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jump to last post 1-11 of 11 discussions (13 posts)

How can I work and live abroad with a family?

  1. followthestray profile image90
    followthestrayposted 4 years ago

    How can I work and live abroad with a family?

    I have two young boys, under the age of 2.  My husband and I have both been looking for more fulfilling jobs in the states.  Then as a joke I suggested we move abroad and work elsewhere, since I have two friends that actually did that and were very successful.  The joke turned into a real thought, but we don't really know how to go about it, since most abroad programs are for students or singles.  If we were really to move our family abroad how would you suggest us going about it?  I'm particularly interested in hearing from families that have done it.

  2. Jlbowden profile image90
    Jlbowdenposted 4 years ago

    Very good question.  I do not know anyone who actually does this, but I have heard of couples, who purchased a summer home, in Vienna, for example, or Thailand. 

    These individuals either had careers as teachers, or worked in hospitals abroad, in some capacity, such as a traveling nurse for example.  Often they would spend six months of the year there, in the foreign country and 6 mo. In the states.

    Depending on your job status, or if you are in the process of a career change this is possible.  I've also heard of one individual, who had actually purchased some Real Estate in France and would fly there a few months of the year, to send time there. 

    This is all very feasible, as well as very possible to accomplish with a little thought and a working plan. Hope my suggestions help you out a bit.

  3. ameliam.michelle1 profile image76
    ameliam.michelle1posted 4 years ago

    Agreeing with Jlbowden, one of my friends is living in Kenya as a humanitarian volunteer and she seems quite happy with that, every now and then she is flying to some other country. She always says that as long as you are able to adjust to the culture, migration poses no problem. You can secure a work visa and work there or as you told that you might be working outside your native country, therefore, it is better if you go through the websites . Think this link will help you in this. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/ex … ldren.html

  4. ALUR profile image65
    ALURposted 4 years ago

    It depends on your future goals...many I know have in their contracts allotted times for their vacations to be split as well as some eventually move family with them. It's not easy & separation is wrenching but I hope a good passage awaits u

  5. dignifiedlove profile image89
    dignifiedloveposted 4 years ago

    You should visit Oneika the Traveller's blog.  Just type into google "Oneika the Traveller."  The blog is about a young woman who is traveling around the world, and has consequently lived abroad.  Not too long ago, I was reading how other people wanted to know how she is able to live abroad and travel so much.

      As a result, she wrote jobs that people could do if they wanted to travel the world. Here is the link: http://www.oneika-the-traveller.com/how … avel.html.  I know she has an article about other jobs people can do abroad.  I was not able to find that article.

    Lastly, there are plenty of ways to make money and live abroad.  Especially if you have a computer and the internet.  Do you have skills that could be used as a freelancer?  There are sites like freelancer.com, elancer.com, odesk.com, and peopleperhour.com where people make a living doing freelancer work.  For instance, if you know how to write well, proofread, make websites, graphics, transcribe, etc.  The possibilities are endless. 

    You could even start a blog or niche site.  A niche site will require the use of keyword research skills.   If you have a valuable skill or knowledge, you could create a product or website around it.  What is more, you could offer this skill on freelancer sites. 

    We all have something we do well, it is just the matter of using our resources.  Hope I was helpful.  Have a nice day.

    1. ameliam.michelle1 profile image76
      ameliam.michelle1posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Yes, it is quite true, possibilities are endless, nonetheless, I think you need to have certain goals too. Planning as always is the most important ingredient. Just keep your priorities set in front of you and devise strategies accordingly.

  6. Globetrekkermel profile image76
    Globetrekkermelposted 4 years ago

    I believe that is feasible even with a family of young children. I have read a lot of overseas travel job seekers and have found themselves jobs overseas and love it. I tried to post some links but hubpages does not allow posting links .google these words : finding overseas jobs with family. lots of resources available.
    Hope this helps.Good luck.

  7. Silver Fish profile image84
    Silver Fishposted 4 years ago

    I live in the UK and it is very common for families  evn with young children to emigrate and relocate abroad. Many UK citizens relocate to Canada, Australia, South Africa, elsewhere in Europe, Dubai, New Zealand.

    Many countries are desperate for skilled workers and offer attractive relocation packages.

    It is so widespread in the UK that most people have close family members or friends who have relocated abroad.

  8. profile image0
    LeighMCposted 4 years ago

    Hello.
    I don't have children, but I certainly know people who have moved abroad with children.
    The best way to do it would be to first find work abroad. Once you have a job offer, you may find that that company pays for your family to move to their country.
    You would have to do your research into schooling and so on, but these days, most countries have international schools, where expats send their kids, as they learn the American schooling style, and of course it's in English.
    You might find that one of you would need to go to your country of choice, set up interviews and such, and see people in person, in order to get a job.
    It does get more difficult as you get older, to find work abroad (as it does in your own country), but it is not impossible.
    I know that many companies in the Netherlands employ people from the US, as there is a skills shortage here. My husband is an IT manager at a telecommunications company, and he struggles to find people to fill positions. Half the people at his company are not from here!
    If I were you, I would start by browsing all the job sites. You will be surprised at how many jobs ask for people who can speak English. Just apply, apply, apply. You never know!
    I hope I have answered some questions for you?
    Good luck!

  9. lara lar profile image57
    lara larposted 4 years ago

    Don't really agree with the excuse that programs abroad are mainly for students and singles. A lot of families with kids live and work here and also go to college. As long as you are willing to work hard and plan what's best for your family, I think the sky will be your limit.

  10. billericky profile image55
    billerickyposted 4 years ago

    We did it with 4 young children.

    We got fed up in England and decided to move to Spain one day. A month later we were gone with little money.

    I found various jobs for the first year, enough to keep our heads above water. The kids were 1, 6, 8, and 10 years old.

    I became self employed as a fencer after some training and worked hard, with long days in all types of weathers. My missus took up babysitting to help ends meet. Every penny counted.

    It was scary as we had no close family back home for support, but we were determined.

    The kids easily got into school and learnt Spanish relatively easily.

    It was an experience. We were there for 6 years on a whim and it was great. We only returned to the UK because my daughter was losing a kidney and the Spanish would not treat it unless we went into private medical care.

    I would do it again.
    There are opportunities in every country for the right minded people whom are willing to work for it, regardless of age, sex or colour.

    1. ameliam.michelle1 profile image76
      ameliam.michelle1posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Great effort billiericky, migrating to another country with kids and that too without any support is really a momentous thing to pull off. I hope you definitely do it again in the near future.

  11. marieryan profile image84
    marieryanposted 4 years ago

    Yes, you certainly can live and work abroad with a family,  but    " abroad" is a very big place and all places "abroad" are very different! Everything will depend on your line of work, languages you can speak, countries you would be interested in, and a long etcetera.
    Personally, I think the younger the children are, the better, as long as you have no financial difficulties and they are not going to suffer in any way like that. Perhaps your husband would work and you would look after the children as they are not of school age yet. You could re-think your situation once they reach school age. At this point you would have to make a big committment to the language and culture of the 'other country' as the children would be being educated in a different system to that which you had grown up in. Socially, going abroad would be no problem for them.....(try taking a thirteen year-old away from her social group and see how that could cause lots of problems!)

    There are many issues to consider, none of them to be taken lightly. I wish you every success in making this very important life-changing decision.

 
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