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Have you noticed a change in the birds in your yard and neighborhood?

  1. Debby Bruck profile image74
    Debby Bruckposted 5 years ago

    Have you noticed a change in the birds in your yard and neighborhood?

    Since the climate has been changing, are the birds that normally would migrate south staying in your region?

    https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/7672424_f260.jpg

  2. JimTxMiller profile image78
    JimTxMillerposted 5 years ago

    So far migration patterns and habits among bird populations in my area (Wichita Falls, Texas) have not shown significant change. Oh, we may have a few more Canada geese hang around to take up residency, but if this exceptional drought continues, they will move on.

    1. Debby Bruck profile image74
      Debby Bruckposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Dry weather for you in Texas? I find the birds not leaving here in NC. Mild weather.

    2. JimTxMiller profile image78
      JimTxMillerposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Extremely dry and record-setting heat.

  3. Teddletonmr profile image72
    Teddletonmrposted 5 years ago

    Hey Debbie, thanks for asking about the change in the birds migrating where I live. I have not noticed any significant change, my humming bird friends move out with the local farmers harvesting their soybeans, and corn. Ducks and Geese move through on their way south as usual. Buzzards gather, and move on as days shorten and old man winter has his way with things.
    With all the talk about, climate change, weather patterns have cycles. Volcanic activity, the use of fossil fuels, and population of man ever expanding makes us all wonder. What this world is coming too?     
    Make it a great day, teddletonmr

    1. Debby Bruck profile image74
      Debby Bruckposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I wonder, too. Must keep bringing awareness to the public and all generations. Make changes for the benefit of humans and all living beings.

  4. chef-de-jour profile image96
    chef-de-jourposted 5 years ago

    Good question! I love birds. From the humble sparrow to the crazed woodpecker and on into cuckoos and hawks and herons and all of them!
    There are subtle changes occurring within the bird population but no major shifts in behaviour as yet. Being in the UK the most noticable difference in weather patterns for our locality - north England, Yorkshire - is with rainfall. We've had lots of rain and some serious flooding.- mostly in autumn (your fall) which has affected harvests of grain and some veggies. Luckily for the birds this is happening post hatch so there's no harm done.
    If this rainfall /flooding pattern changes and occurs in early spring when birds are nesting and rearing then there will be damage done to numbers and that might become a problem. So far so good.

    We're lucky to have a mild, temperate climate here in the UK. There are no real extremes - compared to countries like yours! - so the outlook for indigenous birds is good in the context of climate change.

    Migrant bird behaviour could change if weather patterns in Europe and Russia are affected.

    Our birds suffer most through:

    loss of habitat via development and intensive farming
    use of chemicals on the land
    indiscriminate killing

    In some respects climate change is the least of their worries because hopefully they'll have time to adapt to whatever Mother Nature throws at them!

    1. Debby Bruck profile image74
      Debby Bruckposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks for complete response. The sensitive birds signal environmental changes from both manmade & natural causes.

  5. tillsontitan profile image86
    tillsontitanposted 5 years ago

    The only thing I've noticed is less winter birds this year.  We always had a nice variety in the winter but this year quite a few are missing. The old standards are here and of course our downy woodpecker but I do miss the others. (upstate NY)

    1. Debby Bruck profile image74
      Debby Bruckposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Mary - Which birds are missing? Maybe they have remained in the areas that have provided all their needs through the winter months.

    2. tillsontitan profile image86
      tillsontitanposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I'm not seeing as many snow birds ... black capped chickadees are few and far between as, for some reason are the goldfinches.  I haven't seen a White-breasted Nuthatch or wren yet this year either.  The titmouse is around but not in great numbers.

    3. Debby Bruck profile image74
      Debby Bruckposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I really love those little chickadees, nuthatch and titmouse. Add the melodious chatter to the bird feeders.

  6. duffsmom profile image61
    duffsmomposted 5 years ago

    No, we live in Montana and pretty much everything goes south for warmer weather and I wish I was with them!  But so far I cannot say I have seen any difference in any wildlife in our area except deer because we are overrun by wolves right now.

    1. Debby Bruck profile image74
      Debby Bruckposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I hope the wolves don't get too friendly. No winter birds? Look out for American tree sparrow, rough legged hawk, bohemian waxwing, common redpoll, northern shrike, chestnut-backed chickadee, Harris sparrow, snow bunting, snowy owl

 
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