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jump to last post 1-6 of 6 discussions (6 posts)

How difficult is it to make beads at home? What kind of supplies might one need?

  1. davenmidtown profile image88
    davenmidtownposted 6 years ago

    How difficult is it to make beads at home? What kind of supplies might one need?

  2. Kireina Jewellery profile image59
    Kireina Jewelleryposted 6 years ago

    hmmmm l'm the wrong person to be asking, because l make pendants and l don't make beads. You would need polymer clay - l recommend premo by sculpey. Really high quality and doesn't break easily. There are some great books on beading techniques by Donna Kato (polymer clay guru and well known artist) - lf you don't want to buy any then go to your library they will def have books on making beads out of polymer clay.

    l don't think it is too difficult - l guess it depends on how fancy you want them

    Here is a link to a very good website with tutorials on bead making that l would recommend.

    http://www.beadsandbeading.com/blog/

    l hope this is of some help.  Good luck!

    Take care
    Laura

  3. duffsmom profile image60
    duffsmomposted 6 years ago

    One way to make an easy bead it to make paper beads.  Cut colorful high quality paper into long - 6 to 12 inches skinny triangles, maybe 1/4 inch at the widest end.  Begin to roll the on a bamboo skewer stick (the kind used for shis ka bobs) rolling the widest part against the stick and continuing to roll until the entire strip is rolled tightly and glue down the "pointy" end of the triangle to the rest of the "bead."  Slip the bead off of the skewer and let it dry thoroughly.

    Once thoroughly dry you can coat them with mod podge for a nice gloss--best to put them back on the skewer for this so they don't get stuck to something while drying.

    The length and width of the skinny triangles determines the size of the bead.

  4. profile image0
    susanm23bposted 6 years ago

    What you need really depends on what type of bead you want to make.  Polymer clay beads are lightweight and can be brightly colored and very detailed (clay cutting and shaping tools, polymer clay, skewers for holes, oven to bake the clay--don't use your regular oven in which cook food). Wool beads are soft and very versatile (wool roving in the colors you like, dish soap and water).  There are many more--the possiblities are huge!

  5. randomcreative profile image93
    randomcreativeposted 6 years ago

    Learn to make clay, paper, plastic, and glass beads.  I include supplies, techniques, tutorials, and resources for paper, polymer clay, plastic, ceramic, beaded, fused glass, and  lampwork glass. read more

  6. Cathleena Beams profile image75
    Cathleena Beamsposted 6 years ago

    https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/6528810_f260.jpg

    I recently made some that came out beautiful.  I used the Tri-Bead Roller that is made by Amaco.  I purchased mine from either Hobby Lobby or Michaels (not sure which, but both carry it).  The beads come out much more uniform than the ones I had tried to roll before by hand without using this handy tool.  I will definitely be making more of them.  I'm attaching a photo of the recent necklace and earring set that I made using Premo Sculpey Polymer Clay.  I mixed four parts light blue with two parts white and one part bright green of the pearl type clay to create my own sea foam blue green color and brushed on a coat of Triple Thick Brilliant Brush On Gloss Glaze to make my pieces shine.  I have tried piercing the holes in the beads both before and after baking and although piercing them is easier with unbaked clay, I prefer waiting until afterward to put the holes in and using a hand held device called a pin vise to drill them in straight.  I purchased the pin vise at Hobby Lobby and used their forty percent off one regular priced item weekly coupon to get it for less than $10.00.  For making beads at home, my recommendations are the tools that I've mentioned in my post and also a toaster oven is good so that you don't have to use your regular oven, and a paint brush dabbed in cold water helps to smooth finger prints off of the clay before cooking if you don't want to sand them after baking.  Sanding isn't fun and I like to avoid the need for it as much as possible.  If you do plan on sanding though, you will need several sizes of sand paper.  Automotive stores such as Advance Auto or Auto Zone will have the finer sizes that work great for Polymer Clay (1000, 1500, 2000 grid sheets).

 
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