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Did the Mayans build a city in Georgia?

  1. CMHypno profile image89
    CMHypnoposted 4 years ago

    An historian is claiming that rock terraces and mounds in Georgia are the remains of a Mayan city?


    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article … tains.html


    What do you think?

    1. Mark Knowles profile image61
      Mark Knowlesposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Not the weirdest idea I have seen lol

      Having said that - it is the Daily Mail. They'll print anything.

      1. CMHypno profile image89
        CMHypnoposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Sometimes truth can be stranger than fiction?  If it's not true, at least it's a fairly harmless belief.

        Have a nice day Mark smile

        1. Mark Knowles profile image61
          Mark Knowlesposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          True enough. You too. big_smile

          1. Alastar Packer profile image83
            Alastar Packerposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            Aha! A forum thread that really raises the BP here, and from my English friend CM at that. Is there any other site like this one in the eastern U.S.? Not that i'm aware of. The Cherokees built nothing like this i'm aware of either. Those are some of the oldest mountains in the world and amazing discoveries are still being made in them exclusive of this gentleman's theory. And if the Cherokees didn't construct them then who did? And yes, where was DeSoto's "Yupaha?" Going to look into the C's legends, if any, on this; and "Bunk", don't think so.

            1. Mark Knowles profile image61
              Mark Knowlesposted 4 years ago in reply to this

              Well - it is not that far, although I think calling them "ruins," is somewhat of a stretch. big_smile

              1. Alastar Packer profile image83
                Alastar Packerposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                May be a poor word choice for them, your right Mark, good point. I can personally attest to the Yucatan and nearby folks ability to make it that far in considerable numbers though, and by any means possible. Might take a good bit longer by foot but where there's a will there's a way lol.big_smile

    2. Druid Dude profile image61
      Druid Dudeposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Not Mayan....one word....Cahokia.

  2. habee profile image89
    habeeposted 4 years ago

    Well, I'l just have to head up to Brasstown Bald and check it out! I didn't notice it last time I was there.

  3. eternals3ptember profile image60
    eternals3ptemberposted 4 years ago

    North America had a Native American population that build mounds across the continent... Some where fairly big, and were not just mounds but rather pyramids and other unique structures.

    If anything like this is found in Georgia my money isn't on the remains of the Mayan culture, but rather local tribes which, I think are rather different from the Mayans.

    If the terrace was created around 900 AD, that places about a century after the rise of the mound-building culture.

    http://s4.hubimg.com/u/6748099_f248.jpg

    If the photo loads correctly, the green triangles are mounds...

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mississippian_culture

    1. habee profile image89
      habeeposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Yep, some of those mounds are pretty impressive, too.

    2. Alastar Packer profile image83
      Alastar Packerposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Fair enough with the mounds eternal, but can you point to one constructed just like the one at Brasstown Bald in eastern Amer.- the mound builders were fairly uniform in their  mound-building, one of the exceptions might be the giant snake in Ohio; but the one in question appears to be one of a kind, especially with the terracing. Enlighten if in error on that.

      1. Druid Dude profile image61
        Druid Dudeposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        The Snake Mound wasn't Native American. It bears more similarities to Neolithic sites in Europe. The post-Clovis points from the east coast support this possibility, or, they could be from a later time, which would indicate a possible Nordic influence. The Kensington Stone, which, in the last few years has been re-examined, could be an indication of Euro-influences in pre-colombian America.

        1. Alastar Packer profile image83
          Alastar Packerposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          You read my mind Druid Dude. The Kensington Stone has been confirmed as genuine, right? There's now no doubt but that Euros were here a very very long time ago and though they try to side-step it y-chromosome and mitrochondrial DNA have all but confirmed that fact too. Kennewick Skull anybody?

  4. Randy Godwin profile image94
    Randy Godwinposted 4 years ago

    Probably the results of the Mississippi Death Cult as they were in this area of the southeast.  I've researched andwritten several hubs on their culture and the magnificent mounds they constructed.  Fascinating culture, but not of Mayan origin in my opinion.  smile

                                         http://s1.hubimg.com/u/6186572.jpg

    1. Alastar Packer profile image83
      Alastar Packerposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      If any one on here is an expert its you Randy. But are any of the other Mississippi dealt cult mounds laid out similar to Brasstowns Balds? Do any of them have terracing like this one?big_smile

      1. Randy Godwin profile image94
        Randy Godwinposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        I haven't had a chance to see the whole layout of the complex yet, Alastar.  Some mounds of the Mississippians were terraced but these were not placed directly on the sides of mountains or hills.  However, they erected many different types of earthworks and fortifications because of their using the indigenous woodland tribes as sacrificial offerings.

        Some of these woodland tribes resented this.  lol  This is why all Mississippian complexes had walls, moats, or other defensive structures around their towns and temple complexes.  They also used the seasonal equinoxes as guides for laying out some of their mounds and temples.

        It will be interesting to see what is found at this site, though.

                 http://s1.hubimg.com/u/6186572.jpg

        1. Alastar Packer profile image83
          Alastar Packerposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          So the possibility remains, however slight, that they could be Mayan, or at least something other than Mississippian. The terracing is unique in it being on the mountain. As you know Randy the great Mayan civilization disappeared almost overnight in archaeological terms, so maybe a group did trek to the north Ga. area. Perhaps with the publicity on it now some serious work will be done and that should prove most interesting whatever is found, your right.smile

          Oh, and speaking of fortifications and such, when i was researching the Tuscarora War in N.C. came on the fact they constructed the most elaborate and complex defensive structures in the colonial era, bar none. Didn't do them any good as their food supplies couldn't out last a protracted siege.

