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It's strange that we still use blankets

  1. Jessie L Watson profile image94
    Jessie L Watsonposted 3 weeks ago

    It seems quite reasonable to point out that for about a hundred years we've been able to modulate environmental factors in our homes but we go out of our way to find the perfect blanket. We can basically terraform every room in our house to fit our needs and wants yet we still cling to our blankies for something I can only surmise as a psychological regression into fetal nourishment. They help us feel like we can return to the soothing warmth of a mothers womb. I can't find anything really wrong with this although it does seem a bit pitiful the more I think about it.

    1. mike102771 profile image78
      mike102771posted 3 weeks agoin reply to this

      It’s all a conspiracy of Big Blanket. They want us to need them, man. I tell you it’s a cover-up. Big blanket and whole comforter cartel. But I said too much.

    2. Sherry Hewins profile image98
      Sherry Hewinsposted 3 weeks agoin reply to this

      It is instinctual. Baby monkeys prefer a wire mother covered with cozy cloth to a bare one that feeds them. I know that I must have at least a sheet over me to sleep, no matter how warm my room is.

  2. Jessie L Watson profile image94
    Jessie L Watsonposted 3 weeks ago

    haha. I was counting on strange responses as this was a deliberately strange post.

    1. mike102771 profile image78
      mike102771posted 3 weeks agoin reply to this

      You laugh but big blanket has its threads in everything man. They cover it all.

      1. Rochelle Frank profile image95
        Rochelle Frankposted 3 weeks agoin reply to this

        It is woven into our culture and is a comforter for many.

    2. Jessie L Watson profile image94
      Jessie L Watsonposted 3 weeks ago

      With (redacted) administration as their leading benefactor.

    3. Marisa Wright profile image99
      Marisa Wrightposted 3 weeks ago

      I certainly hope we will all continue to use blankets.

      It's true we can regulate our home temperatures, but for most people, that means using air conditioning and heating, both of which cost money and waste resources.  A blanket is a much less wasteful method of keeping warm.

    4. Rochelle Frank profile image95
      Rochelle Frankposted 3 weeks ago

      Yes-- I agree with Marissa + they look nice on beds, especially the handmade quilts that remind us of their makers.
      I actually prefer to sleep on a cool room, with cozy blankets, breathing fresh air, and keeping warm at the same time.

      1. mike102771 profile image78
        mike102771posted 3 weeks agoin reply to this

        Don't be fooled. Those quilts are just a way for the Amish to take over the world one bed at a time.

        1. Rochelle Frank profile image95
          Rochelle Frankposted 3 weeks agoin reply to this

          I admit the Amish are a major threat. They are ready to take charge when the power grid goes down and they are the only ones left who know how to do things.

          1. mike102771 profile image78
            mike102771posted 3 weeks agoin reply to this

            A group of men that go around all quiet, frowning with beards and all dressed in black and don't get me started on the buggies.

            1. Rochelle Frank profile image95
              Rochelle Frankposted 3 weeks agoin reply to this

              Yes,they do sometimes use blankets in the buggies, though in our current world situation we should probably be more concerned about the Afghans.

              1. theraggededge profile image100
                theraggededgeposted 3 weeks agoin reply to this

                Ooo! big_smile

                1. Rochelle Frank profile image95
                  Rochelle Frankposted 2 weeks agoin reply to this

                  Oooooo how we love our blanket.
                  https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/13798278_f1024.jpg

                  1. snakeslane profile image81
                    snakeslaneposted 2 weeks agoin reply to this

                    Ooooo

              2. mike102771 profile image78
                mike102771posted 2 weeks agoin reply to this

                Afghan
                https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/13796254.jpg

    5. snakeslane profile image81
      snakeslaneposted 3 weeks ago

      Definitely some loose threads around here today. But this one takes the blanket. Just sayin'...

    6. Jessie L Watson profile image94
      Jessie L Watsonposted 3 weeks ago

      Lol. Been a good day.

    7. poppyr profile image99
      poppyrposted 3 weeks ago

      Your body temperature goes down when you fall asleep, so a comfortable temperature when you're awake will feel cold after you doze off. That's why we need blankets. Plus, they're comfortable to cuddle up under, of course.

    8. gerimcclym profile image100
      gerimcclymposted 3 weeks ago

      This thread is hilarious. Thanks for the laughs and Happy Thanksgiving to all!

    9. janshares profile image99
      jansharesposted 2 weeks ago

      Yes, this is a strange thread but in a hilariously delightful way. So I must chime in. big_smile In addition to psychological comfort, I think it's also about psychological safety and protection. We are vulnerable when we sleep, a total loss of control over our body awareness. Covering up while we sleep protects us, if only from the occasional spider or mosquito. yikes big_smile

      1. mike102771 profile image78
        mike102771posted 2 weeks agoin reply to this

        That sounds like the "duck & cover" from the 1950's and 1960's with the idea that a thin wooden desk or your arm could protect you from an atomic bomb.
        https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/13797160.jpg

        You see, this is how big blanket gets you. They make you addicted to the banket. The blanket will protect you.

        1. Rochelle Frank profile image95
          Rochelle Frankposted 2 weeks agoin reply to this

          Duck and cover
          https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/13797235.jpg

          1. snakeslane profile image81
            snakeslaneposted 2 weeks agoin reply to this

            Good one (s). I prefer duck down and cover...

