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jump to last post 1-7 of 7 discussions (15 posts)

Do you put boots on your dog during the winter?

  1. Critical Thinker1 profile image59
    Critical Thinker1posted 5 years ago

    Do you put boots on your dog during the winter?

    I have a small cock-a-poo and in snow his paw hair freezes up and the rock salt on sidewalks irritates his paws, but I'm not convinced dog booties is the answer. I haven't found any that make him seem less uncomfortable. Do you have similar problems with your dog in the winter? Do you use dog boots? Or do you have a better solution to this problem. I look forward to hearing your thoughts and ideas.

  2. BraidedZero profile image92
    BraidedZeroposted 5 years ago

    My wife puts little boots/socks on our Corgis whenever they're in the snow or cold. Some dogs just aren't meant for the snow, or used to it. This alternative is better than letting your dog get frostbite on his paws (yes it can really happen). Better safe than sorry.

    1. Critical Thinker1 profile image59
      Critical Thinker1posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks for your response. My dog is definitely not meant for snow! I agree with about the frostbite, I also don't want to risk it. For now, instead of booties just take my dog out for short walks in the cold; he doesn't get far with booties.

    2. BraidedZero profile image92
      BraidedZeroposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      That'll probably be fine. I don't know how it works but I'm sure you can start him off with short walks and he will get use to it.

  3. agilitymach profile image96
    agilitymachposted 5 years ago

    I don't live in a cold enough climate for boots, but several of my friends use boots on their dogs for both hiking and weather.  (I have lots of dog friends all over the world).   The dog has to be taught to accept and even like the boots.  I'd do several short treat training sessions with the boots first to acclimate your pup to the new, odd boots.  If you know how to use a clicker, that would work well for this.  Over time, they do adjust and learn to easily accept them if properly introduced to them, just like a puppy learns to accept the collar and leash. smile

    1. Critical Thinker1 profile image59
      Critical Thinker1posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks for the tips! My dog is easily trainable (balls and attention work better than treats) and the clicker has worked before. I'll try going back to puppy training techniques and dig up the clicker. Hopefully that will help!

  4. Faith A Mullen profile image85
    Faith A Mullenposted 5 years ago

    I have a mini dachshund and a chihuahua, and feel horrible for both when they have to go out in the snow. I've never tried boots, because I just can't imagine it going well. It is just short walks for us in the winter. I have tried shoveling a square in the yard in the past, so that they have an area where they don't have to be walking in snow, but they always end up choosing to explore the snow anyway, so I may care more than they do. I have heard that rock salt is bad for the paws, though, and I definitely wouldn't attempt any prolonged outdoor excursions with my guys in the winter.

    1. Critical Thinker1 profile image59
      Critical Thinker1posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I'm a bit relieved that someone else shovels a spot in the yard for their dog. Mine also jumps right into the snow bank anyway. Rock salt is more irritating; dogs limps when they steps on it. So far short walks and indoor play is best. Thanks!

  5. twig22bend profile image76
    twig22bendposted 5 years ago

    When I lived in Upstate New York there was a tremendous amount of snow in the winter. I had a small and a large dog. After watching them lick their feet for hours after a short walk in the snow I purchased boots for both of them which took them a little time to get comfortable wearing. After some research I learned that the rock salt would be harmful if they continued to ingest it.

    If you look at their feet after coming inside after a snowy day, the snow is frozen between the toes and stuck on their hair. I would take a warm cloth and pull off the ice, because it did not melt that quickly. They do get over the wearing of the boots.

    So yes, boots are a must.

    1. Critical Thinker1 profile image59
      Critical Thinker1posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I didn't think about him ingesting the salt! Yikes. Boots seem like the way to go. Thanks!

    2. DaceyD profile image64
      DaceyDposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      They rock salts also burn their feet, some dogs are more sensitive then others.  One of my dogs (until he started wearing boots) used to dive into the snow because the salt hurt his feet that much.

  6. Grinning Gremlin profile image88
    Grinning Gremlinposted 5 years ago

    I have a fifty pound pit bull who has really sensitive paws. He does fine in fresh snow, but it doesn't take long for his paws to freeze and get cut up by slush and rock salt. And yet he likes nothing so much as being outside and running through the snowbanks.

    We tried dog boot, or shoes, or what have you. He hated them. Would not - actually, more accurately could not - walk in them. Slipped all over whenever he tried to move.

    So, whenever we go for a long walk in the winter, more often than not I end up carrying the big ol' lug for a few minutes at a time until his paws thaw. The looks I get from people when they see me carrying my "big, scary pit bull" like an over-sized baby...priceless.

  7. Critical Thinker1 profile image59
    Critical Thinker1posted 5 years ago

    Today a neighbour said that putting vaseline on his Golden Retriever's paws helped and he recommended it. Has anyone tried that? It doesn't seem like it could hurt if I wiped it off when we got back inside and with the two feet of snow we just got it may be worth a try!

    1. Grinning Gremlin profile image88
      Grinning Gremlinposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Yes! This does indeed work. We tried an expensive jar of something-or-other for our dog's paws, which worked like a dream.

      then we realized that the stuff in the jar was essentially petroleum jelly. So Vaseline would work fine.

    2. Critical Thinker1 profile image59
      Critical Thinker1posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks Grinning Gremlin, I'm glad it works for you! I'm going to try it in the morning.

 
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