      2. habee profile image89
        habeeposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Randy knows his Eastern NA stuff!

  5. CMHypno profile image89
    CMHypnoposted 4 years ago

    This is fascinating to me, because I never really knew until a few years ago that there had been mounds, earthworks and cities built in the US.

    It will be really exciting to see what does get excavated and how much more is still to be found.

  6. Alastar Packer profile image83
    Alastar Packerposted 4 years ago

    On a side note: the Melungeon mystery has finally been solved by DNA testing. Seems their ancestors weren't ship-wrecked Portuguese or even Native Americans; it was African-American males and indentured European females in the 1600s.

    1. Randy Godwin profile image94
      Randy Godwinposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I've often wondered if pre-Columbian contact with Europeans might not explain some of the native settlements which were depopulated all of a sudden.  Common diseases from the Old World would have decimated the native populations much as early Spanish explorers reported on their first explorations in the eastern part of the US.

                            http://s1.hubimg.com/u/6186572.jpg

      1. habee profile image89
        habeeposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        BTW, RD, have you been to Kolomoki Mounds?

        1. Randy Godwin profile image94
          Randy Godwinposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Not yet, Holle.  I missed going when we went to Eufaula awhile back, but I'm making a special trip there before long.  It's a bit different than other Mississippian complexes. though. It's one of the few complexes in this area I've yet to visit. 

                                                http://s1.hubimg.com/u/6186572.jpg

          1. habee profile image89
            habeeposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            Kolomoki isn't Mississipian - it's Woodland. It's the largest Woodland site in the Southeast. It's really neat! As far as mounds in GA are concerned, the Woodland and Mississippian don't look very different to me. Etowah and Nacoochee look basically like Kolomoki. Of course, I don't know what part erosion has played.

            1. Randy Godwin profile image94
              Randy Godwinposted 4 years ago in reply to this

              There is a bit of controversy as to exactly where Kolomoki fits into the picture.  Some believe it it predates the Mississippian culture because of the Weeden island type pottery found there.  Someone broke into the museum several years ago and made off with lots of valuable artifacts which--as far as I know-- haven't been found yet/  Looking forward to seeing the sit in person.

              Still, Etowah is certainly the largest of the complexes in the southeast and perhaps the best preserved.  It's hard to beat the earth lodge at Ocmulgee for it's original baked clay floor though.  You may have seen the photos of it on some of my hubs about the Ocmulgee complex.  Fascinating!

                                                       http://s1.hubimg.com/u/6186572.jpg

              1. habee profile image89
                habeeposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                Hmm...Kolomoki claims to be the largest and oldest Woodland site in the SE. Johnny and I toured Kolomoki when Mandy went to camp there. I've seen Etowah, too, but it was years ago. I haven't seen Ocmulgee. It's a shame that our state has several sites that are now under reservoirs. What were they thinking??

                I'll check out your hub. I need to write one on Kolomoki - if I can find the photos. lol

                1. Randy Godwin profile image94
                  Randy Godwinposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                  We are way behind on studying these sites in Georgia.  There are still boxes of artifacts sitting in storage at Ocmulgee which were excavated in the 30's and 40's which have never been cataloged or researched.  We spend time and money all over the world but fail to fully research sites in our own states.

                  There is another mound complex a few miles down the river from the Ocmulgee site I want to visit, but one may only go there under supervision by park officials and when the river is low enough to gain access to the site.  It too still lacks proper research.  This site has one of the only two spiral mounds in the US.  It is called the Lamar site and is only one of several other sites not properly researched yet.

                  There is still lots to be learned from these sites if we ever get around to actually excavating them.

                             http://s1.hubimg.com/u/6186572.jpg

                  1. habee profile image89
                    habeeposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                    I've read a little about Lamar. We were talking yesterday with Steve and Sandy about travel in their motor home, and I told them there are still places in GA I haven't seen. They agreed. I think our next day trip might be to Ocmulgee!

      2. Alastar Packer profile image83
        Alastar Packerposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Believe your on to something there for real Randy. A new book out called DNA USA implies for example that the Chippewa have more Euro markers than Native; and the one Cherokee volunteer in the study barely had any Native Amer markers at all. Thanks for that awesome info.smile

        1. Randy Godwin profile image94
          Randy Godwinposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          No telling what modern science will be able to tell us about these cultures one of these days, Alastar!  I've always felt Europeans have visited here much more than we suspected before.

                      http://s1.hubimg.com/u/6186572.jpg

          1. Alastar Packer profile image83
            Alastar Packerposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            With you on that Randy. What would have been the harder trip: Mesolithic humans following the bountiful seals, fish etc along the ice sheet edge which covered near half the N Atlantic and connected to America or coming down from Siberia/Alaska following that shore to the very end tip of S Amer?

            1. Randy Godwin profile image94
              Randy Godwinposted 4 years ago in reply to this

              Perhaps we'll never know exactly HOW the first immigrants arrived here, Alastar.  Some of them, as you suggest, may have followed the huge rafts of seaweed along the northwest coast in small boats to eventually arrive here.

              Now some scientists believe the earliest Americans may have arrived over 40,000 years ago if the Topper site is any indication.  What a wonderful thing it must have been to have discovered an entire continent literally teeming with game and free for the taking!

                                           http://s1.hubimg.com/u/6186572.jpg

              1. habee profile image89
                habeeposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                Nah, they rode over on horses! lol lol

                1. Randy Godwin profile image94
                  Randy Godwinposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                  Naw, they were still eating them then!  I believe they came from France.  yikes

                            http://s1.hubimg.com/u/6186572.jpg

                  1. habee profile image89
                    habeeposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                    lol  Pony cracklins??

 
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