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jump to last post 1-4 of 4 discussions (4 posts)

Do you think we will ever get to a day when Women and Men receive equal pay? And

  1. bluesradio profile image71
    bluesradioposted 2 years ago

    Do you think we will ever get to a day when Women and Men receive equal pay? And is this important?

  2. lisavollrath profile image96
    lisavollrathposted 2 years ago

    I was listening to a discussion about this today, and one of the participants pointed out that while students of both genders come out of college with the same amount of debt, female students can expect to make 77 cents for every dollar their male colleagues do. They incur the same debt for the same education, but it takes women longer to pay it back, because they will make less. That means it takes women longer to start saving for retirement, even though statistically, she will live longer than a man. Does that seem reasonable?

    Same job, same pay. That will always be important.

  3. dashingscorpio profile image87
    dashingscorpioposted 2 years ago

    https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/12734991_f260.jpg

    I sort of doubt it.
    There will always be justifiable and unjustifiable reasons why one person earns more money than another person. Unless you have a situation where they both graduated from the same college, same GPA, same amount of  past experience/responsibility, asking for the same amount in salary, and being offered the position during the same economic climate it would be hard compare apples to apples.
    So many of the big differentiators have to do with timing, personality, and (salary negotiation skills of the candidate) being considered.
    We see the same thing happening with the purchase cars and homes. Some people simply aren't comfortable with haggling over price. Everyone {has the option to walk away} from an offer they feel is unfair. The hiring manager's goal is to get the best talent for the least cost to their company. It's always been that way.
    The only way to get around not having equal pay for equal job titles/responsibilities would be to enact laws forcing all employers to pay the same exact salary for employees with specific job titles.
    My hunch is in a free market workplace very few people want the government to go that far into the private sector to outline company payrolls. If you got a job during an economic boon you'd likely be offered more than if you got the job during  a recession.
    Equality and fairness are easier to legislate than they are to implement. Every group that  has had to fight for their rights in America continues to have to fight them. It's never "over".

  4. tamarawilhite profile image91
    tamarawilhiteposted 2 years ago

    1. Men and women receive equal pay for equal work when hired for the same position with the same experience and producing the same outcome. No one says, "You're a woman, 10% less".
    2. Most of the "pay gap" is an average of all women's earnings versus all men's earnings - and more women work part time while more men work overtime. The person working 60 hours a week should make more than the one working 30 hours, if doing the same thing.
    3. Men with less education are more likely to be in dangerous semi-skilled and low skilled jobs like construction, forestry, fishing, skilled trades, while the women are more likely to be office workers, childcare, elder care. Both have a high school diploma and a little education afterward, but his work is more physically demanding and dangerous - so she makes minimum wage while he makes 1.5 times that. If she dug ditches, too, she'd make more - but few women do.
    4. Young women without children make as much as young men without children. You see a drop off in wages when women start to have kids, because more of them drop to part time or don't travel or work overtime. Employers pay more to the person working 60 hours a week than the one working 40, even if both are salaried, in the form of greater raises and promotions. And this isn't gender bias, because childless women keep up with the men when they work the same grueling schedules.

 
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