a tribute" because it is dedicated to my readers and it is about my readers, but I try... From one point it veered in twelve different directions and since it is not happening, I thought I should not push it - let it sit and rest and unfold on its own. Then when I will be happy with it, then chances are I will achieve the desired effect.

      I am not only "target audience", I am also "quality control group."

      Take care,

    • Twilight Lawns profile image
      Author

      Twilight Lawns 6 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K.

      Linda, I just wrote you a long reply and lost the lot.

      Again. (But more brief)

      I hope you enjoy the third chapter as much as the first two.

      You have no idea how much I have been looking forward to your visit.

      x

    • Lady Wordsmith profile image

      Linda Rawlinson 6 years ago from Lancaster, UK

      Alas, I did not make it to the end of the final chapter of this hub, because I nodded off. Now, I must STRESS, that this is not because of your writing, because the story was beautiful and I am dying to experience diwali for myself, but I am so, so tired because I am a hard working little mummy at present. So I have properly bookmarked your excellent third chapter and I am going to return to it tomorrow, after some sleep, when I can give it my proper and fullest attention, such as wot it deserves.

      That Lynne Truss, eh? Well, I favour an Oxford comma myself :) And don't even get me started on em rules and en rules (no, really, don't, because I don't have the foggiest clue what they're for!)

      Nope, not a jot of obsequiousness here: I meant every word :) Your writing inspires me, truly.

      Linda.

    • Twilight Lawns profile image
      Author

      Twilight Lawns 6 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K.

      I have been standing here with my arms folded and my foot, tap, tap, tapping, Linda, wondering where the hell you go to.

      Blame Lynne Truss for the plethora of semicolons instead of commas... but please forgive me. I beg you. I was educated in Australia, and we do love punctuation... especially the Oxford Comma.

      Thanks for your very kind remakes, my friend. I know there is no sycophancy there.

      Ian

    • Lady Wordsmith profile image

      Linda Rawlinson 6 years ago from Lancaster, UK

      I'm here, at last! I know, I'm so late, but I've been ever so busy. Sorry my friend.

      Yes, I do have views, very strong ones! You must get all of this wonderful stuff writ down, because it is among my very favourite things to read, and you have not disappointed at all with this hub. I'm trying to write a very quick comment here, because I want to get on and read the next two chapters which I notice have already been published (my god, I'm so late!)

      This is beautiful. This is the same story that you mentioned that you wanted to write from the child's point of view? Well, it works, and it works beautifully, and you have executed it skillfully. I can tell it's the work of a few days, and I mean that in a very good way. It reads like an excerpt from a proper published book, honestly (though I notice you favour a semi-colon where a comma might do ;) ). You pour your heart and soul into these stories, don't you? It shows.

      I'll pop along to the next one, forthwith :)

      Linda.

      Xx.

    • Twilight Lawns profile image
      Author

      Twilight Lawns 6 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K.

      This small section of the 'History that is Me' was written through the eyes of a child, as that is as I remembered the incidents. There is an innocence in what I saw and held in my mind, but the next section may pull away from a child's perspective because of the situation that was building up around us.

      Good luck with your "tribute". Tributes can be a loaded dice, a loose cannon.

      I remember that when I left school on retirement, one of the teachers got her children to write about me and being in my class and what it was like "now that Mr Clark" is no longer in the school.

      However, the silly bitch (and I mean silly bitch) either forgot to edit the writings or deliberately let stuff pass that should not have been for public consumption, but the resulting work... which the children read aloud at the final assembly were "cringe making", embarrassing for many people, me included, and at times thoroughly offensive.

      I have seldom seen so many squirming people or so many red faces.

    • kallini2010 profile image

      kallini2010 6 years ago from Toronto, Canada

      The way I see it, Ian, is not the way you see it, even though you put the words and I read the same exact words.

      For you it is just a tiny fragment of so much more, for me it is decoding as much as I can imagine.

      The first part made me remember Alma-Ata (literal translation: Father of Apples)/(Kazakhstan) where I used to spend summers with my grandparents.

      The second part brought me to Samarkand - I keep forgetting I was ever there unless something triggers my memory.

      Your writing awakens something in me...

      But what I noticed that this story appears to be written by a child, from a child's view...

      I cannot do that - I edit my memories - I look at my memories as an adult.

      Today I was reading my "insane chronicle" from three years ago - it was not the way I remembered it - but because it was documented - I know it was true and, boy, was it painful.

