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Empiricism isn't everything

  1. innersmiff profile image79
    innersmiffposted 3 years ago

    It is a statistical fact that more people die in hospitals than they do in amusement parks.

    Why would it be wrong to argue that we need to ban hospitals, or at least, if we are allowing them to exist, install roller-coasters in them to prevent more deaths?

    1. John Holden profile image60
      John Holdenposted 3 years ago in reply to this

      More people die of old age than anything else.

      Ban old age.

  2. Zelkiiro profile image83
    Zelkiiroposted 3 years ago

    If the Bible is to be believed, then God holds the power of death, which would make God the leading cause of death.

    I say we ban God from everywhere.

  3. wilderness profile image96
    wildernessposted 3 years ago

    Because correlation does not indicate causality.

    1. psycheskinner profile image80
      psycheskinnerposted 3 years ago in reply to this

      +1

      Also no one is suggesting banning either.  So deaths occurring does not imply a need to ban.  Everyone has to die somewhere.

  4. innersmiff profile image79
    innersmiffposted 3 years ago

    OK, seems like you get it.

    Proposition 2:
    Australia has a higher minimum wage than the US, and has higher average incomes than the US.

    How would it be wrong to suggest that increasing the minimum wage in the US would increase average incomes?

    1. wilderness profile image96
      wildernessposted 3 years ago in reply to this

      As there is no indication that the higher Aussie minimum wage caused the average income to go up, it would be wrong.

      There could be a hundred alternative explanations, and increasing minimum wage could even be lowering average Aussie wages, with other actions stronger in nature resulting in a net increase.  When correlation and cause seem strongly connected, as in this case, it is even more important not to confuse the two.

 
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