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jump to last post 1-9 of 9 discussions (17 posts)

is entrepeneurship a matter of culture?

  1. Gabriel F. Alava profile image56
    Gabriel F. Alavaposted 8 years ago

    Hi, lads
    I became an entrepeneur with my home based business some three months ago.What I promote is internet based home businesses, and in this three months, nearly anything has happened.I have been offered a job, hired as a broker to sell a cosmetic company, be contacted by a portuguese realtor to sell his properties internationally and also hired as a consultant to show a certain company staff how to be positioned on the web.
    Strange as it may seem, no one seems to be interested in owning a home business in Spain, where I promote, and this type of internet business is perceived as scam or pyramid scheme.
    Funny enough, in places like Scandinavia, Uk or the States it is perceived as legitimate and normal...
    Any comments?
    All the best,
    Gabriel fernandez-Alava

    1. profile image0
      Go Writerposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Hi, Gabriel.

      I do think it is cultural, and that as a whole, Europe is coming on board with the internet marketing circle either slower than North America and Asia, or it there's a huge demand, but not a lot of avenues to work with.

      For instance, Clickbank is currently talking about expanding its operations out to Europe market, so there's definitely a demand.

      I also read a press release once from a UK-based SEO company that states a lot of UK small businesses are still reluctant to take their operations online.

      This was a surprise for me, as an American, because most of the programs I bought were from UK, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. Maybe it's just the programs I happened to run into.

      But in America, the idea of the American dream and building something from nothing, has always been apart of our culture. So it seems quite natural to us. I'm sure the same sort of spirit is in Europe, too, but it appears that traditional avenues might be valued more.

      Maybe some of that will change.

    2. ksmith88 profile image61
      ksmith88posted 7 years agoin reply to this

      I think it depends on the capitalistic structure of a country.  In some countries free enterprise is actively discouraged.  In others, they favor free enterprise but also favor traditionalism.  Therefore, entrepreneurship is discouraged.  It is true entrepreneurs who go against this status quo.

  2. Cagsil profile image81
    Cagsilposted 8 years ago

    Entrepreneurs are individual people who go into business for themselves. When large enough then move on to corporate type structures.

    If the Country deems it a scam, but it works and doesn't allow citizens to partake, then I would say there is a problem with government. smile

    Just my thoughts on it. smile

    1. Gabriel F. Alava profile image56
      Gabriel F. Alavaposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks for sharing your thoughts, Cagsil, I really appreciate.

  3. aguasilver profile image77
    aguasilverposted 8 years ago

    I visited your website and I'd say the problem may just be that it looks like all the other teaser pages that I get to see, and which I ignore.

    As for it being classed as a scam in Spain, you will know that we are busy trying to clean up the image of Spain, which has previously attracted many scam businesses, and until now allowed them to operate.

    But times are changing...

    John

    1. Gabriel F. Alava profile image56
      Gabriel F. Alavaposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks, Aguasilver for the reply.It is a pitty, as i think that the opp I defend is the best, but you might be right, something to do with the landing web page, that might not deliver the right level of confidence.
      Pitty I part time this with some other activities I am involved in, because marketing is my life and coaching people always has been my vocation.
      Happily enough I have just started to skip the other activities and will concentrate in improving my online presence.
      Thanks for visiting my web and take the time to post a comment.

  4. profile image47
    daniellemahlerlaposted 8 years ago

    I understand how you feel. I actually find that no matter which forum you join, any kind of linking to a website is considered spam even if the business is legit. There aren't many free ways to promote, so why not designate a few forums for people to link trade. How are small and start up businesses supposed to grow without some free advertising. It affects everyone from the CEO's to the lowest mail room worker. If you are a stay at home mom or other form of stay at home worker, you have almost no chance to advertise with a restricted budget. Luckily I found a great guy named Tony Faver that helped me learn how to get my freelance business off the ground on my own and without government help!
    Just wanted to let you know you had someone in your corner

    1. Gabriel F. Alava profile image56
      Gabriel F. Alavaposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks a lot daniellemahlerla for posting a comment.I am involved in so many activities at the moment, but network marketing is the one that truly fulfills me.
      Thanks for being in the struggling small entrepeneur corner!

  5. Roy McDonald profile image54
    Roy McDonaldposted 8 years ago

    Hi Gabriel,
    I think that a lot of people just don't have what it take to keep moving through the constant blocks or walls that come up when you start or create a new business even if it as easy as just marketing a product or service. It just so happened's that these are the people who don't want to work and they sit at home. I think you should change your target market, and move away from the name home based business.

    Understand who your ideal customer is, identify how to communicate with them, then execute as soon as you can. Then do it over and over measuring your results you will find the best way to communicate to new customer. Write it, Do it, Review it.

  6. profile image0
    CuencaManposted 7 years ago

    My advise is that people read some books like Napolean Hill's "Think & Grow Rich" (a classic), and look at Garret Loporto's "The Davinci Method" (do his quick test on line). Also look at doing a career suitability test such as The Harrison InnerFiew. A DISC test will also help. These sorts of tests will indicate whether you have natural entrepreneurship qualities.

    If you don't test as being so suitable, then simply look for a partner who does have, and become a team. It is all about self-awareness.

  7. ilmdamaily profile image63
    ilmdamailyposted 7 years ago

    Yes, to a certain degree, entrepeneurship is a matter of culture.

    But there is also an element of natural ability and character traits which "push" someone into this path.

    I think the real tradgedy is that we don't recognise entrepeneurs sooner in life. Often, its the kids in school who don't fit in, are rebellious, and get left behind who fit the perfect template of the entrepeneur.

    I saw an absolutely outstanding video on this idea the other day. Watch it now - it's incredibly interesting:

    Cameron Herold: Let's Raise Kids to be Entrepeneurs
    http://www.ted.com/talks/cameron_herold … neurs.html

    1. MEGT profile image54
      MEGTposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      So true - we have developed a course to catch those young people who don't fit in to traditional high school, and get them launched into the business world with the skills to manage people and projects.

      Otherwise, they have nowhere else to go!

    2. Sunny_S profile image61
      Sunny_Sposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      What a brilliant video on TED. Amazing. Damn i would love to go there smile

  8. MillionPoundBiz profile image56
    MillionPoundBizposted 7 years ago

    The main problem with "Home Businesses" is that they are pretty much all the same in nature. You are trying to "sell" a product that will apparently make someone rich. These products have been around way too long now and most are generally an MLM type setup.

    If you are a true entrepreneur you need to think up new ideas and bring them to the market. Do not try and sell someone else's marketing tools.

    The best and generally wealthiest entrepreneurs started from scratch, thought up an idea that was unique or very sparse in the market and used their self made belief to make it work.

    There are still many many ideas that have not been thought of yet - you just need to find one and work hard at it.

    Always remember; you do NOT need to pay to be an entrepreneur!

    1. mable cellphone profile image56
      mable cellphoneposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      totally aggree with you.glad to know your opinions.this is mable from shenzhen,China.could u tell me how this hub it is.where are most hubbers from?which country mostly?Thanks.I am still very new here.

  9. Cordale profile image76
    Cordaleposted 7 years ago

    What you'll find is that entrepreneurship is not the only thing that is cultural. EVERYTHING is cultural. Anything from kissing to the way people greet each other. It doesn't surprise me that they view it differently.

 
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