      If it is therapy... then you may as well document your horrors - face your pains and fears.

      I am going to write a tribute to my readers marking my six months on HP - it will be about my readers, but it might feel disquieting or uncomfortable because the idea is slightly strange. But I think it is worth writing...

      The title will probably be "Let me introduce you to a wonderful person..."

      When, though, I don't know yet.

    • Twilight Lawns profile image
      Author

      Twilight Lawns 6 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K.

      It is almost a form of therapy, Svetlana. I feel as if I am that little boy again... my memories of smells and people and colours and incidents have always been very strong, so I may as well be there... with some of the horrors which surrounded us as well.

    • kallini2010 profile image

      kallini2010 6 years ago from Toronto, Canada

      I kept thinking back to my childhood - I know I did not grow up in India and I have never been to India - I wish I could travel

      your writing provokes the feeling of intimacy - it makes me feel like a child and it is the most delightful aspect of your writing.

      I hope you enjoyed writing it.

    • Nikkij504gurl profile image

      Nikki Wicked 6 years ago from Louisiana

      no not disappointed lol

    • Twilight Lawns profile image
      Author

      Twilight Lawns 6 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K.

      Thank you for reading, anyway. Sorry if you were disappointed.

    • Nikkij504gurl profile image

      Nikki Wicked 6 years ago from Louisiana

      Aww I was expecting more of the story after the definitions, but it was a cute little story, reminiscing of childhood memories. guess I will go to part 2 now!

    • Shalini Kagal profile image

      Shalini Kagal 6 years ago from India

      Hi TL - I wish you could come and see the city as it is now. Very steel, concrete and glass but suddenly, you might see a tonga or a turban to remind you of life as it was :)

    • Twilight Lawns profile image
      Author

      Twilight Lawns 6 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K.

      Enjoy it, Nellie. You have no idea how a poetess, as yourself, would have enjoyed the beauty of the place.

      My mother, I know, would have revelled in the company of one such as you. there were so many Memsahibs who complained all the time about servants, and the "natives" and and and.

    • Nellieanna profile image

      Nellieanna Hay 6 years ago from TEXAS

      Dear Ian - it's my pleasure to read your gripping, well-written, engaging memories of your life as a youngster in India. Its authenticity and personal 'heart' make it purely pleasant to read. I'm on my way to continue the saga. . . Hugs.

    • Twilight Lawns profile image
      Author

      Twilight Lawns 6 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K.

      I hope you won't be disappointed, Keith, when you reach the destination,

      Thank you, Traveller.

    • Twilight Lawns profile image
      Author

      Twilight Lawns 6 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K.

      Thank you, Nellie. Yes, I think Krishna has touched a few hearts already. I was reading your comment, and it was so beautifully put, and then I came to "with his dark, gentle eyes and his solicitous care for his Chota Sahib he loved so dearly." and tears sprang to my eyes, and I am afraid they are still coursing down my face.

      Thank you, Nellie, for your understanding, your friendship and your support.

    • Twilight Lawns profile image
      Author

      Twilight Lawns 6 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K.

      Nidhi, I was born in India. I am an Anglo Indian, I was born in Baluchistan, which is in present-day Pakistan.

      So, if you want to, you could call me an Anglo Indian, or an Anglo Pakistani, or an Anglo Baluchi.

      My father used to say, "Don;t forget; you are a Baluch, my boy".

      And thank you for saying that it was well written.

      And yes, I love India and Indian culture.

    • attemptedhumour profile image

      attemptedhumour 6 years ago from Australia

      Well, the story has been nicely set up. We're chugging along in the warm sunshine, on this oriental journey, wondering where we are going. So let's find out.

    • Nellieanna profile image

      Nellieanna Hay 6 years ago from TEXAS

      Oh, my, Ian! This was magical, like the way I remember my illustrated "Arabian Nights" book made me feel when I was little - transported from the ordinary into another, and a beautiful, realm. Krishna - I've felt like I know him from other of your stories, with his dark, gentle eyes and his solicitous care for his Chota Sahib he loved so dearly.

      I can hardly wait to continue reading the story! It's almost 3AM now, so I'll save it for the morrow. It will be my 4th of July treat! Hugs. (I voted every category, even funny, because there's a merriment in it, though not raucous humor.)

