Have you ever had a vehicle "die" and become irreparable? If so, what did you do

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  1. multiculturalsoul profile image85
    multiculturalsoulposted 6 years ago

    Have you ever had a vehicle "die" and become irreparable? If so, what did you do with it?

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  2. LoisRyan13903 profile image71
    LoisRyan13903posted 6 years ago

    I had a car that would not pass the emissions test.  The engine light would not got out and there were transmission codes and since it had over 300,000 miles on it, it was not worth putting a lot of money into it.  Luckily I had some money saved up for a down payment and was able to get a newer car.  My credit was not that great so I went through a buy-here pay-here dealership.  Though the interest was higher, I paid extra money each week and got the car paid off in two years

    1. multiculturalsoul profile image85
      multiculturalsoulposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      What did you do with the "dead" vehicle?

    2. LoisRyan13903 profile image71
      LoisRyan13903posted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Got $500 for it at the junkyard.  And what is wrong with your car?

    3. multiculturalsoul profile image85
      multiculturalsoulposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      My son's car engine locked up/quit/gave up/breathed its last/refused to go. It seems it was burning oil for many months internally. We found no leaks.

  3. FatFreddysCat profile image97
    FatFreddysCatposted 6 years ago

    Yep, my previous vehicle (a Jeep Cherokee) done blowed up real good ...I was drivin to work when the engine started making all kinds of horrible noises and the whole vehicle shuddered and shook. My mechanic told me I'd "blown a lifter" (whatever that means) in the engine and fixing it would cost more than the whole vehicle was worth (it was over ten years old and had close to 200,000 miles on it).
    Fortunately the mechanic hooked me up with a guy who bought the Jeep off of me to use for parts.

    1. multiculturalsoul profile image85
      multiculturalsoulposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      The mechanic hooked me up with his "preferred" salvage yard--probably a relative. The salvage yard made a fair offer considering it had rear end damage. I'm still considering it.

  4. Gawth profile image70
    Gawthposted 6 years ago

    Almost every car, unless burned to a crisp, has some value.  I would advise you to advertise it in a used car flyer to be sold on a best offer (BO) basis.  You might be surprised at the offer you accept.  There will be a lot of people offer to haul it away if they can have it  free but there will be others who recognize the usable salvage parts on the car.  The hood, trunk lid, spoiler wing, tires, wheels and even the seats and handles may be just the think someone if looking for.  If you sold it to a salvage yard, they would probably buy it for a pittance.  You might get a little more advertising it in an auto bulletin board.

    1. multiculturalsoul profile image85
      multiculturalsoulposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I first offered it to an auto mechanic friend of mine who also does smash up derbies (including the small car division). He passed on it. My main problem: too many vehicles (4) and not enough room. My city won't let it sit in the yard either.

  5. profile image56
    writerscramp570posted 6 years ago

    It depends on how old the car is, but if you look it up in Kelly's blue book for it's value in poor condition, you can sell it for parting out, or if the body is in great shape part it out yourself if your mechanically inclined, you would get way more for it that way. Parting out yourself, will allow you to price each piece and get more then the value of the total car.

    1. multiculturalsoul profile image85
      multiculturalsoulposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      If I had the time and space (see above), I might do this. Part of me is angry it only lasted 20 months (we bought it used) and I still owed money on it. I am glad to be rid of it--and the extra insurance cost.

  6. duffsmom profile image59
    duffsmomposted 6 years ago

    Yes, I had an old 59 Studebaker, my first car. It burned oil like crazy and just was not worth saving. My husband called a wrecker, they paid us $15 for the car and they towed it off.

    1. multiculturalsoul profile image85
      multiculturalsoulposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      My father had a '52 Chevy that died somewhere on the Pennsylvania Turnpike. He said he put as much oil as gas in it. The wrecker (an apt name) towed and kept it for the the price of the tow.

  7. chrissieklinger profile image86
    chrissieklingerposted 6 years ago

    I called someone who deals with scrap metal and they towed the car to a junkyard. They did not charge me anything since they were making money off the metal. You might be able to take it to a junk yard yourself and make money.

    1. multiculturalsoul profile image85
      multiculturalsoulposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      That is where it is now. I'm sure they'll part it out instead of crumpling all that ... plastic. There isn't a whole lot of metal in it. And yes, they're usually more than happy to tow it away for free.

  8. CapCooL profile image91
    CapCooLposted 6 years ago

    My Grand Prix died on me. It's been sitting in my driveway rusting away. I was gonna junk it but my brother in law said he could fix it so I gave it to him.

    1. multiculturalsoul profile image85
      multiculturalsoulposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      The car in question (see above) is now at a salvage yard. I rescued the radio and walked away with $400. I'm sure they'll make at least five times that much parting it out, but what can you do? A new engine cost more than the car was worth.

 
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