            1. mike102771 profile image78
              mike102771posted 2 weeks agoin reply to this

              I don't know the whole thing sounds fowl


              https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/13797349.png

              1. snakeslane profile image81
                snakeslaneposted 2 weeks agoin reply to this

                Run? Waddle away? It's got me wondering. How do you get down off a duck?

                1. mike102771 profile image78
                  mike102771posted 2 weeks agoin reply to this

                  It's easy just go to one side and let gravity do it. Just try not to step on the wings (they hate that). It's harder to get onto the duck.

                  1. snakeslane profile image81
                    snakeslaneposted 2 weeks agoin reply to this

                    That's just Quakers smile

                    1. Rochelle Frank profile image95
                      Rochelle Frankposted 2 weeks agoin reply to this

                      Now I think you are confusing Amish with Quakers.
                      Quakers don't use buggies anymore, but quackers will eat bugs. Don't take that as a  blanket statement.

          2. mike102771 profile image78
            mike102771posted 2 weeks agoin reply to this

            https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/13797344.png

        2. janshares profile image99
          jansharesposted 2 weeks agoin reply to this

          Yes, mike, lol big_smile

        3. DzyMsLizzy profile image96
          DzyMsLizzyposted 2 weeks agoin reply to this

          I know, right?  Or in junior high, we were to sit on the floor in the hallway, facing the lockers, and bend forward, arms over our heads!  (presumably because at that age, we could no longer fit under our desks...)
          Yeah!  Real safety and protection!
          More like perfect position to bend over and kiss your arse goodbye!  And we weren't even given any blankets.
          I shall have to discuss this with my therapist!

          1. mike102771 profile image78
            mike102771posted 2 weeks agoin reply to this

            We did the same hallway crouch for tornado drills back in the 1980’s. My favorite thing was the fire drills in the middle of winter. We couldn’t take our coats to class, so everyone was in the snow and cold without them. One school had its fire drills end in the gym (I guess so we could all die together).

    10. Rochelle Frank profile image95
      Rochelle Frankposted 2 weeks ago

      If you sleep with a cozy Afghan (hound) you will be cozy, warm, protected from predators and covered with dog hair in the morning.

      1. DzyMsLizzy profile image96
        DzyMsLizzyposted 2 weeks agoin reply to this

        Don't you need 3?  Then you have a 3-dog-night! 

        (HA!!  I crack me up!)

    11. gerimcclym profile image100
      gerimcclymposted 2 weeks ago

      This thread keeps getting more interesting.

    12. snakeslane profile image81
      snakeslaneposted 2 weeks ago

      Think I'll stick with feather duvet, and a blanket. It's winter guys, bundle up. Stay warm...

    13. cmiller0161 profile image94
      cmiller0161posted 2 weeks ago

      My first blanket has been holding me hostage since I was a baby. It whispers in my ear every night, telling me that if I ever disobey orders it will kill me in my sleep. I now have a small army of blankets as requested by Blankie. I feel so smothered and overheated. Someone please send help.

      1. Rochelle Frank profile image95
        Rochelle Frankposted 2 weeks agoin reply to this

        You still have your baby Blankie, cmiller? How old are you? Nevermind that, maybe you need it. It looks like your lips are turning blue. smile

    14. Gregory DeVictor profile image97
      Gregory DeVictorposted 2 weeks ago

      I am originally from Northern California. Contrary to what some people might think, it can get cold at night there depending upon where you live (for example, in San Francisco’s Richmond and Sunset Districts). As a matter of fact, it can even be cold in the Richmond or Sunset during the day depending upon the wind current. Early on, I became acclimated to sleeping with blankets year around as well as to always leaving home with a jacket on. Furthermore, it is not uncommon for tourists to come to the Bay Area for a vacation and have to go to Macy’s in Union Square to buy outerwear.

      1. mike102771 profile image78
        mike102771posted 2 weeks agoin reply to this

        It was 30 degrees (Fahrenheit) here in Akron, Ohio this morning. You know shorts weather.

      2. DzyMsLizzy profile image96
        DzyMsLizzyposted 2 weeks agoin reply to this

        ROFL, Gregory!  I, too, am a San Francisco born and raised native.  We lived on the other side of town, in Vistitacion Valley, which was sort of the "donut hole" in the overcast (along with the Mission District).
        However, moving from the blanket to the moth hole, my first house was in Pacifica, which inspired this poem (probably also understandable for those out in the Sunset):

        "Standing on the cliffs at dusk;
        The sun comes out,
        And goes down.
        You have to live in Pacifica
        To understand."

        LOL

        1. snakeslane profile image81
          snakeslaneposted 2 weeks agoin reply to this

          Lol. As long as you understand MsLiz, that's what makes poetry.

          1. DzyMsLizzy profile image96
            DzyMsLizzyposted 2 weeks agoin reply to this

            LOL--the point of the poem being, that in that area, it would be foggy and cold and overcast most of the day; the sun might break through sometime between 4 and 6 in the evening, just in time for sunset. (In the summer, anyway--the clear skies happened in winter--provided it wasn't raining.)

    15. Gregory DeVictor profile image97
      Gregory DeVictorposted 2 weeks ago

      If you’ve ever lived in Erie, PA, you would certainly know what blankets are because it gets mighty cold there during the winter. I’ve noticed that at least two members of HubPages live there and would probably confirm this.

     
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