    • nidhi.singh profile image

      Nidhi Singh 6 years ago from Austin

      have you ever been to india? do you have an interest in indian culture?

      BTW well written :)

    • Twilight Lawns profile image
      Author

      Twilight Lawns 6 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K.

      Augustine you are so very kind. I have just this minute published the second part. Thank you for your wonderfully kind words.

    • A.A. Zavala profile image

      Augustine A Zavala 6 years ago from Texas

      Finally, a real look into the lives of Indian society. Or at least into the life of one. Beats watching "City of Joy" with Patrick Swayze. Awesome!

    • Twilight Lawns profile image
      Author

      Twilight Lawns 6 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K.

      You will not be disappointed, Becky. He really is very clever... talented.

    • Twilight Lawns profile image
      Author

      Twilight Lawns 6 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K.

      I really laughed out loud when I read your comment concerning feeding the errant Norfolk Man with tulip corms. I must point him in the direction of that comment, Mck.

      Don;t worry about the final chapter, Mck. Lady Wordsmith has views on that as well.

      And thank you so very, very much for your support. I really do appreciate your time spend here.

    • profile image

      Becky 6 years ago

      Thank you for introducing me to Sunnie and Mark. I already read Sunnie's and will check out Mark's.

    • mckbirdbks profile image

      mckbirdbks 6 years ago from Emerald Wells, Just off the crossroads,Texas

      You managed to portray a bit of a regal, privileged life lead amongst a background of poverty. Your parents took great care to teach you, protect you and build a sense of a secure world. And you still grew up and feed Steve tulip corms.

      I personally would not tell readers, that there is a last chapter but it is just so sad that I ‘m not going to write it.

    • Twilight Lawns profile image
      Author

      Twilight Lawns 6 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K.

      There is an incident in the next part, Mark, that has haunted me for over sixty years. All will be revealed.

      And the "final chapter", if there is one, I feel will never be written, because it makes me cry... and believe it or not, I am right now; just thinking about it,

      Big softy (You, of course... I'm as hard as nails)

      Yeah! Right!

    • Twilight Lawns profile image
      Author

      Twilight Lawns 6 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K.

      Becky, there are parts in the Sub Continent where people have not moved on at all, and would like the British back.

      I have strong and abiding memories and much love for that period in history and consider myself lucky to have been part of it... but there were many heartbreaking incidents and happenings that could have been avoided. Please read the next two parts if you get a chance.

      And thank you for coming and reading my stuff.

    • Twilight Lawns profile image
      Author

      Twilight Lawns 6 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K.

      I laughed out loud, Sunnie, when I read the "boiled eggs" in the car bit.

      Yes, you know me well.

      I have a new follower, here, and I would like both you and Mark to meet her...

      Becky! meet Sunnie and Mark.

      Mark and Sunnie! meet Becky.

      (Becky, read their writings... they are alike as chalk and cheese, but both very, very worth reading).

    • Mark Ewbie profile image

      Mark Ewbie 6 years ago from Euroland

      Awesome. I don't suppose you care for that word, but I don't what it would be in the 'right' language. I'm going to cry I know it, but I will read on.

    • profile image

      Becky 6 years ago

      Fascinating look at another lifestyle. This lifestyle is no more, I believe.

    • profile image

      Sunnie Day 6 years ago

      Have a wonderful nights sleep..I know how you are when you get writing my scribble scibble scibble buddy..take care and I can not wait until I read the other hubs..I can picture you sitting in your car, eating your boiled eggs, and scribbling away..

      Hugs..night night

    • Twilight Lawns profile image
      Author

      Twilight Lawns 6 years ago from Norbury-sur-Mer, Surrey, England. U.K.

      Mwah! Thank you. I have just posted it and am exhausted. I have been writing it for about a week. but it has been going around in my head for years.

      There's a really sad bit coming up, my dear friend, but as it is all true. I can't apologise or leave it out, because it is part of my own personal history.

      Glad you are liking it.

      Thanks for marking me up.

      It's half past three in the morning, and I am going to bed in a minute. The other two parts will be published tomorrow, Insh'Allah.

    • profile image

      Sunnie Day 6 years ago

      Oh Ian this was such a fabulous story and I loved learning all about the culture. What a fascinating life you lived..truly a gift..thank you for sharing..I have been waiting and waiting for you to post..miss you!

      Up, Awesome, beautiful and Useful...all the way..

      Big Hugs,

      Sunnie