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jump to last post 1-14 of 14 discussions (19 posts)

polymer clay

  1. Stacie L profile image88
    Stacie Lposted 7 years ago

    does anyone like to work with polymer clay?
    i know the purists don't think it's a true art form.
    it's easier to work with and has some fun colors.

    1. lt86 profile image54
      lt86posted 7 years agoin reply to this

      I've seen primitive stone paintings where thousands of years ago someone spat mud over their hand to make patterns.

      I think is 'pure art' so that's where I take my definition of purist from, and think anywhere someone has taken the trouble to produce something that others might enjoy is art. I might not like what they've done, but to me it's still art.

      I might choose some other words to describe those you are calling 'purists' here. (I've no intention to cause offence, just to give my opinion which is no more valid than anyone else's.)

      Have fun with your clay and do what you think's right.

      T

    2. lbjnflower profile image60
      lbjnflowerposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I work in polymer clay I make art dolls and they are considered collectables

  2. frogdropping profile image84
    frogdroppingposted 7 years ago

    I enjoy sculpting and creating with it. Don't knock it 'til you've tried it huh? wink

  3. earnestshub profile image88
    earnestshubposted 7 years ago

    I prefer to stay with clay myself. smile I enjoy the way it feels.

  4. Stacie L profile image88
    Stacie Lposted 7 years ago

    polymer clay is good for making small items,such as miniatures.
    i know that regular clay has a wonderful texture and nothing beats it for making pots

  5. wychic profile image88
    wychicposted 7 years ago

    Yes, I love polymer clay! I've used it for all manner of sculpture, art dolls, jewelry, and items made with faux surfaces like wood, metal, precious stones, leather, cloth, etc. There's really no end to the things you can do with it, and there's just no comparison with regular clay because the applications are entirely different. This week I've been playing with some embossing techniques on clay "cloth" and I LOVE the way that's working out, it gives a whole new dimension to clothes on sculptures.

  6. profile image53
    suscanposted 7 years ago

    I like to work with polymer clay. It offers so much variety.
    The embossing and special effects are great. I think that both types have their places in artwork, but sometimes people get snobbish about what is truly artistic.

    1. Castlepaloma profile image77
      Castlepalomaposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      I'm building an entire artistic village from 92% natural clay from my land.

      The greatest advantages from polymer are in much smaller scale, art peaces. That can be made cleanly, light weight and easy to ship. The downside is the price of polymer clay.

      I will be showing some works on line here soon, that I sand painted them afterward.

      The main importance is the artist self, the material is secondary.

  7. Hestia DeVoto profile image60
    Hestia DeVotoposted 7 years ago

    I like that polymer clay can be used to imitate other materials, such as ivory or coral, so that you can make pieces that look like those things without actually having to harm the living creatures which make them to have them in your jewelry.

    I've played around with polymer clay a bit but it's not something I've put as much time into as I wish.  (so many projects... only two hands...)

  8. heart4theword profile image78
    heart4thewordposted 7 years ago

    Yes, that clay is great!  I don't know anyone who doesn't like it:)  Maybe you can write a hub about it, and show us what you have done with it:)

  9. Jamie Brock profile image94
    Jamie Brockposted 7 years ago

    I love making pendants with polymer clay.  They turn out very pretty.. and it is so easy to work with.  The latest thing I did was mixing a silver and black clay together to make a marbled look.  These turned out SO pretty!! I still am fairly new to polymer clay but I really love it.

  10. talfonso profile image81
    talfonsoposted 5 years ago

    What can I say? Sure - why not? I find it useful for making pendants, charms and beads.

    About a month ago, I delved into the craft and started making charms and pendants. For instance, I just made a posh flatback pendant of the head of Slippy Toad (the annoying frog from the Star Fox series) recently. Instead of his red baseball cap, he wears a pearly red and white marble gallon hat and a gold bowtie, to make him look like he's going to a formal.

    I like the Premo! brand (I just bought Sculpey Oven-Bake Clay from Wally World and found it considerably too soft for caning or sculpting.) because it does a good job at canework at a good price. (I could've bought Kato Polyclay or even FIMO but even with a millionaire income I'm sticking to Premo! for budget's sake.)

    1. Castlepaloma profile image77
      Castlepalomaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Being sculptor all my life, did not fine poly-clay very workable and too expensive.

      The greatest up side for some sculptors is no kiln is needed, poly-clay dose well for higher prices with it and easier to ship than most.

      What is Premo?

      1. talfonso profile image81
        talfonsoposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        It's a poly clay brand.

  11. knolyourself profile image60
    knolyourselfposted 5 years ago

    I remember, I didn't like the smell I think.

  12. leilabarda profile image61
    leilabardaposted 5 years ago

    I love to play and create my chibi dolls using polymer clay.

  13. Making-Jewellery profile image74
    Making-Jewelleryposted 5 years ago

    I think polymer clay has made clays achievable for people without the tools/space to work with more traditional clays. 

    Making clay pots etc is pretty unachievable and expensive..... picking up a packet of polymer clay while down the town and coming home to make something small (and without mess/fuss) is much more reachable.

    Having accessibility will make some people graduate to other forms .... that they'd have never entertained without their first forays with the easier methods.

  14. Stacie L profile image88
    Stacie Lposted 5 years ago

    Yes, I agree; polymer clay is fun and doesn't take as much time to create an object. Large Pots are a challenge though, with polymer clay.

 
working